CCC Launches Climate Change Consortium for Climate-Smart Leadership, Governance
PANDAN, ANTIQUE September 11, 2019—Northern Panay will the first region in the Philippines to benefit from a climate knowledge-sharing, support and advocacy consortium of national government agencies, local government units (LGUs), and higher education institutions (HEIs). The Northern Panay Climate Change Consortium (NPCCC) was officially launched at the end of the five-day Climate Resilience Field School Capacity Building Training for the Province of Antique conducted in the Municipality of Pandan. “Risk assessment is fundamental in coming up with a science and risk-based local climate change action plan and other local plans. The event today is symbolic, because we are collaborating with national government agencies and the academe to really serve the LGUs and the local communities who are actually in the frontline of climate change impacts,” CCC Secretary Emmanuel De Guzman during the launch. The CCC facilitated the establishment of the NPCCC to further strengthen the cooperation between national and local governments and the science and academic community on mainstreaming climate change adaptation and mitigation in local development planning in the Northern Panay Region. The NPCCC will model the way for the formation of more regional multi-stakeholder partnerships that will accelerate the delivery of capacity building and technical assistance to LGUs, the private business sector, and other entities in key vulnerable areas in the country. Members of the NPCCC agreed that bringing climate science closer to communities to inform their policies drives relevant and tangible actions, both at the national and grassroots level. “Coming-up with a risk-based and evidence-based assessment entails strong commitment from the partners, and the LGUs as beneficiaries of the intervention to gather numerous data development of vulnerability and risk maps and analyzing the assessment result to properly allocate their very limited financial resources to programs and projects that would directly or indirectly respond to or mitigate climate change and its impacts,” Engr. Carmelo Orbista, Regional Director of Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) Region VI, said. “We hope to expand the DILG’s partnership to other HEIs and SUCs in the region given their expertise in sciences and research,” he added. “The role of HEIs is to prepare the society to adapt to the impacts of climate disruptions through our research and education on adaptation strategies. Higher education should also take the leadership role in climate mitigation and adaptations. HEIs should make the fundamental contributions to climate adaptation efforts by identifying the most pressing climate impacts related to specific communities, especially in relation to the most vulnerable populations in our society,” said Dr. Anna Mae Relingo, Vice President for Academic Affairs of the Aklan State University. The NPCCC is composed of the CCC, DILG Region VI, Commission on Higher Education Region VI, Department of Education Region VI, Ms. Remelyn Recoter, Department of Agriculture Region VI, Northwestern Visayan Colleges, Aklan State University, and University of Antique.  
September 11,2019 Wednesday
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Miss Earth 2017 Karen Ibasco Joins the UN Youth Climate Summit in New York
MANILA CITY, 9 September 2019 – Miss Earth 2017 Karen Santos Ibasco officially joins the first ever United Nations Youth Climate Summit in New York City happening on September 21.  The historic event will gather 500 young climate action leaders from countries all over the globe to showcase their unique climate solutions at the UN, and have a dialogue with decision and policy makers on climate change. This will be the largest gathering of young climate leaders at the UN in history.    Selected participants to this event demonstrated their firm commitment to address the climate crisis and displayed leadership and initiative in advancing solutions towards development. “Youths play a crucial role in addressing climate change. We are the voice of this generation in spreading awareness on the importance of preserving and cultivating what is left of the planet. We are the ones who will experience its irreversible impacts if the world will not act sooner. The invitation to the upcoming UN Summit came as an honor and opportunity for me to raise the voice and empower more youths as we continue to call for action,” Ibasco said.   The Youth Climate Summit will feature a full-day of programming that brings together young activists, innovators, entrepreneurs, and change-makers who are committed to combating climate change at the pace and scale needed to meet the challenge. It will be action oriented, intergenerational, and inclusive, with equal representation of young leaders from all walks of life.   Ibasco is a physicist and a known active environment advocate before she won the prestigious Miss Earth title in 2017. She recently joined the Climate Change Commission as its Youth Ambassador for Climate Action and advocates the promotion of energy conservation and utilization of renewable energy across the country which shall further contribute to the global call to limit the global average temperature to 1.5 degrees Celsius. “With her background and innate passion for change, we are optimistic that she will be able to encourage more young people to do more and to do better in our fight against the enormous challenge of climate change,” CCC Secretary Emmanuel De Guzman said.   
September 09,2019 Monday
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CCC Rolls Out Capacity Building for Climate-Smart Farming in Antique
PANDAN, ANTIQUE September 6, 2019 – Local government units (LGUs) in Antique received a comprehensive training on localizing climate information systems and managing Climate Resiliency Field Schools (CRFS) which could help farmers bolster the resilience of their livelihood. Organized by the Climate Change Commission (CCC) and the Rice Watch Action Network Inc. (R1), in collaboration with the Office of Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, the five-day CRFS Capacity Building Training for the Province of Antique happened in the Municipality of Pandan. The CRFS Training is designed to capacitate municipal agricultural officers in the province to establish climate field schools for farmers in their respective municipalities. Towards the end of the workshop, participants are expected to submit their re-entry and commitment plan to implement CRFS. This will enable the CCC to monitor and assess the effectiveness and impact of the training to the participants Recognizing the important role of climate and weather information systems in helping farmers adapt to climate shifts and extreme weather events, the training will also orient the participants on the Localized Climate Information Systems for Agriculture and Fisheries.  On the final day of the training, the CCC will formally launch the Northern Panay Consortium—a conglomerate of agencies and higher education institutions which aims to provide technical assistance for the enhancement of Local Climate Change Action Plans of the seventeen (17) LGUs of Aklan and four (4) LGUs of Antique.  
September 06,2019 Friday
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LGUs in Yolanda Corridor Pledges Action on Climate Emergency
TACLOBAN CITY, LEYTE  27 August 2019 – Local government leaders of the Yolanda Corridor expressed their commitment to respond to the prevailing climate emergency during the Communities for Resilience (CORE) Modular Training Rollout held last August 12-16, 2019 at Tacloban City, Leyte. Together with Climate Change Commission (CCC) Secretary Emmanuel De Guzman, Abuyog Mayor Lemuel Gin Traya, Dulag Mayor Mildred Joy Que, Tolosa Mayor Maria Ofelia Alcantara, and Tacloban City Mayor Alfred Romualdez signed the declaration entitled CORE Resolve of the Local Governments in the Yolanda Corridor to convey their resolve in ensuring an effective and collective response to the impacts of climate change in the country. The local leaders, in particular, vowed to support the strengthening of cooperation between and among the national and local governments and the science and academic community on mainstreaming climate change in local development planning; scale up climate resilience-building efforts at the local community level; and enhance their Local Climate Change Action Plans to become more responsive to the prevailing and emerging needs of communities. The CORE Modular Training Rollout is the CCC’s flagship capacity building program for local leaders and planners on mainstreaming climate change in local development and investment planning. This year, CORE aims to give preferential attention to local communities in the Yolanda Corridor, to coastal communities more vulnerable to rising sea level and salt water intrusion, and to indigenous peoples whose resilience to extreme weather events are compromised by weak and vulnerable livelihoods. “We only deem it fit to re-launch the CORE here in Tacloban, the ground zero of Yolanda. Tacloban, along with other cities and municipalities in the Yolanda corridor, showed us that climate change is no longer a mere specter on the horizon. It is happening now and it will only get worse with business as usual,” Secretary De Guzman said during the opening ceremony of the five-day training workshop. Tolosa Mayor Maria Ofelia Alcantara, meanwhile, expressed their gratitude to the CCC for the CORE rollout in their region. “We are really happy na nandito ang Climate Change Commission kasi ang Tolosa is a small municipality with 15 barangays with 21,000 population. 88 percent of our land area is agriculture, and we have a 76-hectare protected marine sanctuary. But ngayon, because of climate change effects, it has really gone down kaya we want this na mas makagawa ng adaptation programs and interventions para maiwasan na natin ang paglala nito,” she said. More than 39 representatives from the local government units of the Eastern Visayas Region, academic institutions, civil society organizations, and the private sector participated in the event, which included lectures on climate and disaster risk assessment process, greenhouse gas inventory, climate change expenditure tagging, and a workshop on project proposal development for the People’s Survival Fund (PSF). With the goal of widening the scope of technical support to LGUs for accessing the PSF, the CCC also launched the PSF e-learning platform during the workshop. The platform, which runs through an open source learning management system, enables the CCC to conduct a 12-week online course for LGUs and community organizations to enhance their knowledge on climate and disaster risk and vulnerability assessment, the PSF and its approval processes, and other sources of climate finance. There will be two batches per year, which will run from August-October and February-June. Details of the PSF e-Learning Platform and Mentoring Session are available on the CCC website climate@gov.ph, PSF website psf@climate.gov.ph, and CCC’s Facebook and Twitter accounts. For inquiries, interested groups could contact the CCC-CCO PSF Unit at (02) 420-5513 or Telefax at (02) 420-5517, or via email at psf.ccc@gmail.com.
August 27,2019 Tuesday
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CCC, Aboitiz Partner in Building Local Communities’ Climate Resilience
MANILA, Philippines 24 July 2019 – The Climate Change Commission (CCC) and Aboitiz Equity Ventures Inc. (AEV) have forged a partnership that will increase the adaptive capacity of local governments to climate change. CCC Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman and Mr. Sabin M. Aboitiz, AEV chief operating officer, signed yesterday the Memorandum of Understanding for the implementation of the CORE: Partnerships Towards Climate-Smart Philippines Program during a simple signing event held at the AEV Headquarters in BGC, Taguig City. The partnership is expected to accelerate the delivery of trainings on science and evidence-based climate and disaster risk assessments, enhancement of Local Climate Change Action Plans (LCCAP), and development of project proposals for the People’s Survival Fund, among others. It will also promote simple adaptation practices that readily build the resilience of communities to climate change. In a shared message during the signing ceremony, De Guzman noted that the Paris Agreement on Climate Change acknowledges the crucial role of non-state actors such as the business sector in advancing climate action. “Collaboration is at the heart of climate action and sustainable development. And I am confident that this collaboration between the CCC and Aboitiz will deliver the transformational change needed by our communities,” he said. Mr. Aboitiz, meanwhile, highlighted the crucial role of local governments in the country’s response to climate change. “Our approach is anchored in our belief that the growth of people and their leaders are fundamental to the development of our society and our country,” he said. AEV is committed to supporting the training of local communities in all their business locations, particularly in developing and enhancing the LCCAPs of their local governments, a deliverable asked by the Climate Change Act of 2009.
July 26,2019 Friday
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CCC Lauds President Duterte’s Call to Accelerate Clean Energy Transition
MANILA, July 24, 2019 --The Climate Change Commission (CCC) welcomes the policy pronouncement of President Rodrigo Duterte to advance rapidly renewable energy deployment and reduce the country’s dependence on coal for energy generation, a strategy aligned with achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement on climate change which the Philippine government ratified in March 2017.  “We recognize the urgent need to ensure the sustainability and availability of resources and the development of alternative ones. In this regard, I trust that Secretary (Alfonso) Cusi (Department of Energy) shall fast-track the development of renewable energy sources and to reduce dependence on traditional energy sources such as coal,” President Duterte said in his Fourth State of the Nation Address (SONA).  The presidential directive effectively sends a clear signal to policymakers, regulators, investors, and energy industry executives to promote and invest in more affordable, reliable, and cleaner power infrastructure, which in turn, builds diversity of electricity generation, and bakes in long-term energy sector price deflation. “The president’s SONA pronouncement on coal energy clearly conveys that the country is not only taking the low-carbon development pathway, but will also pursue it faster,” said CCC Secretary Emmanuel De Guzman. “This only means that the country shall pursue socioeconomic development in a manner that is clean, healthy, and sustainable for the Filipino people,” De Guzman explained. “This also means that technology development and transfer and investment in renewable energy and energy efficiency, the country’s energy sector’s transition as a whole, will have to take place in an accelerated manner.”  De Guzman also cited that the Renewable Energy Act of 2008 provides the legal and institutional framework necessary for harmonizing policies on the development of renewable energy technologies. The Act aims to enable the Philippines to move rapidly towards its goal by developing and utilizing resources such as solar, wind, hydropower, ocean and biomass energy. “Renewable energy can provide a major share of the Philippine electricity mix in a stable and reliable manner and at the same time increase energy self-sufficiency and reduce supply-related risks,” De Guzman said. “We must act swiftly to transform our energy sector and to deliver its socioeconomic benefits to the Filipino people as we also help achieve the 1.5C Paris goal.”  He referred to the Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius, noting that limiting warming to 1.5C entails dramatic emission reductions by 2030 and carbon neutrality by around 2050. This means there is a need to take advantage of the increasing availability of affordable, renewable and efficient energy solutions. He also shared that the 2017 climate policy study for the Philippines by the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities and the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis found that replacing imported diesel generation with renewables, especially solar and wind, in small islands can eventually save Filipinos PHP10 billion or roughly US$ 200 million per year. The Philippines’ total installed power generating capacity continued to grow from 22,728 megawatts in 2017 to 23,815 megawatts in 2018, according to the DOE Philippine 2018 Energy Situation. It added that coal-fired power plants constitute the largest share of the installed and dependable capacity in 2017 with 8,049 megawatts and 8,844 megawatts in 2018. Among renewable energy technologies, hydropower maintains the highest share (1,134 megawatts), wherein the majority comes from the Mindanao Grid. “According to our review, energy efficiency is the easiest and often cheapest way to reduce the need for expansion of coal power generation. And with the country’s energy demand projected to increase by 80 percent between 2017 and 2040, improving energy efficiency in the building sector would be our best course to reduce emissions,” De Guzman said. Since 2016, the CCC has been facilitating a national policy review and framework development on energy, through a whole-of-nation approach, in order to develop a clear policy on coal-fired power plants in pursuit of a low carbon development pathway for the country. “The President’s policy pronouncement comes in a crucial time when we are finalizing our country’s first Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC), our commitment under the Paris Agreement, due for submission this year,” De Guzman explained.  The CCC has been working closely with all government agencies and civil society in defining the targets and pathways for the country’s low-carbon development from now until 2040. At present, the National Economic Development Authority (NEDA) is revisiting the Philippine Development Plan and Ambisyon Natin, as well as completing its economic modelling for the NDC by September 2019. The CCC also supports NEDA, DOE, the Department of Transportation, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, the Department of Trade and Industry, the lead agencies of government for the NDC sectors, in whole-of-government-and-society efforts to transition our economic sectors into a green economy.
July 24,2019 Wednesday
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CCC Vows to Help More LGUs Access Funds for climate change Adaptation Projects
MANILA, July 22, 2019 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) will ensure that more climate change adaptation projects of the local governments can be supported by the People’s Survival Fund (PSF) with the launch of the free PSF e-Learning Platform and Mentoring Sessions in August at the rollout of the Communities for Resilience (CORE) Modular Training for the Yolanda Corridor. The move affirms the Duterte administration’s commitment to strengthen the country’s resilience to the devastating impacts of climate change, said CCC Secretary Emmanuel De Guzman. “Climate resilience is at the heart of the Duterte Administration’s development agenda. This inspires us in the CCC to come up with innovative solutions that will enable more local government units (LGUs) to implement community-led adaptation initiatives,”De Guzman said. Passed into law as Republic Act No. 10174 in 2012, PSF is a national funding mechanism in support to LGUs in implementing climate change adaptation projects. It maintains an annual allocation of one billion pesos.   “CCC has accelerated the implementation of its CORE Program in the past years to help LGUs develop and enhance their Local Climate Change Action Plans (LCCAPs) and to assist PSF project proponents develop science and risk-based adaptation funding proposals,” said CCC PSF Unit head Assistant Secretary Romell Antonio Cuenca.   Since the PSF grant approval and disbursement system was established, the PSF Board has approved six climate change adaptation projects amounting to P330 million. They are the Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Response as Coping Mechanism to Resiliency in Lanuza, Surigao del Sur; Siargao Climate Field School for Farmers and Fisherfolks in Del Carmen, Surigao del Norte; Building Resilience through Community-based Ecological Farming in San Francisco, Camotes Island, Cebu; Promoting Resiliency and Climate-Informed Gerona, Tarlac; Establishment and Sustainable Management of River Ecosystem in Kitcharao, Agusan del Norte; and Saub Watershed Ecosystem Rehabilitation and Flood Risk Reduction for Increased Resilience in Sarangani. Cuenca explained that most of the proposals received by the PSF Board Secretariat at the Department of Finance have been either business-as-usual projects or those kinds usually funded under regular programs of national government agencies, and not climate change adaptation which the law asks; thus, the low-approval rate. “This year, we are working towards widening the scope of technical support to LGUs for accessing the PSF. An e-learning platform has been developed, and a series of one-on-one mentoring sessions is set for the third quarter. They aim to improve the soundness and worthiness of submitted proposals and to assist LGUs in develop full-blown proposals from their concept notes,” Cuenca said. The PSF e-Learning Platform, which runs through an open source learning management system, will be conducted via a 12-week online course for LGUs and community organizations to enhance their knowledge on climate and disaster risk and vulnerability assessment, the PSF and its approval processes, and other sources of climate finance. There will be two batches per year, which will run from August-October and February-June. Employing the latest information technology, Cuenca said, the CCC is also launching the PSF Monitoring and Evaluation System where proponents can track their proposals and submit documents online. In this manner, he said, the process of accessing the fund becomes easier and more convenient and with lesser costs to the proponents. The system will also ensure a more efficient and transparent evaluation and approval process for PSF grants. Details of the PSF e-Learning Platform and Mentoring Session are available on the CCC website climate@gov.ph, PSF website psf@climate.gov.ph, and CCC’s Facebook and Twitter accounts. For inquiries, interested groups could contact the CCC-CCO PSF Unit at (02) 420-5513 or Telefax at (02) 420-5517, or via email at psf.ccc@gmail.com.  
July 23,2019 Tuesday
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CCC, DILG to Train More LGUs to Adapt to Climate Change
MANILA, July 17, 2019 — More local governments will receive training on local climate change action planning this year, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) reveals today as the Pre-SONA forum concludes in Davao City.  This year’s rollout of the Communities for Resilience or CORE Modular Training Program for local government units (LGUs) will commence in August. “It’s a good time to resume training LGUs following the assumption of newly elected local officials many of whom demonstrate a strong resolve to pursue climate action and environmental protection,” Climate Change Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman said. More than 80 LGUs are expected to benefit from the training and to deliver enhanced Local Climate Change Action Plans (LCCAPs) which the Climate Change Act of 2009 asks of every LGU.  Based on Department of the Interior and Local Government’s latest count, 1073 LGUs now have LCCAPs, a hundred fold increase from 137 in 2015. “There is greater awareness now among local authorities on the importance of LCCAP in ensuring community resilience to climate change and sustainability of local investments,” said CCC Strategic Partnership Division Chief Alexis Lapiz. CCC and DILG are set to issue this year a joint memorandum circular to LGUs on establishing the quality assurance review system for LCCAP.  This year’s first wave of CORE training in August will benefit all LGUs in Yolanda Corridor. The second wave will assist vulnerable coastal municipalities in Luzon in September, while the last wave shall help muslim and indigenous peoples communities in Mindanao in October.  “We give preferential attention to the new poor in Yolanda Corridor, coastal communities more vulnerable to rising sea level and salt water intrusion, and indigenous peoples whose resilience to extreme weather events are compromised by weak and vulnerable livelihoods,” De Guzman said on the priority target areas for this year’s CORE rollout. Since the launch of its CORE Program in 2016, CCC has trained 124 LGUs on enhancing LCCAPs and 133 faculty members from state universities and colleges across the country on standard modules for mentoring local planners. They include modules on climate and disaster risk assessment, greenhouse gas accounting, climate budget tagging, and PSF project proposal development. CORE trainings are expected to be in full swing next year to cover the rest of the country. “Networking state universities and colleges and higher education institutions is key to the sustainability of CORE as a capacity building program for LGUs. This is why we are forming multi-stakeholder consortiums among NGAs, SUCs, private universities, and research institutes.” De Guzman said. “This way, we strengthen the cooperation between national and local governments and the science and academic community on mainstreaming climate change adaptation and mitigation in local development planning,” he added. “As we celebrate in October our 10th year anniversary as an institution, CCC endeavors to present more knowledge and learning exchange platforms for our LGUs so they can readily apply adaptation solutions and good practices and strengthen the resilience of our communities which are at the forefront of climate change impacts,” De Guzman said. To sustain peer-to-peer learning among LGUs on climate change adaptation and mitigation and disaster resilience, CCC and DILG are jointly holding the 3rd National Convention on Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction during the national observance of the Climate Change Consciousness Week in November.  
July 17,2019 Wednesday
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National Disaster Resilience Month
MESSAGE   Strengthening local risk governance is key to strengthening disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) in the country. Therefore, in observance of the National Disaster Resilience Month, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) calls for greater cooperation between national government agencies and local government units in enabling and facilitating risk-informed local development planning, emergency preparedness and response planning, and impact-based forecasting and multi-hazard early warning for early and effective community action. As the climate emergency exacerbates disaster risks and threatens to erode our hard-earned development gains, the CCC will be relentless in our efforts to ensure the integration and coherence of climate action and DRRM at all levels in the country.   With this greater task at hand, the resolve of our President Rodrigo Duterte to uplift the quality of life of the Filipino people and  to build the resilience of our communities to climate change will keep us in the right direction. His marching order is very clear: Making the Philippines climate-resilient and disaster-ready is a top priority of the government.    SECRETARY EMMANUEL M. DE GUZMAN Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Climate Change Commission MANILA 09 July 2019
July 09,2019 Tuesday
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CCC Supports President Duterte in his Call for ASEAN Member States to Step Up and Uphold Climate Justice
The Climate Change Commission (CCC) strongly supports the call of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte for ASEAN countries to play its active and leadership role in addressing climate change in the global community and stand for climate justice. In his statement during the 34th ASEAN Summit Plenary in Bangkok, Thailand early this month, Pres. Duterte urged ASEAN member countries to make developed countries accountable for climate change, and to assist adapt and build our resilience by advancing initiatives that care for the people and the environment.  “Cooperation is key. We highly support the President’s call upon ASEAN countries to join forces in calling out industrialized nations to counteract the threat of climate change. We need to send a very clear signal to the international community that ASEAN leaders are taking decisive climate action,” CCC Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman said. De Guzman stressed that the contribution of countries to climate change, and their capacities to survive its consequences, varies enormously. With innovation of their more advanced mechanisms, developed nations tend to emit more carbon footprints than those of the developing ones.  Furthermore, with little to no resources, vulnerable and developing countries will find it unviable, if not difficult, to catch up from these fast-progressing nations. This shows the need for developed countries to provide technologies and investments, in the form of climate finance, to developing countries as part of their mitigation efforts. The most vulnerable countries, like the Philippines, that are least responsible for the climate crisis always carry the heaviest burden. In the recent Global Peace Index 2019 report, Philippines was listed as the most vulnerable to climate risks in terms of its overall natural hazard score, followed by Japan, Bangladesh, Myanmar and China. “We maintain that those with historical responsibility must shoulder the far greater burden of acting faster, sooner, and with far bigger accountability of keeping the long-term temperature goals to no higher than 1.5 degrees Celsius. Otherwise, it's all hypocrisy from rich countries that have benefited the most from the burning of fossil fuels which heightened climate change,” he added.  
June 20,2019 Thursday
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CCC Urges Banking Sector to Ramp Up Financing for Climate-Smart Projects
PASIG CITY 11 June 2019 – Highlighting the need to mobilize climate finance to enable the translation of the country’s climate goals and needs into action, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) urged financial institutions to provide innovative solutions and investment models that will spur financing on green, climate-smart, and sustainable projects during the Roundtable Dialogue on Climate Finance held recently at the Discovery Suites, Ortigas Center. The dialogue organized by the CCC with the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Secretariat brought together senior representatives from the government, banking sector, private sector associations, multilateral and bilateral agencies involved in the mobilization and delivery of climate finance. Discussions focused on the role of public finance and private sector investments in the implementation of the country’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) to the Paris Agreement, which is now being finalized through a whole-of-government-and-society approach being facilitated by the CCC. Mr. Daniele Violetti, Director for Finance, Technology and Capacity Building of the UNFCCC Secretariat, emphasized that 2019 is a critical moment for countries to raise targets ahead of implementation starting 2020. “It is our last opportunity to enhance action in the pre-2020 period. It also hounds the roles of the new rounds of NDCs, making 2019 the year to ensure that these new or updated NDCs reflect the increased ambition needed to meet the objectives of the Paris Agreement,” he said.   In urging financial institutions to ramp up financing for climate change adaptation and mitigation, Climate Change Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman said that the government is addressing the shortage of risk information in the country in order to de-risk investments. “We are working on the establishment of a National Integrated Risk Information System, an integrated platform that will converge all available vulnerability and risk information in the country. This will be made accessible to all stakeholders, including the financial and private sector,” De Guzman said. “In addition to that, we are also assisting the Office of Civil Defense in developing loss and damage registry and protocols for valuation and validation, which could provide the insurance sector with a better picture of risk prevalence,” he added. Climate Change Commissioner Rachel Herrera, National Focal Point to the Green Climate Fund (GCF), noted that climate finance is currently limited in terms of availability. “There is no other recourse but to be strategic in terms of funneling in climate finance from various sources and channeling them to those who need it the most,” she said. Herrera said that the CCC, as the Philippine National Designated Authority (NDA) to the GCF, is seeking funding under the Readiness and Preparatory Support Program of the GCF to establish a monitoring and verification system of climate finance flows in the Philippines. Herrera also shared that the GCF Technical Working Group, a group established by the CCC to review and assess the technical merits of the funding proposals submitted to the NDA, is now deliberating two multi-country funding proposals that aim to leverage GCF funds in order to attract more private sector investments through equity sharing and de-risking of renewable energy projects. “This is an indicator of the private sector confidence in investing in the Philippines for energy efficiency and renewable projects,” she said.  
June 11,2019 Tuesday
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CCC Urges CEOs to Join the Green Energy Revolution
Makati City, Philippines 10 June 2019 – “We are now living in a period of exponential transformation. We’re seeing the beginnings of a radical change in the world’s energy system,” Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman of the Climate Change Commission (CCC) said as he urged chief executive officers to join the green energy revolution during the CEO Forum on Financing Government Energy Efficiency Projects held in Dusit Thani Manila recently. Citing a report released by the International Renewable Energy Agency, De Guzman said that the decade-long trend of strong growth in renewable energy capacity continued in 2018. “As total global renewable energy generation capacity reached 2,351 gigawatts at the end of last year, renewable energy now accounts for a third of global power capacity ,” he noted. Attended by business leaders, government officials, and civil society, the forum which was organized by the European Union-supported Access to Sustainable Energy Programme and the Department of Energy aims to facilitate discussions on key issues and challenges in implementing energy efficiency projects. In his keynote address, De Guzman challenged business leaders to invest in clean and green infrastructure and practices including energy efficiency and renewable energy. He noted that the energy sector has consistently accounted for a significant percentage of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions and, therefore, offers the highest mitigation opportunity for the country’s Nationally Determined Contribution for the Paris Agreement.   “Energy efficiency is the easiest and often cheapest way to reduce the need for expansion of power generation. And with the country’s energy demand projected to increase by 80 percent between 2017 and 2040, improving energy efficiency in the building sector would be our best course to reduce emissions,” De Guzman said. De Guzman added that renewable energy can provide a major share of the Philippine electricity mix in a stable and reliable manner and at the same time increase energy self-sufficiency and reduce supply-related risks. “There is no debate that coal is the most carbon-intensive of all fossil fuels. It brings serious public health, ecological, and economic risks to the country,” he explained. “Renewable energy now presents the biggest opportunity for local investment,” he added.  
June 10,2019 Monday
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CCC Calls for Rapid, Just and Global Climate Action
MANILA, 7 June 2019 – The Climate Change Commission (CCC) reiterated its call for countries, especially the developed nations, to ramp up climate action efforts and to deliver more ambitious commitments to mitigation with utmost urgency and equity. CCC Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman said the Philippines, being one of the most vulnerable countries that bear the brunt of the devastating effects of climate change, will continue to actively pursue climate action in the context of climate justice. “We support the statement of President Rodrigo Duterte, our chairman in the Commission, that all governments must do their fair share in combating the climate crisis,” De Guzman said. “Unfortunately, global action has been slow. The Philippines has been actively pursuing climate action, but largely on our own efforts and resources. We have no choice but to act, and sometimes we have bilateral partners to thank for when they give some help. With the unrelenting impacts of climate change in our communities, we must do all we can to survive and thrive as a people and nation,” he continued. In his visit to Tokyo, Japan earlier, President Duterte stressed in his speech that the Philippines has demonstrated leadership in global consensus to fight climate change, adding that the climate negotiations would hold and undertake real action, especially by those most responsible for this momentous problem. “There is indeed a need for clarity of commitments by all countries on mitigation and climate finance. It’s time to raise the profile of climate issues and radically step up our efforts. We need real action and accountability from the developed countries that is primarily responsible for the climate crisis. This has been the negotiation stance of the Philippines in calling for more ambitious and faster climate action by. This has also been the essence of our fight for the 1.5oC global warming limit,” De Guzman said. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report on a 1.5 degrees warmer world released last year paints a grim scenario of the worst impacts of climate change such as the increasing risk to drought, flood, extreme heat and poverty for hundreds of millions of people. It underscores the most urgent need for rapid global action. World leaders have only 12 years to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 45% of 2010 levels if they want to limit global warming to 1.5oC. More than 195 countries, including the Philippines, that have ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change are meeting annually at the Conference of Parties since 1995 to take stock of their progress, monitor the implementation of their obligations and continue talks on how best to tackle climate change. It is, therefore, important for the Philippines to participate and to be at the forefront of the international efforts to address climate change. De Guzman explained that, in the global community, the Philippines is highly regarded as a leader of the climate vulnerable developing countries (CVF), as it championed and upheld the endeared principles on climate justice, human rights, ecosystems integrity, gender, grant-based climate finance, loss and damage, and comprehensive disaster risk management, to mention a few areas of discourse for the Paris Agreement on climate change. “In accordance with the Paris Agreement, climate finance, capacity building, and technology transfer from the developed world must clearly come to our shore, considering that the country has been in the frontline of climate impacts,” De Guzman said. The next round of climate talks will be held in Santiago, Chile in December where countries will work on the progress of climate action. “All countries must exhibit leadership and deliver on commitments. Let us step up our global climate action toward securing a climate-safe future,” De Guzman said.
June 07,2019 Friday
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CCC Fast-Tracks Updating of National Climate Change Action Plan
Manila, Philippines 24 May 2019 – The Climate Change Commission (CCC), pursuant to law, is updating the National Climate Change Action Plan 2011-2028 (NCCAP) with a whole-of-government-and-society approach. “We are updating the NCCAP to advance climate actions based on the country’s current development priorities, climate finance strategies, and research and development needs,” CCC Secretary Emmanuel De Guzman said. When completed, the updated NCCAP will articulate two component plans: the National Adaptation Plan (NAP) that presents the climate actions in seven priority areas, and the Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) that defines the country’s pathway for low-carbon development consistent with the 1.5°C long-term temperature goal of the Paris Agreement. Guided by the President’s policy direction to address climate change without impeding the country’s economic development, De Guzman said the NDC will serve as a ready reference for investments in innovative and transformative low-carbon projects for the country’s green economic growth and sustainable industrial development. “Although we emit only less than half of one percent of the global emissions, submitting an ambitious NDC in  the context of our national capability and circumstance is critical in enjoining other nations to heed the call for urgent and ambitious action,” De Guzman said. “We will pursue mitigation as a function of adaptation, which is the country’s anchor climate action strategy,” he added. Aside from the NCCAP and NDC, the CCC is also fast-tracking the development of standards and certification system for providing incentives to enterprises that generate and sustain green jobs, pursuant to its mandate under Republic Act No. 101 or the Philippine Green Jobs Act of 2016.  CCC is also developing a framework for mainstreaming culture-sensitive climate actions of indigenous peoples’ communities in local development plans. All these government initiatives are further strengthened by the 2019 General Appropriations Act (GAA), which contains over 30 general and specific provisions that mainstream and advance the country’s climate and disaster resilience agenda. “Since 2014, our annual budget laws have included general and specific provisions that mainstream and advance the country’s climate and disaster resilience agenda,” De Guzman noted. “This year’s budget law is no different. It reiterates the mandates and responsibilities of agencies under the country’s landmark laws on climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction,” he added. One of the special provisions of the 2019 GAA is for the Department of Education to ensure the integration of climate change adaptation, mitigation (CCAM), and disaster risk reduction (DRR) in the regular subjects in both public and private schools. To ensure that the CCAM and DRR measures are appropriate and responsive in the light of intensifying natural hazards, this year’s budget law also requires multi-scenario, probabilistic risk analysis for all national government projects to be implemented. Pursuant to this, the CCC recently adopted the National Climate Risk Management Framework—an approach for the systematic generation, consolidation, and exchange of climate risk data and information to inform national and local development and investment planning. Another vital provision of the 2019 GAA is the establishment of multi-hazard impact-based forecasting and early warning systems, including the development and enhancement of protocols for early warning and early action. Related to this, the  CCC is facilitating the development of a national integrated risk information system that is accessible to all stakeholders and a national loss and damage registry that uses standard metrics and protocols for valuation and validation. “This year is another busy year for the Commission. In pursuit of our mandates under the law, the CCC will continue to ensure the efficient, effective, and synergistic implementation of climate actions at the national and local levels,” De Guzman said.
May 24,2019 Friday
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CCC Fast-Tracks Updating of National Climate Change Action Plan
Manila, Philippines 23 May 2019 – The Climate Change Commission (CCC), pursuant to law, is updating the National Climate Change Action Plan 2011-2028 (NCCAP) with a whole-of-government-and-society approach. “We are updating the NCCAP to advance climate actions based on the country’s current development priorities, climate finance strategies, and research and development needs,” CCC Secretary Emmanuel De Guzman said. When completed, the updated NCCAP will articulate two component plans: the National Adaptation Plan (NAP) that presents the climate actions in seven priority areas, and the Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) that defines the country’s pathway for low-carbon development consistent with the 1.5°C long-term temperature goal of the Paris Agreement. Guided by the President’s policy direction to address climate change without impeding the country’s economic development, De Guzman said the NDC will serve as a ready reference for investments in innovative and transformative low-carbon projects for the country’s green economic growth and sustainable industrial development. “Although we emit only less than half of one percent of the global emissions, submitting an ambitious NDC in  the context of our national capability and circumstance is critical in enjoining other nations to heed the call for urgent and ambitious action,” De Guzman said. “We will pursue mitigation as a function of adaptation, which is the country’s anchor climate action strategy,” he added. Aside from the NCCAP and NDC, the CCC is also fast-tracking the development of standards and certification system for providing incentives to enterprises that generate and sustain green jobs, pursuant to its mandate under Republic Act No. 101 or the Philippine Green Jobs Act of 2016.  CCC is also developing a framework for mainstreaming culture-sensitive climate actions of indigenous peoples’ communities in local development plans. All these government initiatives are further strengthened by the 2019 General Appropriations Act (GAA), which contains over 30 general and specific provisions that mainstream and advance the country’s climate and disaster resilience agenda. “Since 2014, our annual budget laws have included general and specific provisions that mainstream and advance the country’s climate and disaster resilience agenda,” De Guzman noted. “This year’s budget law is no different. It reiterates the mandates and responsibilities of agencies under the country’s landmark laws on climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction,” he added. One of the special provisions of the 2019 GAA is for the Department of Education to ensure the integration of climate change adaptation, mitigation (CCAM), and disaster risk reduction (DRR) in the regular subjects in both public and private schools. To ensure that the CCAM and DRR measures are appropriate and responsive in the light of intensifying natural hazards, this year’s budget law also requires multi-scenario, probabilistic risk analysis for all national government projects to be implemented. Pursuant to this, the CCC recently adopted the National Climate Risk Management Framework—an approach for the systematic generation, consolidation, and exchange of climate risk data and information to inform national and local development and investment planning. Another vital provision of the 2019 GAA is the establishment of multi-hazard impact-based forecasting and early warning systems, including the development and enhancement of protocols for early warning and early action. Related to this, the  CCC is facilitating the development of a national integrated risk information system that is accessible to all stakeholders and a national loss and damage registry that uses standard metrics and protocols for valuation and validation. “This year is another busy year for the Commission. In pursuit of our mandates under the law, the CCC will continue to ensure the efficient, effective, and synergistic implementation of climate actions at the national and local levels,” De Guzman said.
May 23,2019 Thursday
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CCC: Protect the Oceans by Ending Plastic Pollution
MANILA, PHILIPPINES 09 May 2019—In observance of the Month of the Ocean, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) called for united action to halt the worsening state of our marine ecosystems by minimizing plastic pollution. The Philippines is known for its rich marine ecosystems but is also one of the major sources of plastic trash in the world, contributing almost three million metric tons of plastic wastes and 500,000 metric tons of plastic waste leakage per year. In a report released by the Ocean Conservancy, the Philippines was among the top plastic-waste producers in the world alongside neighboring Asian countries, China, Indonesia, Vietnam, Sri Lanka and Thailand.  “Heathy oceans are critical to the global fight against climate change inasmuch as climate action is needed to protect our oceans. It is in this spirit that the CCC echoes the call to protect our oceans by eliminating plastic waste and plastic pollution,” CCC Secretary Emmanuel De Guzman said. A study conducted by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, in partnership with the World Economic Forum, predicts that there could be more plastics than fish in the ocean (by weight) by 2050.  According to the report, the worldwide use of plastic has increased 20 fold in the past 50 years and it is expected to double again in the next 20 years. “As the fight for climate action and ocean protection becomes one and the same, it is high time for concerned sectors to demonstrate real leadership in reversing the plastic crisis,” De Guzman said.  De Guzman urged the private sector and concerned government agencies to step up with innovative, game-changing, and sustainable measures that would eliminate problematic or unnecessary single-use plastic packaging and substantially reduce plastic waste leakage into our oceans. “There is no silver bullet to protect our oceans and our climate against plastic pollution. We need all sectors to work together to come up with concrete and systematic solutions at the soonest possible time,” he added. De Guzman also urged the public to veer away from the throwaway culture by reducing, reusing, and recycling plastics. “Let us start making choices today that save our oceans and our climate from plastic wastes,” he said. The Month of the Ocean is celebrated annually in the Philippines during the month of May by virtue of the Presidential Proclamation No. 57 issued in 1999.   
May 09,2019 Thursday
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CCC Conducts GHG Inventory Training in Davao
DAVAO CITY 8 MAY 2019 – More than 35 representatives from the Local Government Unit (LGU), academe, and private sector participated in the three-day Greenhouse Gas Inventory (GHG) training for LGUs and stakeholders conducted by the Climate Change Commission (CCC) on 30 April to 02 May 2019. Among the participants were the officials and personnel from the City Administrator’s Office, Office of the City Planning and Development Coordinator (OCPDC), City Environment and Natural Resources Office (CENRO), City Disaster Risk Reduction Management Office (CDRRMO), City Engineering’s Office (CEO), City Transport and Traffic Management Office (CTTMO), DENR-EMB Regional office, Ateneo De Davao University, and Aboitiz Power Company.  The training workshop highlighted the importance of “community-level inventory” which accounts the carbon footprint within the geopolitical boundary of the city. The workshop also explained how to integrate GHG inventory on the local planning process of the LGU. Using the said framework, participants were able to identify possible emission data sources from the agriculture, forestry, waste, land use, and energy and transport sectors, and gave close attention on the GHG emission from the industry sector. Davao City’s actual data for each sector were used during the emission calculation exercises. This is to give the participants a deeper understanding and appreciation of the process and its outcomes. “This new knowledge and skills that we learned can help improve the Davao City’s disaster risk reduction management. If we have this GHGI, we could craft specific projects that will reduce emissions… and eventually reduce the national hazards produced by climate change. We would also like to thank the Climate Change Commission for this training. We will use this knowledge for the betterment of our city,” said Davao CTTMO representative.  This GHGI workshop was requested by the Davao City LGU officials to enhance further the city’s Local Climate Change Action Plan (LCCAP), and improve their adaptation and mitigation actions, in support of the creation of a Technical Working Group (TWG) on climate change through Local Executive Order No. 40 last January 2019.  
May 08,2019 Wednesday
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CCC And Media Agree to Strengthen Climate Change Adaptation Reporting in the Philippines
PASIG CITY, METRO MANILA 25 March2019 –To mainstream climate change adaptation and to increase the quality and quantity of climate change reporting in the country, the Climate Change Commission, journalists and communication officers agreed to collaborate and come up with proposed communication strategies during the 7th National Panel of Technical Experts’ (NPTE) Forum held recently at the Development Academy of the Philippines, Ortigas Center, Pasig City. “Despite the government’s campaign to raise awareness on climate change, numerous warnings from the scientific community, and the availability of scientific studies online and through media coverage, it has yet to break through in terms of effectively changing people’s behaviour or ways of doing things,” said CCC Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman on his opening remarks speech. With the theme, “Strengthening Media Capacity in Communicating Climate Change,” this NPTE Forum aims to bridge the communications gap between and among climate experts, the Philippine media and communications officers in reporting climate change-related issues. The workshop also aimed at strengthening the capacity of our media in effectively communicating climate change to the policymakers and to the general public.More than 30 journalists, communications officers and government information officers participated in the NPTE workshop with the media. “People are aware of the concept of climate change but they lack understanding on the phenomenon. More work needs to be done in making our people understand that failure to act swiftly on climate change will result in unprecedented loss and damage and pose as existential threat to humans and societies,” he added. The forum, moderated by Mr. Ludwig Federigan of CCC, highlights the presentations of the NPTE members, Dr. Laura David and Dr. Rosa Perez, on climate science and climate projections. Mr. Arnold Belver from CCC also shared the country’s position on the recently-concluded Conference of Parties (COP24) and the importance of the successful implementation of the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) to climate resiliency and sustainable development. Dr. David explained that the Philippines, as an archipelagic country, musttake actions on coastal area management and harness the ocean as a renewable energy source. In pursuing the 1.5°C goal of the Paris Agreement on climate change, Dr. Perez stressed that the window of opportunity to achieve this goal is slowly closing, and our lack of strong political will hinder us in addressing climate change. A panel discussion was also participated in by experts such as Dr. Leoncio Amadore, Dr. Rodel Lasco, Dr. David and Dr. Perez about the outcome of the COP24 international climate change negotiations and on how experts and media can improve their partnership in communicating climate change. Participants also joined the group activity, facilitated by Ms. Imelda Abaño, the President of the Philippine Network Environmental Journalists, on how to address the communication gaps, solutions on how to increase the quality and quantity of climate change reporting, innovative tools and ways to present climate change that the public best understand. The participants agreed to collaborate with the CCC in mainstreaming climate change adaptation by continuously participating in the activities of the CCC and joining in capacity building activities for the media. Dr. Glenn Paraso, one of the NPTE, reiterated in his closing remarks the importance of collaboration between the government, experts and the media in effectively communicating climate change to the public.
March 25,2019 Monday
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Message of the Climate Change Commission on the Celebration of World Water Day on March 22, 2019
Every March 22, we raise the profile of water in the global agenda, challenging us to spur action on ensuring the safety and sufficiency of freshwater and sanitation for all. This year's World Water Day is about tackling the water crisis and the reasons why so many people are being left behind. Safe water and sanitation are both necessary for societies to achieve resiliency and sustainability. To echo the statement of the United Nations Water, water is the primary medium through which we will feel the effects of climate change. Water availability is becoming less predictable in many places, and increased incidences of flooding threaten water sources and sanitation facilities. Population growth, rapid urbanization, and climate change have aggravated the already strained water resources. On this day, we rise to the challenge of Leaving No One Behind, the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The theme highlights the importance of advocating for the sustainable management of freshwater resources and advancing initiatives aligned with the goal of the Paris Agreement of limiting the global temperature rise to 1.5 °C. As stated in the IPCC Special Report, limiting global warming to 1.5°C is projected to lower the impacts on terrestrial, freshwater and coastal ecosystems, and will retain more of their services to humanity. Pursuing this Paris goal also reduces the proportion of the world population exposed to climate change-induced·water scarcity by up to 50%. With this, the Climate Change Commission calls on government agencies, stakeholders, development partners and individuals to go beyond raising awareness and to make a remarkable difference in our communities and our planet through collective climate actions. SECRETARY EMMANUEL M. DE GUZMAN Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Climate Change Commission
March 22,2019 Friday
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Bhutan, Mongolia, PH, and Vietnam Sign Declaration on South-South Cooperation
On March 21, 2019, delegates from Bhutan, Mongolia, Philippines, and Vietnam signed a Declaration on South-South Cooperation to access climate finance, particularly the Green Climate Fund (GCF), and to combat climate change. The declaration was signed during the South-South Learning Exchange towards Accessing the GCF, which was organized by the Climate Change Commission (CCC), through the GCF Readiness Programme and in partnership with the Resources, Environment and Economics Center for Studies (REECS), held in Quezon City on March 20-21. “Through this declaration, we express our commitment to address climate change and pursue green growth by sharing knowledge and best practices among fellow climate-vulnerable countries, and as one, to call for increased project and programme development support from the GCF for adaptation and mitigation priorities of our communities,” said Climate Change Commissioner Rachel Anne S. Herrera. Read the declaration in full.
March 21,2019 Thursday
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