Uniting Against Single-Use Plastic in 28th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 2 December 2020 — Advocates against single-use plastic will gather virtually to promote ways to urgently reduce plastic pollution and raise awareness on the negative effects of single-use plastics on people’s health, and on the environment and climate emergency, on the 28th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” with the topic, “Uniting Against Single-Use Plastic.” The episode will air on Thursday, 3 December 2020, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/conglorenlegarda. Mayor Edwin David Santiago of San Fernando City, Pampanga; Julian Rodriquez, Founding member of Plastic Tides PH; and Lara Angelique Lacson, Founder of Eco Warrior PH  will join the online conversation hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda. This episode will focus on the country’s rising problem with plastic pollution, particularly with single-use plastics which have become a symbol of our throwaway culture. Many single-use plastics are used for mere minutes to hours, yet when disposed of, persist in the environment for hundreds of years. The Philippines, despite being known for hosting one of the world’s richest marine ecosystems, is also one of the major sources of plastic trash in the world, contributing almost three million metric tons of plastic wastes and 500,000 metric tons of plastic waste leakage per year. Single-use plastics not only pose pollution problems. Plastic production and incineration contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and hence to climate change. According to the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA), Filipinos use 59.7 billion pieces of sachets, 17.5 billion pieces of shopping bags, 16.5 billion pieces of plastic labo bag, and 1.1 billion diapers yearly. The COVID-19 pandemic has even magnified the problem on single-use plastics as people needed to ensure safety standards that will minimize contamination and further spread of the virus. This has led to utilizing easily disposable items, such as those used for food and other deliveries. The upcoming episode will feature a local government unit banning single-use plastics, a non-profit organization that seeks to raise awareness on plastic pollution, and an online store focused on reducing single-use plastic. As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities. In previous episodes, the online series tackled food gardening and saving seeds, permaculture, good nutrition and diet, native trees, practical sustainability, narrating risk to resilience stories through books, tree pest and disease management, reviving indigenous textiles and crafts, transforming waste into wages, championing sustainable urban mobility, food waste reduction and management, transforming food supply chain, and responsible gardening. This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
December 02, 2020 Wednesday
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CCC lauds Congress’ adoption of resolution urging the declaration of climate emergency
MANILA, 1 December 2020 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) lauded the recent adoption by the House of Representatives in plenary of a Resolution by the Committee on Climate Change to declare a climate and environmental emergency in support of the continuing efforts of the government to address the worsening impacts of the climate crisis.   House Resolution No. 1377, introduced by House Committee on Climate Change chair and Bohol 1st District Representative Edgar Chatto; Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda, the late Cebu City 1st District Representative Raul Del Mar; Lanao del Sur 2nd District Representative Yasser Alonto Balindong; Masbate 2nd District Representative Elisa Kho; Negros Oriental 1st District Representative Jocelyn Sy Limkaichong; Bayan Muna Representative Eufemia Cullamat; and CWS Representative Romeo Momo, Sr. urged the declaration of a climate and environmental emergency, ensuring enhanced and coherent climate actions in the executive and legislative agenda of the government.   “A global campaign to declare a "Climate Emergency" started as early as 2003, in recognition of the intensifying complications brought about by global warming and climate change, and of the corresponding needs and implications to accelerate actions, including investments and mobilization of resources. The key elements of the campaign include the building of public awareness as acknowledgement of the threats of such emergency, the declaration of a climate emergency by governments to trigger societal actions, and demand for mobilization at a sufficient scale and speed, considering the urgency of implementation of such actions,” HR No. 1377 reads.   “In declaring a climate emergency, the government admits that global warming exists and that the measures taken up to this point are not enough to limit the changes brought by it. The decision stresses the need for the government and administration to devise measures that try and stop human-caused global warming,” it added.   HR No. 1377 gave full recognition to the CCC’s National Panel of Technical Experts’ (NPTE) call to shift from using the term “climate change” to “climate emergency” to pursue immediate action against global warming. The NPTE, currently chaired by Dr. Carlos Primo David of the University of the Philippines National Institute of Geological Sciences, had recommended that “as one of the most climatically vulnerable countries in the world, the Philippines should mobilize its people, institutions and resources to enhance its ability to prepare and even prosper amidst the climate emergency.”   Further, HR No. 1377 mandates itself to:  Encourage that climate urgency be placed at the center of all policy decision-making from local to national level; Encourage local governments to issue Climate Change Declarations within their respective jurisdictions; Call on the Climate Change Commission to spearhead the collection and consolidation of relevant data with national government agencies as well as local government units, in collaboration with the National Panel of Technical Experts, to come up with a climate risk assessment of the country, to produce baseline studies that consider future scenarios and impacts of climate change, to perform sustainable development and resilient investment planning, programming and financing at the national, sectoral, and local levels; Call on the major carbon emitters, locally and abroad, to take responsibility for climate change and to reinvest in renewable and sustainable energy; Call on local governments to adopt a "No to Coal" or "No to New Coal Policy" within their respective jurisdictions; Call on local industries and local government units to pursue renewable and sustainable energy sources; Conduct an audit of relevant national government agencies and local government units in relation to their compliance to existing environmental, climate, disaster risk reduction and management and appropriation laws, and international agreements in light of the climate and environmental emergency with the end in view of ensuring an enhanced national monitoring and evaluation system for the implementation of these laws and warranting the accountability of government officials, private entities and other involved stakeholders; and Enjoin national government agencies to promote convergence of efforts toward strengthening data science, technology development, and research for climate change adaptation and mitigation, including the establishment of a national integrated risk information system and a national loss and damage registry, to support science-based policy formulation and risk governance at national and sub-national levels. Earlier this year, the call for a nationwide declaration of climate emergency was also adopted by national government agencies in the Cabinet Cluster for Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation and Disaster Risk Reduction (CCAM-DRR), in recognition of HR No. 535 authored by Albay Province 2nd District Representative Joey Salceda.   In his previous State of the Nation Addresses, President Rodrigo Roa Duterte expressed in categorical terms that addressing climate change was a key focus of his administration and would continue to be a top priority. This was followed by his stronger expression of resolve in his address to the 2020 UN General Assembly and at the recent 37th Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit where he called on other vulnerable countries, along with the Philippines, to demand climate justice and urge developed nations to rapidly cut their carbon emissions which are the most responsible for fueling the climate crisis. He also asked the international community to keep their commitments to the goals of the Paris Agreement.   The Climate Change Commission, as the lead policy-making body of the government for coordinating, monitoring and evaluating climate change programs and policies, underscores the need for the Philippines, being one of the most climate-vulnerable nations, to heighten the capacity of its people to survive amidst the climate emergency by mobilizing its people, institutions and resources.
December 01, 2020 Tuesday
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Practice Sustainable Gardening of Ornamental Plants – Legarda
Sanggumay orchids, Waling-waling (Vanda sanderiana), and Doña Aurora are among the endemic and native plants here in the Philippines. Photo from the presentation of ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity Executive Director Dr. Theresa Mundita Lim. MANILA, 30 November 2020 — Plant experts gathered virtually to underscore the importance of responsible gardening brought by the rising trend of collecting ornamental plants, and the possible environmental consequences and dangers of inaccurate wild plant harvesting to Philippine forests and biodiversity during the 27th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” with the topic, “Plant Wise: Responsible Gardening.”   The online conversation hosted by Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda featured Dr. Theresa Mundita Lim, Executive Director of the ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity; Dr. Ireneo Lit Jr., entomologist, and curator of the University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB) Museum of Natural History; and Dr. Gideon Lasco, a medical anthropologist from the University of the Philippines Diliman and a research fellow at the Ateneo de Manila Development Studies Program;   Dr. Lasco shared the intricate relationship of humans with plants, highlighting that people have allowed plants to take deeper root, occupying a big part of their daily routines and living spaces.   “Plants also serve as links to the past: plants are “portable trees” that humans can carry along with them in their life journeys, from house to house, from generation to generation. At a time when our very vitality seems imperiled by a deadly pandemic, plants offer an alternate vision of life: one of growth and germination. However, it remains to be seen if this will translate to environmental awareness and action,” said Dr. Lasco.   Dr. Lim discussed the value of planting and growing endemic and native species and the dangers of a thriving plant economy, and showed different over-collected endemic native plant species.   “Dahil sa pagtaas ng mga presyo ng halaman, dumadami ang pumupunta sa mga bundok para manguha ng mga halaman sa ating mga kagubatan. Ang hindi nakikita ng mga tao ay yung ating mga forests ay hindi lang isang klase, 10 types ‘yan. Tumaas ang poaching, sa iba't ibang mga forests ay binubunot ang mga halaman tapos ay ibinibenta. Ang Pilipinas, mataas ang endemicity o yung sinasabing mga halaman na nakikita lang dito sa Pilipinas,” said by Dr. Lim.   Dr. Lit introduced the different invasive non-native species of plants, their negative effects on other plants and the environment, and the proper ways to handle and take care of them.   “Ang pag-aalaga ng halaman ay katulad ng pag-aalaga ng “pets” o alagang aso o pusa. Dapat responsable tayo. Yung aso, hindi inaalpasan kapag nagsawa ka na o hindi mo na kayang alagaan. Ganun din ang mga halaman, babantayan natin,” said by Dr. Lit.   In the episode, Legarda said that due to the community quarantine, many Filipinos have turned to ornamental plant gardening as a way to cope with stress and uncertainty. However, the global and local circulation of plants comes with a significant ecological footprint, and so do all the materials used to tend to them like plastic pots, pesticides, packages used for transport, among others.   “While ornamental plant gardening makes coping with the pandemic a little easier for many people, it is also important to be aware of the threats it poses to the environment, including plant poaching, wildlife trading, and unbridled profiteering,” she added.   “Gardening ornamental plants come with the responsibility of practicing sustainable ways of tending them and making sure that the habitats where they are sourced remain unharmed, so as to not disturb ecosystems that are unique to the Philippines,” Legarda concluded.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
November 30, 2020 Monday
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PH Legislators, CVF Ambassador and Deputy Speaker Legarda Urge Creation of CVF Parliamentary League
MANILA, 26 November 2020 — In the Inaugural Global Parliamentarians Meeting of the Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF) held yesterday, high-level representation from the Philippine Senate and House of Representatives were united in the call for stronger engagement among lawmakers of 48 climate-vulnerable countries in light of the climate crisis.   Senate President Vicente Sotto III, House Speaker Lord Allan Jay Velasco, Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda, and House Committee on Climate Change Chair and Bohol 1st District Representative Edgar Chatto called for the creation of a CVF Parliamentary League as a dedicated cooperation platform to advance a common legislative agenda for integrating climate change adaptation and mitigation and disaster risk reduction in all facets of sustainable development pursuits.   “Enabling our people to survive and prosper in this era of climate change and the pandemic is a moral imperative. We may be vulnerable. Our nations may be at most risk. But together, we can be a powerful force that could drive the global transformation we seek for a safer, healthier, and more sustainable future.” said Senate President Sotto in his remarks.   “The Philippine Nationally Determined Contributions we have set shows the world our resolve to pursue low-carbon development, as well as the support we need from developed countries in terms of climate finance, capacity-building, and technology transfer in the context of climate justice and in accordance with the Paris Agreement,” said House Speaker Velasco.   “We must organize our efforts regionally. It will be our platform for exchanging experiences and good practices on climate action, developing a common stand on critical climate legislation, and strengthening our cooperation in championing the 1.5 Paris goal,” said Legarda. As CVF Ambassador for Parliaments, Legarda also serves as UNDRR Global Champion for Resilience and Board Member in the Global Center on Adaptation, which co-organized the webinar.   “We must influence more, and we must do what we can, because we must, and because solidarity and hope are what will in the end prevail. Through our shared leadership and with far greater urgency, we can hasten the transition of our countries to decarbonized development and ensure a safer, more equitable, and more resilient future for our people,” Legarda added.   Legarda cited massive damages from typhoons that continue to hit the Philippines, the most recent one being typhoon Vamco in November alone, which affected almost four million Filipinos and caused damages to agriculture worth 87 million US dollars and to infrastructure worth 181 million US dollars.   Legarda said that hard-fought development gains and productivity will continue to be undermined, or worse, reversed, if the 1.5 global warming threshold of the Paris Agreement will be breached.   “In light of these intensifying impacts of the climate crisis, we are required to do much more. If countries historically responsible for the climate crisis won’t act with urgency, we in the developing world must act in concert to compel them to take action—to take the lead in deep and drastic cuts in carbon emissions,” Legarda said.   Legarda expressed that vulnerable country parliaments play a crucial role in enhancing countries' Nationally Determined Contributions and in demonstrating climate leadership.   “Using our oversight, legislative, and representation functions, we must take a far more active role in helping steer our peoples away from the dire threats of the climate emergency. I am certain we have all been equal to the task before and I am even more sure now we will be equal to the rough tests ahead of us,” Legarda added.   Coinciding with the meeting was the plenary adoption of House Resolution No. 1377, Resolution Calling for a Climate and Environmental Emergency, sponsored by House Special Committee on Climate Change Chair and Bohol 1st District Representative Edgar Chatto.   The Climate Vulnerable Forum is an international partnership of 48 countries highly vulnerable to a warming planet and serving as a South-South cooperation platform of nations for global climate action. The online meeting was convened in cooperation with the Inter-Parliamentary Union and Global Center on Adaptation.   Other CVF Ambassadors are H.E. Mohamed Nasheed, Speaker of the People’s Majlis and former President of the Maldives; and MP Saber Chowdhury, Honorary President of the IPU and Chair of the Parliamentary Standing Committee in the Ministry of Environment Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) of Bangladesh.
November 26, 2020 Thursday
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Legarda: Build a resilient recovery for the Philippines
MANILA, 25 November 2020 — House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda recommended stronger policy measures to help avert future loss and damage and ensure sustainable and resilient recovery, in light of the escalating climate-related disaster risks, compounded by factors caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.   In a privilege speech before the House plenary, Legarda said that the recent back-to-back typhoons that hit provinces in the Luzon and Visayas regions affected more than 6.7 million Filipinos and damaged over 35 billion pesos worth of infrastructure and agriculture.   She also noted that the amount of rainfall brought by the typhoons and the volume of water released by dams and the environmental degradation of the Sierra Madre range as a natural buffer against tropical cyclones have worsened the level of flooding in the affected areas.   Legarda recently filed House Resolution No. 1363 directing the House Sub-Committee on the New Normal to conduct an inquiry on the massive flooding caused by Typhoon Ulysses, in relation to the enforcement of environmental, climate change adaptation and mitigation, and disaster risk reduction and management laws by government agencies and local government units (LGUs).   The resolution also seeks to identify gaps in mainstreaming disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation in development, investment, and land use planning.   Legarda noted that the track of Typhoon Ulysses was almost the same as Ondoy. In terms of rainfall amount, 347 millimeters of Ondoy rains fell within six hours as compared to the 356 millimeters of rains from Ulysses for the whole day on November 12.   She added that other factors led to Ondoy-level flooding during Ulysses, such as land use, construction of settlements and cultivation in flood-prone areas; excessive rainfall due to climate change; and siltation of waterways due to excessive soil erosion because of illegal logging and deforestation.   She also mentioned that poor or non-implementation of the Ecological Solid Waste Management Law also contributed as seen in the huge amounts of plastic debris floating on water. The law, which she principally authored and sponsored in the Senate, mandates the proper segregation of waste at source and the establishment of materials recovery facility within LGUs.   Among the recommendations she noted in the resolution were to:  Regularly declog canals, roadside ditches, and drains, as well as supplement traditional flood mitigation projects, such as river dredging, dike construction, and tree planting upstream, with natural flood intervention programs, such as river and floodplain restoration; Pursue landscape and ecosystem-based comprehensive development and land use planning informed by geohazard maps and risk assessments;  Ensure that geohazard maps are updated to take into account current and projected climate hazards and are well-understood by LGUs, and provide a basis to consider measures based on their assessment of these risks; and Determine areas for improvement in the capability and agility of PAGASA’s systems for climate observation and projection, weather forecasting, and real-time climate information dissemination to dam operators, national government agencies, LGUs, academe, and research institutions; as well as for translating scientific climate information into more relatable messages of potential impacts for more effective risk communication down to the last mile.  “While PAGASA provided timely and accurate scientific information about typhoon Ulysses, this did not translate to how people imagined the typhoon would be. Scientific information must be understandable, actionable, and relatable,” Legarda stated.   As a Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF) Ambassador for Parliaments and UNISDR Global Champion for Resilience, Legarda voiced out the need to accelerate and scale up support for vulnerable developing countries like the Philippines in the areas of finance, green technology, and capacity development to build resilience against extreme weather events that are attributed to continued rising emissions of greenhouse gases mostly from industrialized nations.   “To make adaptation truly work for us requires efforts not just among us but from the international community, and both the public and the private sectors, to bring about the needed investments to enable genuine resilience,” Legarda stressed.   In closing, Legarda said that resilience should be all about empowering the people not merely with inspiration but with the right tools and the means to be able to decide and take action, for them not to be defenseless.   “We have described Filipinos as resilient or tenacious in the face of these many disasters that come our way, as if resilience is purely based on spirit and determination. As if wading through neck-deep floodwater, waiting for hours on top of your house to be rescued, or just generally enduring one typhoon after another, is resilience in itself,” Legarda said.   “As leaders of our nation, we are accountable to the people we serve. More lives are at stake, especially in this era of the climate crisis made more challenging by COVID-19. Our decisions and actions will have an impact on our communities and our nation,” Legarda concluded.
November 25, 2020 Wednesday
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Responsible Gardening in 27th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 24 November 2020 — Plant experts will gather virtually to underscore the importance of responsible gardening brought by the rising trend of collecting ornamental plants on the 27th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” with the topic, “Plant Wise: Responsible Gardening.”   The episode, hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 26 November 2020, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/conglorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are Dr. Gideon Lasco, medical anthropologist from the University of the Philippines Diliman and a research fellow at the Ateneo de Manila University's Development Studies Program; Dr. Theresa Mundita Lim, Executive Director of the ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity; and Dr. Ireneo Lit Jr., entomologist and curator of the University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB) Museum of Natural History.   In previous episodes, the online series tackled food gardening and saving seeds, permaculture, good nutrition and diet, planting native trees, practical sustainability, narrating risk to resilience stories through books, tree pest, and disease management, reviving indigenous textiles and crafts, transforming waste into wages, sustainable urban mobility, and food waste reduction and management.   The upcoming episode will focus on the rising popularity of collecting ornamental plants. With more than six months of community quarantine, many Filipinos have turned to ornamental plant gardening as a hobby or to cope up with stress. However, the global and local circulation of plants comes with a significant ecological footprint, and so do all the materials used to tend to them like plastic pots, pesticides, packages used for transport, among others.   While ornamental plant gardening makes coping with the pandemic a little easier for many people, it is also important to be aware of the threats it poses to the environment, including plant poaching, wildlife trading, and unbridled profiteering.   Gardening ornamental plants come with the responsibility of practicing sustainable ways of tending them and making sure that the habitats where they are sourced remain unharmed, so as to not disturb ecosystems that are unique to the Philippines.   This episode will raise awareness on the possible environmental consequences and dangers of inaccurate wild plant harvesting to the Philippines’ native natural forests and biodiversity.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
November 24, 2020 Tuesday
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Legarda Seeks House Inquiry on Ulysses Floods, Enforcement of Environment and Climate Laws
MANILA, 19 November 2020 — House Deputy Speaker and Lone District of Antique Representative Loren Legarda today filed Resolution No. 1363 at the House of Representatives directing the House Subcommittee on the New Normal to conduct an inquiry on the massive flooding caused by typhoon Ulysses in relation to the enforcement of environmental, climate change adaptation and mitigation, and disaster risk reduction and management laws by government agencies and local government units (LGUs).   The resolution also seeks a review on protocols followed by dam operators to ensure that measures are adjusted to climate risk scenarios, including pre-emptive safe discharge of water, and linked to effective early warning systems for communities at risk of floods down to the last mile, in order to prevent loss of lives, properties, and livelihoods.   Legarda aims to recommend stronger policy measures that will help avert future loss and damage and ensure sustainable and resilient recovery, in light of the escalating  climate-related disaster risks, compounded by factors caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.   In the resolution, Legarda stated that “the massive loss and damage of the Philippines in October to November this year from back-to-back typhoons and weather disturbances, and from other extreme weather events that wreaked havoc in the country in recent years, shows that climate change is a clear and present threat to the country's poverty reduction and other sustainable development goals.”   The resolution urges national government agencies and local government units to promptly mainstream disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation in their development, investment, and land use planning.   Legarda stressed that poor drainage systems and garbage disposal aggravate the impacts of the typhoons.   Through this resolution, the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) and LGUs are recommended to regularly declog canals, roadside ditches, and drains. It also suggests that traditional flood mitigation projects, such as river dredging, dike construction, and tree planting upstream, should  be supplemented by natural flood intervention programs, such as river and floodplain restoration.   It also mandates the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) to determine areas for improvement of its capability and the agility of its systems for climate observation and projection, weather forecasting, and real-time climate information dissemination to dam operators, national government agencies, LGUs, academe, and research institutions; and translate scientific climate information into more relatable messages of potential impacts for more effective risk communication.   LGUs are also encouraged to have a landscape and ecosystem-based comprehensive development and land use planning informed by geohazard maps and climate and disaster risk assessments. The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), through its Mines and Geosciences Bureau, is mandated to ensure that geohazard maps are updated to take into account current and projected climate hazards and are well-understood by LGUs, and provide basis to consider measures to “protect, retreat, or accommodate” based on assessment of risk.   “Despite the enactment of landmark policies on the environment, climate change, and disaster risk reduction and management, there is still continued decline of the state of the environment. Challenges arising from poor urban governance, vulnerable rural livelihoods, and ecosystems decline drive disaster risks and poverty in the context of climate change and cause loss and suffering for millions of Filipinos,” Legarda emphasized.
November 19, 2020 Thursday
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Transforming Food Supply Chain in 26th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 18 November 2020 — Small-scale agriculture advocates will gather virtually to underscore the importance of supporting small farmers, reducing food loss and waste, feeding the hungry, and keeping the local food supply chain functioning and resilient to shocks on the 26th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” with the topic, “Transforming Supply Chain.”   The episode, hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 19 November 2020, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/conglorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are: Ace and Andie Estrada, founders of Rural Rising PH; Iloisa Diga, co-founder of Session Groceries; and Tracey Santiago, Founder of Sustainable Sagada.   In previous episodes, the online series tackled food gardening and saving seeds, permaculture, good nutrition and diet, planting native trees, practical sustainability, narrating risk to resilience stories through books, tree pest and disease management, reviving indigenous textiles and crafts, transforming waste into wages, championing sustainable urban mobility, and food waste reduction and management.   This episode will recognize private sector initiatives to support distressed farmers and link farmers to consumers amid the pandemic and toward a better normal.   According to an SWS survey conducted in September 2020, families who hunger due to lack of food to eat reached a record-high of 30.7 percent, equivalent to 7.6 million households.   Meanwhile, farmers struggle to sell their produce due to movement restrictions since the imposition of community quarantine, forcing them to throw away fresh food that could have fed people in need without further hurting farm finances.   As the country battles the coronavirus pandemic, food security challenges are expected to persist, worsened by the onslaught of Typhoon Ulysses that resulted in at least P2.137 billion in agricultural damages.   The upcoming episode will raise awareness on identifying strategies to improve the sustainability of local food supply chains and reduce food loss and waste, as well as encouraging the audiences and local communities to buy locally-grown food.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
November 18, 2020 Wednesday
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CCC Welcomes Approval of USD1B of Green Climate Fund Projects, Seeks Faster Accreditation of Direct Access Entities
MANILA, 16 NOVEMBER 2020 — Following the 27th Meeting of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) Board held virtually from November 9 to 13, 2020, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) welcomed the approval of the Philippines as a participating country in Climate Investor One, an innovative blended finance facility managed by Climate Fund Managers and providing an integrated, full project life cycle financing solution to support the development, construction and commissioning of renewable energy projects more expeditiously and at reduced cost. The project is set to deploy USD 100 million capital in a total of 18 countries for historic and new renewable energy projects The Board also approved 16 new projects by developing countries all over the world, amounting to over one billion US dollars, intended to finance climate adaptation and mitigation initiatives.  The CCC also welcomed the accreditation of four new Accredited Entities (AEs) or partner organizations, ranging from country organizations called Direct Access Entities (DAEs), to regional and multi-national bodies. AEs submit funding proposals and act as a conduit of GCF funds as they implement climate projects approved and funded by the GCF.    Climate Change Commissioner Rachel Herrera, sitting as Alternate Member in the GCF Board, delivers her intervention seeking for faster accreditation for Direct Access Entities or GCF partner organizations at the national or local level, during the 27th GCF Board Meeting held from November 9-13, 2020. CCC Commissioner Rachel Herrera, who sits as Alternate Member in the GCF Board representing the Asia-Pacific constituency, appreciated the Board’s accreditation of the new AEs—three of which are DAEs—but also noted that it is still too low in enabling stronger country ownership for developing countries. In the case of the Philippines, only the Land Bank of the Philippines has completed the process of approval as DAE for GCF. “We continue to express our concern that AEs spend an average of 21.1 months from application towards approval—with one DAE taking up to 30 months, which are 30 months’ worth of time and resources lost,” Herrera said.  “The direct access modality is designed to help developing countries exercise ownership of finance, align these with national climate action plans, and not the least, build the needed capacity within our national institutions for climate projects. We articulate these points to push for concrete ways to address persistent challenges, so that more DAEs go through a shorter accreditation period and will encourage more applicants to find more clarity and efficiency in the process,” Herrera added. The CCC said that the GCF is the world’s largest climate fund that aims to foster a paradigm shift towards low emission, climate resilient development pathways in developing countries. The GCF serves the Paris Agreement and is governed by a Board that has equal representation from developing and developed countries. The CCC also noted that the 27th GCF Board Meeting raises the GCF’s total portfolio to USD7.2 billion and that the value of the approved projects for 2020 alone is over USD2 billion—a record year for GCF programming. GCF Executive Director Yannick Glemarec said that project agreements for four projects were immediately signed upon their approval at the Board Meeting, showing how quickly they are moving to approve and implement vital projects and programs in developing countries. “GCF has stepped up its operations this year in spite of the global pandemic, and is providing more support to developing countries than ever as we help them to build a low-emission, climate-resilient recovery. The ambitious work programme the Board has approved for 2021 will give further momentum to making our operations more efficient and more effective,” Glemarec said. 
November 16, 2020 Monday
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CCC, OML Center unveil youth film entries for Klima Film Festival
MANILA, 14 November 2020 — After a series of mentoring sessions and film production workshops for the initial 52 youth teams from across 14 regions of the country that signed up for the Klima Film Festival (KFF), 17 are able to submit their film entries for the festival. Below is the list of film entries, which are now undergoing eligibility and technical quality review:   • Baktas - Impulse Production (Region X) • Drawings - Big Ship Productions (National Capital Region) • Grow My Mind - Zealous Productions (Region III) • Jeremiah at ang Bayan ng Gomorrah - VIP Production (Region IV-A) • Liham - Pelikularal Productions (National Capital Region) • Litrato - IA Visuals (Cordillera Administrative Region) • Manalas - Salidahan Productions (Region VIII) • Ni Sierra ken ti Kayo ti Biag - Samtoy Productions (Region I) • Our World - Aquarian Eye Media (Region III) • Pahimatngon - Bernal Production (Region VIII) • Pamilya Niño - Maya Productions (National Capital Region) • Resilience - South Frame Visuals (National Capital Region) • Respicio-Respado - CDC Production (Region II) • Si Hiraya at ang Diwa - Sinagtala (Region IV-A) • Tagam - Plaza Films Production (Region VIII) • Tinig - Prima Lente (National Capital Region) • Verdant - Ang Maharlika Productions (Region VIII)   The Movie and Television Review and Classification Board (MTRCB), led by Chairperson Maria Rachel Arenas, will review and classify the entries.   From these 17 entries, ten (10) films that will be able to comply with the mechanics and submission requirements will be shortlisted and advance to the KFF Screening on November 19-24 and the KFF Awards on November 25, as part of the celebration of the 13th annual Global Warming and Climate Change Consciousness Week.   These ten entries will be accessible worldwide for free through the iWant TFC, the Official Media Partner for the Klima Film Festival.   Winning teams will also receive trophies sponsored by the Support CCC II Project implemented by the CCC and GIZ with funding from the German Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU).   The Klima Film Festival is an initiative by the Climate Change Commission and the Oscar M. Lopez Center in order to increase awareness and understanding on climate change through films, while also featuring the skills and talents of young Filipino filmmakers on climate action.
November 15, 2020 Sunday
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CCC calls for increased government-business sector collaboration to usher green development
MANILA, 13 November 2020 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) calls for  increased collaborative work for the government and private business sector in ushering a paradigm shift toward low-carbon and climate-resilient development.   CCC Secretary Emmanuel M. de Guzman said that the climate emergency must inspire radical action both from the public and the private sector, in the same manner as the COVID-19 pandemic response.   “The current Covid-19 pandemic and the prevailing climate emergency are both rooted in the world’s current economic model of pursuing infinite growth at the expense of our planet on which our survival depends,” he said during the Manila Times Virtual Forum held on Wednesday, November 11.   De Guzman cited the recent two powerful typhoons Rolly and Quinta, which left numerous casualties and millions in destroyed crops and infrastructure in the Bicol Region. The recovery and reconstruction efforts in affected areas are put on hold as residents brace for another tropical storm that is projected to further intensify into a typhoon before making landfall   “There is no more time to waste. We must immediately pursue the integration and coherence of private and public sector strategies for climate change adaptation and mitigation, disaster risk reduction, and sustainable development,” De Guzman stressed.   De Guzman stressed the role of international climate negotiations and national policies which mainstream climate change adaptation and mitigation to address the problem of climate change. He said that reducing carbon emissions entails the exponential scaling up of renewable energy systems, energy efficiency, electrification of transport systems, and improvements of industrial and building efficiency on a global scale.   “Despite our country’s insignificant emissions of less than half of one percent of global emissions, the burden of prevalent poverty, and the recurring economic losses from climate change impacts, we are resolved to pursue a low-carbon development pathway,” he affirmed.   De Guzman also mentioned the policy initiatives from the other agencies of the government – such as the sustainability reporting guidelines for publicly listed companies issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission; sustainable finance policy framework approved by the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, and the moratorium on new coal-fired power plants which will be issued by the Department of Energy –  which shall be articulated in the country’s first Nationally Determined Contributions or NDC under the Paris Agreement, which is now being developed and finalized through a whole-of-government-and-society approach.   “The NDC is the articulation of the country’s investment strategy in pursuit of climate-resilient and low carbon development. It defines also which transformational measures are conditional or contingent on the climate finance support of developed countries,” De Guzman said.   The  Secretary also emphasized that the policies, frameworks, and regulations of the government will not be successful without the support and cooperation of the private sector. He enumerated several possible areas of cooperation between the public and the private sector in the pursuit of sustainable and green development – such as promoting risk-informed and science-based development planning; mainstreaming climate change and disaster resilience in the businesses’ investment and operational planning; promoting sustainable urban planning and development; developing and promoting disaster risk financing tools; and social preparations for the low-carbon transition and the exponential transformation of all sectors towards a green economy.   De Guzman mentioned that these climate solutions are now often cheaper and provide greater economic returns than higher-carbon alternatives, opposite from the mistaken assumption before that climate actions are inevitably costly to those that pursue them.   “Such thinking only empowers those who stand to benefit from delay and inaction by propounding the notion that climate action conflicts with critical economic, development, and public welfare priorities. We now know that reality is very much different. What is good for the planet is good for business,” De Guzman said.
November 13, 2020 Friday
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Message for the Philippine Clean Air Month
 
November 10, 2020 Tuesday
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CCC lauds mandatory bike lanes in all new roads, calls for sustainable and equitable mobility systems for cleaner air
MANILA, 10 November 2020 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) called for the development and implementation of functional and sustainable urban mobility plans in observance of Philippine Clean Air Month.   Presidential Proclamation No. 1109, s. 1997 declares the month of November of every year as “Clean Air Month Through National Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance Consciousness.” Consistent with the Republic Act No. 8749 or the Philippine Clean Air Act of 1999, the observance aims to create awareness and to encourage the motoring public to take positive steps to help improve air quality.   A report from the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air (CREA) and Greenpeace Philippines laid down recommendations to reduce air pollution post-COVID-19 in order to safeguard people’s health and ensure a better normal.   According to the report, vehicles are a major source of air pollution, accounting for 65% of air pollution in the country, primarily in Metro Manila. Air pollution is also expected to increase given the projected 4.6% annual growth rate in energy demand. This is consistent with the projected increase of road vehicles to 24.8 million by 2030, compared to a baseline of 6.6 million in 2010.   As a measure to greatly improve mobility in cities is a key solution to the problem, the Department of Public Works and Highways has issued Department Administrative Order No. 88, s. 2020.  This is seen as a transformational shift in infrastructure planning and design towards a climate-friendly mass public transport system and an effective investment to enable shared mobility, walking, and cycling, as the report recommends.   The CCC echoes these recommendations by encouraging cities and citizens to adopt greener modes of transportation to commute in this period of pandemic and climate crisis, and promoting inclusive urban mobility solutions as part of the country’s post-pandemic recovery.   The imposed community quarantine across the country had already given us a glimpse of what cities can be like with vastly improved air quality. But months later, with the easing of regulations and the return of motor vehicles on the road, air pollution is gradually making a comeback.   With this, the agency also urges local government units themselves to establish dedicated, protected, and connected bike lanes with green spaces to link cities as well as nearby provinces and encourage more Filipinos to choose healthier and sustainable ways to commute.   The CCC believes that having access to these safe and functional types of mobility systems and non-motorized mainstream modes of transportation will open doors for effective air quality, climate, and environment management which will benefit the present and the future generations. 
November 10, 2020 Tuesday
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Reduce food waste, embrace slow food movement in support of sustainable consumption and production
MANILA, 9 November 2020 — Slow food enthusiasts underscored the importance of food waste reduction and management during the 25th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” with the topic “Waste Not, Want Not: A Food Waste Episode with Slow Food Manila.”   The online conversation hosted by Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda featured restaurateurs including Chef Kalel Demetrio, co-owner of Agimat Foraging Bar and Kitchen; Chef Waya Wijangco, owner of Gourmet Gypsy Art Café; and Chef Robby Goco, owner of Cyma Restaurants, who shared how they implement sustainable consumption and production in their restaurants and highlighted the importance of managing food waste.   Chef Demetrio, known as a “Liquid Maestro”, introduced the basics of foraging, as a way of processing indigenous ingredients into food, drinks, or condiments. He works with the local farmers, and uses low-technology and indigenous knowledge to make products from the unusual and rare fruits and vegetables so it will not be wasted.   “Back in the days kasi, everything is foraging. There are no groceries and fast food chains, so we tend to create everything on our own. In the modern times, we see the beauty of foraging kasi nakikita natin na it is unadulterated and all ingredients can be found in nature. Alam mo ‘yong quality kasi ikaw mismo ang nagtanim... unlike getting something from the grocery, it is an endgame na kaagad kasi it is already a by-product,” said Demetrio.   Chef Wijangco, a staunch advocate for inclusive employment, small enterprise, and support for local farmers,environmental conservation, tourism development, and education, shared how Gourmet Gypsy Art Café applied the rules of Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle into the daily food preparation and other processes in their restaurant.   “Sustainability is a way of life. It requires mindfulness, consideration for others, the environment we live in, and the communities we interact with. It takes a lot of work and commitment, but it is the kind of effort that truly makes our world a better place to live in,” said Wijangco.   Chef Goco, fascinated by creating something out of nothing, has been innovating by using the entire animal kingdom, or ingredients from nose to tail and from roots to seeds, to make dishes for his restaurants. He explained the basics of menu costing and their back of house control points. He showed some dishes made from unused parts of meat and vegetables. He also demonstrated how to make tomato paste from overripe tomatoes, which are usually thrown away.   "As a chef owning 12 restaurants, ang pinaka importante sa lahat is when I go to the restaurant, I check the garbage kung ano ang laman, kasi pag may nakita akong produkto na hindi dapat nasa basurahan, I call the manager and tell them, "why are you not efficiently using your ingredients?" Because my secret is, if I know at the end of the evening na malinis ang basurahan ko, then I know my business is profitable dahil hindi ako nagtatapon," said Goco.   Legarda, as an advocate of slow food and circular economy, showed several photos of the foods she prepared from the ingredients taken from her own home garden.   “We promote the concept of sustainability in our lives so that we can use our natural resources in a way that it is not wasted, or depleted. In this way, we teach ourselves to live properly and with respect for our nature,” said Legarda.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
November 09, 2020 Monday
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Message on the observance of National Environmental Awareness Month
 
November 04, 2020 Wednesday
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Effective food waste management in the 25th Episode of “Stories for a Better Normal” Series
MANILA, 03 November 2020 — Slow food enthusiasts will gather virtually to underscore the importance of food, and its waste reduction and management, on the 25th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” with the topic “Waste Not, Want Not: A Food Waste Episode with Slow Food Manila.” The episode, hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 05 November 2020, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/conglorenlegarda.   Chefs and restaurant owners will join the online conversation, including Kalel Demetrio, co-owner of Agimat Foraging Bar and Kitchen; Chef Waya Wijangco, owner of Gourmet Gypsy Art Café; and Chef Robby Goco, owner of Cyma Restaurants.   According to the World Wildlife Fund-Philippines, Filipinos waste about 308,000 tons of rice every year. In Metro Manila alone, an estimated 2,175 tons of food scraps end up in trash bins on a daily basis. Much of this wasted food come from restaurants.   In previous episodes, the online series tackled food gardening and saving seeds, permaculture, good nutrition and diet, youth climate activism, planting native trees, practical sustainability, narrating risk to resilience stories through books, tree pest and disease management, Panay Island ecology, reviving indigenous textiles and crafts, transforming waste into wages, and sustainable urban mobility.   This upcoming episode will feature restaurateurs who will share their knowledge on the adverse effects of food wastage and how their respective restaurants effectively manage their food waste in support of sustainable consumption and production.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
November 03, 2020 Tuesday
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Message on the observance of World Cities Day
October 31, 2020 Saturday
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Support traditional culture, sustainable livelihoods of IP communities
MANILA, 30 October 2020 — Representatives from indigenous peoples (IP) groups featured their unique ways of preserving culture and heritage and called for more support to enhance their resilience to the pandemic and climate impacts, during the 24th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways.”   The online conversation hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda featured indigenous and cultural advocates, including Waway L. Saway, member of the Talaandig in Bukidnon and Head of the Family Food Security Cycle program of Hineleban Foundation; Delia Pauden, Cluster Head of Ati in Antique and Aklan; and Renee Talavera, Head of the Cultural Communities and Traditional Arts of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA).   Dedicated in celebration of the National Indigenous Peoples’ Month this October and the 23rd anniversary of the passage of the Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA) of 1997, the episode aimed to raise awareness on the interventions needed from all sectors to further promote traditional culture and rural livelihoods of IP groups and communities.   Mr. Saway, an international-renowned artist for music and arts, introduced the Hineleban Foundation, which aims to secure Mindanao’s sources of water by reforesting the buffer zones surrounding the high mountain ranges and to provide sustainable livelihood options for the Bangsamoro and IPs of Mindanao. Rooted in the belief that neither the forest nor the people can thrive without the other, the foundation approaches its goal in three aspects—food security, sustainable livelihood, and reforestation. He also discussed how the various groups in Bukidnon and other areas in Mindanao converge to do sustainable rainforestation work, especially during this pandemic.   “Simula lamang ito dito sa Bukidnon, subalit ito ay gagawin natin sa buong Mindanao dahil ang Hineleban ay one of the key players of Mindanao rainforestation. Ibig sabihin nito, buong Mindanao ang ating ginagalawan, kasama na rito ang mga pamayanan ng mga kapatid nating Muslim,” said Saway.   Ms. Pauden, member of the Pandan-Ati organization that teaches dance, music, weaving and Ati language to the young members of Ati, shared how the government helped them in preserving their traditional culture and sustain their livelihoods,.   “Sa ngayon, unti-unti nang nawawala ‘yung tradisyon namin. But through Deputy Speaker Legarda and NCCA’s support, we’re praying and hoping na makatulong na maibalik ‘yung kultura at tradisyon namin,” said Pauden.   Ms. Talavera introduced the programs and projects for the IPs, such as Assistance to Artisans Program and School of Living Traditions (SLTs) to revitalize IP culture and heritage. SLTs are non-formal centers of learning in the communities where cultural masters transmit their knowledge and skills on a particular art, craft, and tradition to the young members of the community for their appreciation and learning.   “Ang SLTs, five years na nitong natutulungan ang communities hanggang sa maging sustainable na ang mga ito. Ganu’n din sa Assistance to Artisans, ang mga natulungan nito ay malaki ang pasasalamat dahil nari-reach natin kahit ‘yung mga nasa pinaka-liblib na lugar kung saan meron pala silang mga pangangailangan na hindi kaagad nila mailapit dahil mahirap ang sitwasyon. Dahil dito sa Assistance to Artisans program, maraming mga tao at mga komunidad ang napasaya, lalo na ngayong panahon ng pandemic, hindi tumigil ang ating mga programa at tuloy-tuloy pa rin tayo,” said Talavera.   Legarda showed several photos of her programs, activities, and projects for the IPs whom she considers as frontliners in the preservation of indigenous culture. She also reiterated the need to preserve the cultural wealth and heritage bestowed upon by the IP communities and their indigenous knowledge, systems, and practices. She also stressed the need to ensure that budgets allocated for IPs are properly utilized and spent to further protect their rights.   “There should be adequate safety protocols and support mechanisms in place for our IPs, the NCCA, and the NGOs we work with in the preservation of our indigenous culture and heritage. We also need to ensure that the budgets intended to support our IPs are used fully and efficiently. We should always respect the culture of our IPs. Huwag tayong gagamit ng kanilang kaalaman nang hindi nire-respeto ang kanilang karapatan, kultura, at kabuhayan,” Legarda concluded.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 30, 2020 Friday
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Suportahan ang Tradisyonal na Kultura, Sustenableng Kabuhayan sa Komunidad ng mga Katutubo   
MAYNILA, Ika-30 ng Oktubre taong 2020 — Nagpakita ng kanilang mga kakaibang pamamaraan sa pangangalaga ng kultura at pamanang yaman ang ilang kinatawan mula sa ating ating mga katutubo o Indigenous People (IP). Nananawagan sila ng karagdagang suporta para tuluyang mapabuti ang kanilang katatagan sa pandemya at epekto ng klima sa ika-24 na kabanata ng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways.”   Ang lingguhang online talakayan na pinangungunahan ni House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda ay dinaluhan ng mga tagapagtaguyod at tagapagsulong ng mga katutubo at kultura. Nandoon sina Waway L. Saway, miyembro ng tribong Talaandig ng Bukidnon at Pinuno ng Food Security Cycle Program ng Hineleban Foundation; si Delia Pauden, Cluster Head ng mga Tribong Ati ng Antique at Aklan; at si Renee Talavera, Pinuno ng Cultural Communities at Traditional Arts ng National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA).   Itinuon ang usapan sa pagdiriwang ng  National Indigenous Peoples’ Month ngayong Oktubre at sa ika-23 na anibersaryo ng pagkakapasa ng Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA) noong 1997. Ang special episode na ito ay naglalayong maiangat ang kamalayan sa mga dapat gawin ng iba’t ibang sektor ng lipunan para itaguyod ang tradisyunal na kultura at kabuhayan ng mga katutubo at ang kani-kanilang komunidad.     Si Waway, isang international-renowned artist sa musika at sining, ang siyang nagpakilala sa Hineleban Foundation. Ang Hineleban ay isang organisasyon na naglalayong masiguro ang pinagkukunang tubig sa sa Mindanao sa pamamagitan ng reforestation ng buffer zones na nakapalibot sa matataas at bulubunduking bahagi ng lugar para makapagbigay ng iba pang sustenableng pagkakakitaan sa Bangsamoro at iba pang mga katutubo. Batay sa paniniwalang maging ang gubat o ang tao man ay hindi kayang umusad at mabuhay nang nag-iisa, nakatuon ang layunin ng Hineleban Foundation sa tatlong aspeto – kasiguruhan sa pagkain, pagpapanatili ng kabuhayan at pagtatanim ng puno. Tinalakay din ni Waway kung paano nagkakaisang gumawa ang iba’t ibang grupo sa Bukidnon at ibang lugar sa Mindanao para magkaroon ng “sustainable rainforestation” lalung-lalo na ngayong may pandemya.   “Simula lamang ito dito sa Bukidnon, subalit ito ay gagawin natin sa buong Mindanao dahil ang Hineleban ay one of the key players of Mindanao rainforestation. Ibig sabihin nito, buong Mindanao ang ating ginagalawan, kasama na rito ang mga pamayanan ng mga kapatid nating Muslim,” dagdag ni Waway.   Si Delia Pauden, miyembro ng organisasyong Pandan-Ati na nagtuturo ng sayaw, musika, paghahabi at wikang Ati sa mga kabataang miyembro, ay nagbahagi kung paano sila tinulungan ng pamahalaan sa pangangalaga ng kanilang tradisyunal na kultura at pagpapanatili ng kabuhayan.   “Sa ngayon, unti-unti nang nawawala ‘yung tradisyon namin, ngunit sa pamamagitan ni Deputy Speaker Legarda at suporta ng  NCCA, nananalangin at umaasa kami na matulungang maibalik ang mga ito,” sabi ni Delia.   Mula sa National Commission for Culture and the Arts, ipinakilala ni Renee Talavera ang mga programa at proyekto para sa IPs tulad ng Assistance to Artisans Program at School of Living Traditions (SLTs) para buhaying muli ang katutubong kultura at pamanang yaman. Ang SLTs ay “non-formal centers of learning” sa mga pamayanan kung saan ibinabahagi ng cultural masters sa mga bata ang kanilang kaalaman at kakayahan sa partikular na art, craft at tradition para payamanin ang kanilang kaalaman at pagpapahalaga sa mga ito.   “Ang SLTs, five years na nitong natutulungan ang communities hanggang sa maging sustainable na ang mga ito. Ganu’n din sa Assistance to Artisans, ang mga natulungan nito ay malaki ang pasasalamat dahil nari-reach natin kahit ‘yung mga nasa pinakaliblib na lugar kung saan mayroon pala silang mga pangangailangan na hindi kaagad nila mailapit dahil mahirap ang sitwasyon. Dahil sa Assistance to Artisans program, maraming mga tao at mga komunidad ang napasaya, lalo na ngayong panahon ng pandemic. Hindi tumigil ang ating mga programa at tuloy-tuloy pa rin tayo,” paliwanag ni Renee.   Ipinakita naman ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda ang ilang mga larawan ng kanyang mga programa, gawain at proyekto para sa ating mga katutubo na itinuturing niya bilang frontliners sa pangangalaga ng katutubong kultura. Iginiit ng Congresswoman na kailangang pangalagaan ang kanilang katutubong kaalaman, sistema at kasanayan. Binigyang-diin niya na kailangang siguruhin na ang budget na inilaan para sa IPs ay nagagamit nang tama at ginagastos para mapalawig at maprotektahan ang kanilang mga karapatan.   “Kailangang magkaroon tayo ng sapat na safety protocols at support mechanisms para sa mga katutubo, ang NCCA at ang NGOs na katulong natin para alagaan ang ating katutubong kultura at pamanang yaman. Kailangan din nating masiguro na ang mga budget na inilalaan para suportahan mga katutubo ay nagagamit nang buo at nagagastos nang mahusay. Kailangan din nating irespeto ang kultura ng IPs. Huwag tayong gagamit ng kanilang kaalaman nang hindi nirerespeto ang kanilang karapatan, kultura at kabuhayan,” pagtatapos ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda.   Bilang isang online discussion na nagtataguyod sa kalusugan, kamalayan sa kapaligiran, at gawaing angkop sa klima,  ang “Stories for a Better Normal” ay naglalayong baguhin ang kaisipan ng mamamayan, mga pamilya at mga komunidad sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga pamamaraan kung paano magkakaroon at maipatutupad ang isang 'better normal' sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.    Ang online discussion na ito ay inorganisa mula sa pakikipagtulungan ng Tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) na sinusuportahan ng Institute for Climate at Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, at ng Mother Earth Foundation.
October 30, 2020 Friday
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Risk Management, Climate Tagging, Emissions Inventory Vital Components of Local Climate Planning – CCC
MANILA, 29 October 2020 — In the third session of the “Accelerated Climate Action and Transformation (ACT) Local Online Conference,” the Climate Change Commission (CCC) stressed the importance of climate risk management, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory, and climate budget tagging as critical components of local climate planning and action.   A four-part online webinar series organized by the CCC, the ACT Local Conference aims to capacitate higher education institutions (HEIs) from across the Philippine regions to provide technical assistance on climate science, issues, vulnerabilities, and risks to their respective local government units (LGUs) and communities, with the view of developming science-based and risk-informed local climate plans.   The HEIs who participated in the webinar are the following: Aklan State University, Ateneo de Davao – Law, Bulacan State University, Holy Name University, Iloilo Science and Technology University, Laguna State Polytechnic University, Leyte Normal University, Mariano Marcos State University, Mindanao State University- College of Forestry and Environment, Rizal Memorial Colleges – School of Law Davao, Southern Philippines Agribusiness and Marine and Aquatic School of Technology, St. Michael’s College- Laguna, Sultan Kudarat State University, University of Antique, University of the Philippines Visayas, and West Visayas State University.   CCC Assistant Secretary Romell Antonio O. Cuenca recognized the role of HEIs in building the capacities of our LGUs, particularly in providing assistance in crafting science-based and risk-informed Local Climate Change Action Plans (LCCAPs).   “Through today’s session, we hope to provide a strategy for you and your respective LGUs to develop a basis for climate mitigation efforts through the greenhouse gas inventory, and through the CCET presentation, and of course, discuss how the national and local government can work together to ensure we have sufficient funding for necessary climate actions,” said Cuenca.   Ms. Elaine Joyce V. Borejon of the CCC’s Policy Research and Development Division discussed the National Climate Risk Management Framework (NCRMF), a policy initiative of the CCC that envisions a climate action planning system that is anchored on a unified and integrated science and risk-based approach through the presence of a strong risk database, information, and analytics system accessible at the national and subnational levels.   “We really look forward to enjoining you in [the NCRMF] process. Higher education institutions are very crucial in this, so we want sustained partnerships [with you] towards our country’s transformation,” said Borejon.   Mr. Francisco S. Dacumos III of the CCC’s Implementation Oversight Division discussed how LGUs could account and monitor their GHG emissions and climate-related expenditures.   A GHG inventory is an estimate of all emissions and removals of GHG from given sources and sinks within a defined spatial and temporal dimensions, while the CCET mandates government agencies to track their climate change expenditures in their respective budget submissions using a common framework jointly issued by the CCC and the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) to monitor the implementation of the NCCAP at the community level.   “GHG inventory aids in identifying source sectors and activities contributing to GHG emissions, as well as understanding trends in emissions and removals alike. It serves several purposes in terms of policymaking, and strategic and investment planning, as it provides scientific bases upon which emissions reduction strategies and policies shall be constructed. The CCET meanwhile provides information on which sectors national and local governments focus their resources on, and what general or specific actions they are undertaking. Through this, financing gaps and deficient sectors which require attention in terms of financing and urgency are identified,” said Dacumos.   The ACT Local Online Conference aims to formalize a sustainable partnership between the national government, academe, and the private sector in providing technical and/or financial resources to LGUs on climate action. Through this, relevant stakeholders will be capacitated to assist and contribute to efforts that will generate information, boost capacity development, promote cooperation and convergence, facilitate vertical and horizontal alignment for development planning, and access to climate financing windows towards climate resiliency.   The last leg of the online webinar, airing on October 27th, will focus on the process of accessing the People’s Survival Fund (PSF) and developing PSF proposals.   Interested participants may register through this link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/accelerated-climate-action-transformation-for-local-communities-act-local-tickets-121024931829?aff=PARTICIPANTS   For more information about the ACT Local Online Conference and ACT Local Program, visit the Facebook page of the Climate Change Commission at www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
October 29, 2020 Thursday
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