Climate Change: The 1.5 Climate Challenge

Climate Change Projections

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Climate Change: The 1.5 Climate Challenge

Climate Change Projections

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“We don’t just give food, we should teach how to grow our own food” – Sustainable Community Pantries
June 18, 2021 Friday

To ensure that health protocols are observed, community pantries have signages reminding locals to maintain physical distancing, wear masks, and disinfect. Photo from the presentation of Adeline Almelor of the Zero Waste Community Pantry in Brgy. San Miguel, Iriga City Camarines Sur. MANILA, 18 June 2021 — The 49th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” featured five founders of zero-waste and innovative community pantries that exhibit not only generosity and consideration, but also sustainable and green practices to inspire more Filipinos to reduce the use of plastic packaging and to plant their own food at their homes.   The online conversation hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda featured community pantry organizers including Adeline Almelor from Brgy. San Miguel, Iriga City Camarines Sur Zero Waste Community Pantry; Jay-vee Mendoza from Anahaw, San Pedro, Laguna Community Plant-ry; Edren Llanillo, Co-founder of Go Bike Project, Bugallon, Pangasinan; Maricon Alvarez from Mother Earth Foundation (MEF) Malabon Community Pantry; and Evelyn Vergara, Founder of the Community Reading Pantry of Tabotong Elementary School in Saranggani Province.   “Dapat hangaan ang mga community pantries sa innovation, sa bayanihan, sa unique na ugali ng mga Pilipino na tumulong hangga't kaya, at sa honesty ng mga Pilipino na kukuha lang niyang kainin at ng kanyang pamilya,” said Legarda.   The guest organizers shared how their community pantries allow people to donate and get food and basic necessities for free, while others distribute vegetable seeds and plants to help people grow their own food. Other pantries also delivered healthcare and educational services.   “Nakakataba talaga ng puso na maging daluyan ng pagtutulungan.  As we highlight the gift of sharing, we are happy to show and hopefully to inspire others that there are many alternatives to single-use plastics,” said Almelor.   "Ang slogan po ng Anahaw Community Pantry ay 'Take what you can plant, share what others can sow.' Ito ay inspired sa community pantry ng Maginhawa although nilagyan namin ng konting twist – ang sine-share namin dito at plants, seedlings and knowledge sa pagtatanim," said Mendoza.   “Simple lamang ang konsepto ng GO BIKE Project, una mag-train ng mga kabataan para maging emergency responders, maging first aiders na tutugon sa panahon ng sakuna, pangalawa mag-customize, mag-disenyo ng mga bisikletang gagamitin nila upang tumugon doon sa mga aksidente, o para magbigay ng first aid sa sino man nangangailangan ng tulong. It’s a combination of a youth na biker volunteers, first aider, tapos meron na rin silang gagamiting bike in saving lives,” said Llanillo.   "Nang dumating ang community pantry, naisip namin na ang ganda ng konsepto na tumutulong ka. Why not help the community people na nakakausap natin sa araw araw na turuan sila i-embrace yung konsepto ng zero waste?" said Alvarez.   “Ginawa namin ang Reading Community Pantry, na kung saan inilabas namin ang reading materials from our reading corner sa school at inilatag sa pantry, kasama ng mga snacks na binili galing sa sariling bulsa,” said Vergara.   A community pantry is a service that offers goods directly to locals. It operates on trust systems and banners the slogan, “Take what you need, give what you can.” The first community pantry during the pandemic was set up in Maginhawa in Quezon City.   Legarda then encouraged the viewers and other community pantries to adopt sustainable practices – by giving people seeds and plants for people to grow in their homes, instead of just giving canned goods, noodles, and instant foods.   “Hindi lang dapat bigay ng bigay, hindi tayo dapat forever na umaasa sa iba. 'We should give a man a fish, but also teach him how to fish'. In this case, we give the person a seed, so that that person can grow his/her own food. We give human a food, but it's better to teach the person how to grow their own food,” Legarda concluded.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.

CCC: The Youth Will Lead the Way to a Sustainable Future
June 18, 2021 Friday

A circular economy is an alternative economic model which promotes a more resource-efficient and cleaner production systems as no materials will be wasted. Photo from the presentation of Comm. Rachel Anne S. Herrera. MANILA, 18 June 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) encourages the youth to join the ongoing campaign to phase out single-use plastics and accelerate the uptake of circular economy to strengthen the country’s climate action.   In the Sulong Pilipinas 2021: Climate Change and the New Normal with the Youth Sector forum, organized by the Department of Finance, discussion focused on the importance of the role of Filipino youth in helping the country become more resilient to the effects of climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic and in improving socioeconomic policies. Hundreds of youth leaders and members of various youth organizations joined as the DOF and CCC, together with other national government agencies and private sector organizations, presented their related programs and initiatives.   Finance Secretary Carlos G. Dominguez III, who is also the Chair-designate of CCC, said that the climate crisis could wipe away the country’s economic gains in one go, like a tsunami, if we continue to do nothing and fail to mitigate it.   On a long term average basis, the Philippines is expected to incur PHP 177 billion (USD 3.6 billion) per year in losses to public and private assets due to typhoons and earthquakes. In the next 50 years, the country has a 40% chance of experiencing a loss exceeding PHP 989 billion, and a 20% chance of experiencing a loss exceeding PHP 1,525 billion.   “As bearers of the future, the youth--who will have to live through 2030 and beyond--have the greatest stake in overcoming this crisis. It is therefore very important that you understand this issue and take the lead in reversing this destructive course,” said Dominguez. “We need your determination to build a greener, healthier and climate-resilient future. We want you to use your talents, knowledge, and passion to achieve our climate ambition.”   Finance Assistant Secretary Paola Alvarez presented the country’s adaptation and mitigation measures, as well as initiatives in setting up the climate finance roadmap.   Climate finance in the country is a balance between the implementation of sustainable climate change actions and the pursuit of the country’s economic growth and development potential – focusing on financial instruments that are designed to mitigate the economic impacts of climate change while increasing revenue generation, taking into account environmental risks and impacts; and on green facilities and solutions to finance programs and projects on environment and natural resources management.   “All of these things are part of our commitments to show that the Philippines is serious in terms of implementing its climate change initiatives. We hope that the youth will appreciate what we are doing so that you can craft actionable recommendations on what or how you think the government can do policy or take action to help you secure your future,” said Alvarez, who is also the representative of Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III in the Advisory Council of the Principles of Sustainable Finance.   CCC Commissioner Rachel Herrera shared the government’s initiatives on circular economy and anti-single use plastic campaign. She emphasized that pursuing a circular economy is interconnected with phasing out single-use plastics – which has been an environmental, public health, and climate change concern.   A circular economy is an alternative economic model where no materials are wasted; instead of ending up as waste, they move back to the beginning of the supply chain, meaning used materials find new lives. It adopts a more resource-efficient and cleaner production systems where the industry becomes more competitive while protecting the environment better.   “Our country’s single-use plastic problem is already hurting the entire planet. This is not the wake-up call—we’ve already been hearing that for many years now; but it is high time to stop pressing the snooze button, and start solving the problem,” Herrera stressed.   The CCC encourages the youth to adapt to more sustainable lifestyles and inspire more people to shift away from single-use plastics, and towards circularity and sustainability.   “The circular economy is largely focused on the technology and business side, but in the end a shift to it will only happen and succeed if individuals live sustainably—and in that, I hope you can spark positive, lasting change,” Herrera said. “We look forward to your insights on these issues. With young Filipinos like you leading the way, we have faith: susulong tayo sa mas ligtas at sustainable na kinabukasan para sa inyo,” she added.   Sulong Pilipinas is the annual consultative conference between the Duterte administration and various citizen groups. Since 2016, Sulong has been the platform for the government to consult stakeholders on socioeconomic priorities.   For more updates, visit the Facebook Page of Sulong Pilipinas at facebook.com/TulongSulongPH.

CCC: Sustainable Gastronomy is a call for Climate Action!
June 16, 2021 Wednesday

MANILA, 16 June 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) joins the world in the celebration of local ingredients and producers, preserving culinary traditions and the environment, raising awareness on global sustainable development measures across the sectors of agriculture, forestry, and fisheries, and to practice sustainability in our daily lives this Sustainable Gastronomy Day.   June 18 of each year marks the celebration of Sustainable Gastronomy Day under UN General Assembly Resolution A/RES/71/246. This celebration aims to focus the world’s attention on the role that sustainable gastronomy can play in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, including by promoting agricultural development, food security, nutrition, sustainable food production and the conservation of biodiversity,   Gastronomy is the study of the relationship between food and culture. It involves training and studying the preparation, production, and service of the various foods and beverages, from countries around the world. Sustainability is the idea of something that is done in a way without causing any infliction to our natural resources and can be continued into the future without harming our environment or health.   Sustainable gastronomy is the cuisine that takes into account where ingredients are from, how food is grown/sourced and how it gets to our markets and our plates, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.   But the Special Report on Climate Change and Land released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated that food generated between 21% and 37% of man-made emissions, specifically from: (i) crop and livestock activities within the farm; (ii) land use and land-use change dynamics associated with agriculture; and (iii) food processing, retail and consumption patterns, including the manufacture of chemical fertilizers and fuel.   For this celebration, the CCC urges everyone to help build a common vision for sustainable gastronomy — where food is nutritious and accessible to all, where we use clean sources of energy for cooking like through natural gas and electricity instead of coal, where we use biodegradable packaging like cooking and wrapping food in banana leaves, and where our ingredients and natural resources are managed in a way that maintains ecosystem functions to support current human needs, and lowers our carbon footprint. 

Zero-waste at makabagong community pantries, bibida ngayong ika-49 na episode ng seryeng ‘Stories for a Better Normal’
June 16, 2021 Wednesday

MAYNILA, ika-16 ng Hunyo taong 2021 —Magtitipon-tipon virtually ang ilan sa mga kilalang community pantry organizers upang ibahagi ang kani-kanilang sustainable and green practices sa pag-oorganisa sa mga community-based initiatives ngayong ika-49 na episode ng seryeng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” na may temang, “Zero-waste and Innovative Community Pantries.”   Pinangungunahan ni dating three-term Senator, at ngayo'y Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda ang episode na ito, na mapapanood sa Huwebes, ika-17 ng Hunyo 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live sa facebook.com/CCCPhl at facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Kasama sa gaganaping online na talakayan ang mga community pantry organizers mula sa iba’t ibang dako ng bansa, kabilang na rito sina Adeline Almelor mula sa Brgy. San Miguel Iriga City, Camarines Sur Zero Waste Community Pantry; Maricon Alvarez mula sa Mother Earth Foundation (MEF) Malabon Community Pantry; Jay-vee Mendoza mula sa Anahaw, San Pedro, Laguna Community Plant-ry; Edren Llanillo, Co-founder ng Go Bike Project, mula sa Bugallon, Pangasinan; at Evelyn Vergara, Founder ng Community Reading Pantry ng Tabotong Elementary School sa Saranggani Province.   Nagtatayo ng mga pansamantalang community pantries ang mga Pilipino para matulungan ang mga naghihikaos sa pera dahil sa kawalan ng trabaho ngayong panahon ng pandemya. Sa pamamagitan ng mga nasabing community pantries nagkaroon ng paraan ang mga tao para mag-donate at makakuha ng libreng pagkain at iba pang pangunahing pangangailangan, habang ang iba naman ay namamahagi ng mga binhi ng gulay at iba pang mga halaman upang makatulong sa ibang tao na makapagtanim ng sarili nilang kakainin. Samantala, naghahatid din ang ilang pantries ng mga serbisyong pangkalusugan at pang-edukasyon.   Itatampok sa episode na ito ang mga indibidwal na nag-organisa at nanguna sa community pantries sa kani-kanilang mga barangay. Ipinakita nila hindi lamang ang kagandahang loob at konsiderasyon, kun’di pati na rin ang pagsasagawa ng mga zero-waste operations, umaasa na magbigay inspirasyon sa maraming mga Pilipino na bawasan ang paggamit ng plastic packaging.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan, kamalayang pangkapaligiran, at mga kasanayan sa pag-angkop sa klima, naglalayon ang "Stories for a Better Normal" na baguhin ang kaisipan ng mga tao, mga pamilya, at mga pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga pamamaraan kung saan maaaring magkaroon tayo at isabuhay natin ang isang ‘better normal’ sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.   Na-organisa ang online na talakayang ito mula sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) na binigyang-suporta naman mula sa Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Mother Earth Foundation, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, and The Climate Reality Project-Philippines.

Zero-waste & Innovative Community Pantries in 49th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
June 15, 2021 Tuesday

MANILA, 15 June 2021 — Community pantry organizers will gather virtually to exhibit sustainable and green practices in organizing and participating in community-based initiatives on the 49th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic, “Zero-waste and Innovative Community Pantries.”   The episode, hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 17 June 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are community pantry organizers from various areas in the country including  Adeline Almelor from Brgy. San Miguel Iriga City , Camarines Sur Zero Waste Community Pantry; Maricon Alvarez from Mother Earth Foundation (MEF) Malabon Community Pantry; Jay-vee Mendoza from Anahaw, San Pedro, Laguna Community Plant-ry; Edren Llanillo, Co-founder of Go Bike Project, Bugallon, Pangasinan; and Evelyn Vergara, Founder of the Community Reading Pantry of Tabotong Elementary School in Saranggani Province.   Filipinos are setting up makeshift community pantries to aid those that suffer economically as a result of the pandemic. The Community Pantries allow people to donate and get food and basic necessities for free, while others distribute vegetable seeds and plants to help people grow their own food. Other pantries also delivered healthcare and educational services.   The upcoming episode will feature individuals who organize and lead community pantries in their respective barangays. They exhibit not only generosity and consideration, but also practice zero-waste operations, hopeful to inspire more Filipinos to reduce the use of plastic packaging.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Mother Earth Foundation, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, and The Climate Reality Project-Philippines.