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“We don’t just give food, we should teach how to grow our own food” – Sustainable Community Pantries
To ensure that health protocols are observed, community pantries have signages reminding locals to maintain physical distancing, wear masks, and disinfect. Photo from the presentation of Adeline Almelor of the Zero Waste Community Pantry in Brgy. San Miguel, Iriga City Camarines Sur. MANILA, 18 June 2021 — The 49th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” featured five founders of zero-waste and innovative community pantries that exhibit not only generosity and consideration, but also sustainable and green practices to inspire more Filipinos to reduce the use of plastic packaging and to plant their own food at their homes.   The online conversation hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda featured community pantry organizers including Adeline Almelor from Brgy. San Miguel, Iriga City Camarines Sur Zero Waste Community Pantry; Jay-vee Mendoza from Anahaw, San Pedro, Laguna Community Plant-ry; Edren Llanillo, Co-founder of Go Bike Project, Bugallon, Pangasinan; Maricon Alvarez from Mother Earth Foundation (MEF) Malabon Community Pantry; and Evelyn Vergara, Founder of the Community Reading Pantry of Tabotong Elementary School in Saranggani Province.   “Dapat hangaan ang mga community pantries sa innovation, sa bayanihan, sa unique na ugali ng mga Pilipino na tumulong hangga't kaya, at sa honesty ng mga Pilipino na kukuha lang niyang kainin at ng kanyang pamilya,” said Legarda.   The guest organizers shared how their community pantries allow people to donate and get food and basic necessities for free, while others distribute vegetable seeds and plants to help people grow their own food. Other pantries also delivered healthcare and educational services.   “Nakakataba talaga ng puso na maging daluyan ng pagtutulungan.  As we highlight the gift of sharing, we are happy to show and hopefully to inspire others that there are many alternatives to single-use plastics,” said Almelor.   "Ang slogan po ng Anahaw Community Pantry ay 'Take what you can plant, share what others can sow.' Ito ay inspired sa community pantry ng Maginhawa although nilagyan namin ng konting twist – ang sine-share namin dito at plants, seedlings and knowledge sa pagtatanim," said Mendoza.   “Simple lamang ang konsepto ng GO BIKE Project, una mag-train ng mga kabataan para maging emergency responders, maging first aiders na tutugon sa panahon ng sakuna, pangalawa mag-customize, mag-disenyo ng mga bisikletang gagamitin nila upang tumugon doon sa mga aksidente, o para magbigay ng first aid sa sino man nangangailangan ng tulong. It’s a combination of a youth na biker volunteers, first aider, tapos meron na rin silang gagamiting bike in saving lives,” said Llanillo.   "Nang dumating ang community pantry, naisip namin na ang ganda ng konsepto na tumutulong ka. Why not help the community people na nakakausap natin sa araw araw na turuan sila i-embrace yung konsepto ng zero waste?" said Alvarez.   “Ginawa namin ang Reading Community Pantry, na kung saan inilabas namin ang reading materials from our reading corner sa school at inilatag sa pantry, kasama ng mga snacks na binili galing sa sariling bulsa,” said Vergara.   A community pantry is a service that offers goods directly to locals. It operates on trust systems and banners the slogan, “Take what you need, give what you can.” The first community pantry during the pandemic was set up in Maginhawa in Quezon City.   Legarda then encouraged the viewers and other community pantries to adopt sustainable practices – by giving people seeds and plants for people to grow in their homes, instead of just giving canned goods, noodles, and instant foods.   “Hindi lang dapat bigay ng bigay, hindi tayo dapat forever na umaasa sa iba. 'We should give a man a fish, but also teach him how to fish'. In this case, we give the person a seed, so that that person can grow his/her own food. We give human a food, but it's better to teach the person how to grow their own food,” Legarda concluded.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
June 18, 2021 Friday
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CCC: The Youth Will Lead the Way to a Sustainable Future
A circular economy is an alternative economic model which promotes a more resource-efficient and cleaner production systems as no materials will be wasted. Photo from the presentation of Comm. Rachel Anne S. Herrera. MANILA, 18 June 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) encourages the youth to join the ongoing campaign to phase out single-use plastics and accelerate the uptake of circular economy to strengthen the country’s climate action.   In the Sulong Pilipinas 2021: Climate Change and the New Normal with the Youth Sector forum, organized by the Department of Finance, discussion focused on the importance of the role of Filipino youth in helping the country become more resilient to the effects of climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic and in improving socioeconomic policies. Hundreds of youth leaders and members of various youth organizations joined as the DOF and CCC, together with other national government agencies and private sector organizations, presented their related programs and initiatives.   Finance Secretary Carlos G. Dominguez III, who is also the Chair-designate of CCC, said that the climate crisis could wipe away the country’s economic gains in one go, like a tsunami, if we continue to do nothing and fail to mitigate it.   On a long term average basis, the Philippines is expected to incur PHP 177 billion (USD 3.6 billion) per year in losses to public and private assets due to typhoons and earthquakes. In the next 50 years, the country has a 40% chance of experiencing a loss exceeding PHP 989 billion, and a 20% chance of experiencing a loss exceeding PHP 1,525 billion.   “As bearers of the future, the youth--who will have to live through 2030 and beyond--have the greatest stake in overcoming this crisis. It is therefore very important that you understand this issue and take the lead in reversing this destructive course,” said Dominguez. “We need your determination to build a greener, healthier and climate-resilient future. We want you to use your talents, knowledge, and passion to achieve our climate ambition.”   Finance Assistant Secretary Paola Alvarez presented the country’s adaptation and mitigation measures, as well as initiatives in setting up the climate finance roadmap.   Climate finance in the country is a balance between the implementation of sustainable climate change actions and the pursuit of the country’s economic growth and development potential – focusing on financial instruments that are designed to mitigate the economic impacts of climate change while increasing revenue generation, taking into account environmental risks and impacts; and on green facilities and solutions to finance programs and projects on environment and natural resources management.   “All of these things are part of our commitments to show that the Philippines is serious in terms of implementing its climate change initiatives. We hope that the youth will appreciate what we are doing so that you can craft actionable recommendations on what or how you think the government can do policy or take action to help you secure your future,” said Alvarez, who is also the representative of Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III in the Advisory Council of the Principles of Sustainable Finance.   CCC Commissioner Rachel Herrera shared the government’s initiatives on circular economy and anti-single use plastic campaign. She emphasized that pursuing a circular economy is interconnected with phasing out single-use plastics – which has been an environmental, public health, and climate change concern.   A circular economy is an alternative economic model where no materials are wasted; instead of ending up as waste, they move back to the beginning of the supply chain, meaning used materials find new lives. It adopts a more resource-efficient and cleaner production systems where the industry becomes more competitive while protecting the environment better.   “Our country’s single-use plastic problem is already hurting the entire planet. This is not the wake-up call—we’ve already been hearing that for many years now; but it is high time to stop pressing the snooze button, and start solving the problem,” Herrera stressed.   The CCC encourages the youth to adapt to more sustainable lifestyles and inspire more people to shift away from single-use plastics, and towards circularity and sustainability.   “The circular economy is largely focused on the technology and business side, but in the end a shift to it will only happen and succeed if individuals live sustainably—and in that, I hope you can spark positive, lasting change,” Herrera said. “We look forward to your insights on these issues. With young Filipinos like you leading the way, we have faith: susulong tayo sa mas ligtas at sustainable na kinabukasan para sa inyo,” she added.   Sulong Pilipinas is the annual consultative conference between the Duterte administration and various citizen groups. Since 2016, Sulong has been the platform for the government to consult stakeholders on socioeconomic priorities.   For more updates, visit the Facebook Page of Sulong Pilipinas at facebook.com/TulongSulongPH.
June 18, 2021 Friday
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CCC: Sustainable Gastronomy is a call for Climate Action!
MANILA, 16 June 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) joins the world in the celebration of local ingredients and producers, preserving culinary traditions and the environment, raising awareness on global sustainable development measures across the sectors of agriculture, forestry, and fisheries, and to practice sustainability in our daily lives this Sustainable Gastronomy Day.   June 18 of each year marks the celebration of Sustainable Gastronomy Day under UN General Assembly Resolution A/RES/71/246. This celebration aims to focus the world’s attention on the role that sustainable gastronomy can play in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, including by promoting agricultural development, food security, nutrition, sustainable food production and the conservation of biodiversity,   Gastronomy is the study of the relationship between food and culture. It involves training and studying the preparation, production, and service of the various foods and beverages, from countries around the world. Sustainability is the idea of something that is done in a way without causing any infliction to our natural resources and can be continued into the future without harming our environment or health.   Sustainable gastronomy is the cuisine that takes into account where ingredients are from, how food is grown/sourced and how it gets to our markets and our plates, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.   But the Special Report on Climate Change and Land released by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated that food generated between 21% and 37% of man-made emissions, specifically from: (i) crop and livestock activities within the farm; (ii) land use and land-use change dynamics associated with agriculture; and (iii) food processing, retail and consumption patterns, including the manufacture of chemical fertilizers and fuel.   For this celebration, the CCC urges everyone to help build a common vision for sustainable gastronomy — where food is nutritious and accessible to all, where we use clean sources of energy for cooking like through natural gas and electricity instead of coal, where we use biodegradable packaging like cooking and wrapping food in banana leaves, and where our ingredients and natural resources are managed in a way that maintains ecosystem functions to support current human needs, and lowers our carbon footprint. 
June 16, 2021 Wednesday
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Zero-waste at makabagong community pantries, bibida ngayong ika-49 na episode ng seryeng ‘Stories for a Better Normal’
MAYNILA, ika-16 ng Hunyo taong 2021 —Magtitipon-tipon virtually ang ilan sa mga kilalang community pantry organizers upang ibahagi ang kani-kanilang sustainable and green practices sa pag-oorganisa sa mga community-based initiatives ngayong ika-49 na episode ng seryeng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” na may temang, “Zero-waste and Innovative Community Pantries.”   Pinangungunahan ni dating three-term Senator, at ngayo'y Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda ang episode na ito, na mapapanood sa Huwebes, ika-17 ng Hunyo 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live sa facebook.com/CCCPhl at facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Kasama sa gaganaping online na talakayan ang mga community pantry organizers mula sa iba’t ibang dako ng bansa, kabilang na rito sina Adeline Almelor mula sa Brgy. San Miguel Iriga City, Camarines Sur Zero Waste Community Pantry; Maricon Alvarez mula sa Mother Earth Foundation (MEF) Malabon Community Pantry; Jay-vee Mendoza mula sa Anahaw, San Pedro, Laguna Community Plant-ry; Edren Llanillo, Co-founder ng Go Bike Project, mula sa Bugallon, Pangasinan; at Evelyn Vergara, Founder ng Community Reading Pantry ng Tabotong Elementary School sa Saranggani Province.   Nagtatayo ng mga pansamantalang community pantries ang mga Pilipino para matulungan ang mga naghihikaos sa pera dahil sa kawalan ng trabaho ngayong panahon ng pandemya. Sa pamamagitan ng mga nasabing community pantries nagkaroon ng paraan ang mga tao para mag-donate at makakuha ng libreng pagkain at iba pang pangunahing pangangailangan, habang ang iba naman ay namamahagi ng mga binhi ng gulay at iba pang mga halaman upang makatulong sa ibang tao na makapagtanim ng sarili nilang kakainin. Samantala, naghahatid din ang ilang pantries ng mga serbisyong pangkalusugan at pang-edukasyon.   Itatampok sa episode na ito ang mga indibidwal na nag-organisa at nanguna sa community pantries sa kani-kanilang mga barangay. Ipinakita nila hindi lamang ang kagandahang loob at konsiderasyon, kun’di pati na rin ang pagsasagawa ng mga zero-waste operations, umaasa na magbigay inspirasyon sa maraming mga Pilipino na bawasan ang paggamit ng plastic packaging.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan, kamalayang pangkapaligiran, at mga kasanayan sa pag-angkop sa klima, naglalayon ang "Stories for a Better Normal" na baguhin ang kaisipan ng mga tao, mga pamilya, at mga pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga pamamaraan kung saan maaaring magkaroon tayo at isabuhay natin ang isang ‘better normal’ sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.   Na-organisa ang online na talakayang ito mula sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) na binigyang-suporta naman mula sa Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Mother Earth Foundation, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, and The Climate Reality Project-Philippines.
June 16, 2021 Wednesday
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Zero-waste & Innovative Community Pantries in 49th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 15 June 2021 — Community pantry organizers will gather virtually to exhibit sustainable and green practices in organizing and participating in community-based initiatives on the 49th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic, “Zero-waste and Innovative Community Pantries.”   The episode, hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 17 June 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are community pantry organizers from various areas in the country including  Adeline Almelor from Brgy. San Miguel Iriga City , Camarines Sur Zero Waste Community Pantry; Maricon Alvarez from Mother Earth Foundation (MEF) Malabon Community Pantry; Jay-vee Mendoza from Anahaw, San Pedro, Laguna Community Plant-ry; Edren Llanillo, Co-founder of Go Bike Project, Bugallon, Pangasinan; and Evelyn Vergara, Founder of the Community Reading Pantry of Tabotong Elementary School in Saranggani Province.   Filipinos are setting up makeshift community pantries to aid those that suffer economically as a result of the pandemic. The Community Pantries allow people to donate and get food and basic necessities for free, while others distribute vegetable seeds and plants to help people grow their own food. Other pantries also delivered healthcare and educational services.   The upcoming episode will feature individuals who organize and lead community pantries in their respective barangays. They exhibit not only generosity and consideration, but also practice zero-waste operations, hopeful to inspire more Filipinos to reduce the use of plastic packaging.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Mother Earth Foundation, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, and The Climate Reality Project-Philippines.
June 15, 2021 Tuesday
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TAYO Laban Sa Pandemya: Tulong. Alaga. Yakap. Oras.
The Department of Education has ensured that their teaching and non-teaching personnel were given adequate psychosocial support during the pandemic. Photo from the presentation of Ms. Joan Grace Llamado from the DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service. MANILA, 14 June 2021 — The 48th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” featured the Department of Education’s “TAYO Laban Sa Pandemya: Tulong. Alaga. Yakap. Oras,” a mental health wellness campaign aimed to raise awareness and advocate for mental health and wellness to protect and promote the well-being of learners and personnel during the pandemic.   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda featured guests from DepEd including Director Ronilda R. Co and Ms. Joan Grace Llamado from the DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS); Ms. Marie Fe G. Manuzon, Principal II from San Casimiro Elementary School in Nueva Ecija; and Marchelle dela Cruz from Cabiao Senior High School, Nueva Ecija and Francis Paulin from Buanoy National High School, Cebu, who shared and discussed the Department’s Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Services (MHPSS) for Learners of the DepEd DRRMS, particularly the OKKK! Tambayan (Online Kahusayan at Katatagan ng Kabataan), and other programs aimed at protecting and promoting the well-being of learners and personnel in times of pandemic and disasters.   Director Co and Ms. Llamado emphasized the importance of knowing the real state of mental health of our students and educators to be able to provide proper care and assistance to them.   “Learning continuity in the midst of emergency or disasters - pero bago tayo makapag-continuity, kailangang alagaan at alamin natin ang kalagayan ng mga tao at bigyan sila ng alaga, kaginhawaan, at katatagan, para makapagpatuloy sa pag-aaral, o kaya pagtuturo, o pagpapatuloy ng kanilang gawain,” said Dir. Co.   “Napakahalaga po ng ating mga DepEd personnel, hindi po natin maibibigay yung quality education para sa ating mga learners kung ang mga teachers po natin ay hindi rin okay, kaya nagbibigay rin po tayo sa kanila ng psychological first aid,” said Ms. Llamado.   Principal Manuzon expressed that unity and showing care toward one another are keys to overcoming the challenges posed by the pandemic.   “Ang pagkakaisa, pagtutulungan, at pagmamahalan sa loob at labas ng paaralan ay isang malaking tulong upang malabanan ang kahit anong pagsubok ang kinakaharap ngayong panahon na may pandemya dito sa ating bansa,” said Principal Manuzon.   Dela Cruz and Paulin, as OKKK! Tambayers, shared how they motivate their fellow students to continue finding their purpose and ways to cope with the stress brought by distance and online learning.   "Sabihin po nating 'You are important, you are worth it, and you have a purpose' kung hindi po natin nalalaman kung ano ang dahilan kung bakit tayo nandito sa mundo. Alam ko pong darating ang araw na masasabi natin na 'Alam ko na kung bakit ako nandito sa mundong ito, dahil may kailangan akong gawin at kakayanin ko ito. Kung mapapagod man ako ay tiyak na magpapatuloy ako para magawa ang purpose ko dito sa mundo," said dela Cruz.   “Ilagay po sa puso’t isipan natin na let’s not be hindered by the pandemic. Let’s be prosperous and innovative to bring out our own light and greatness,” said Paulin.   Legarda, who co-authored the Mental Health Act while she was at the Senate, emphasized the need to further support and strengthen the Mental Health and Psychosocial Services by implementing it to every DepEd school, so that everyone can have access to wellness at psychosocial support. She also highlighted the importance of mental wellness as we cope in this time of COVID-19 and disasters.   "Hindi perpekto ang buhay. Maraming hamon, hindi lang sa kabataan, pati na sa amin na may edad na at karanasan, hindi lang sa panahon ng pandemic. Ang daming challenges, ang daming problema, hindi mawawala iyon. Let us do what we can. Let us be grateful of whatever we have, big or small, at magtutulungan sa panahon ng pangangailangan,” Legarda concluded.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Mother Earth Foundation, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, and The Climate Reality Project-Philippines.
June 14, 2021 Monday
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CCC on 123rd PH Independence Day: Liberate Filipinos from Climate Threats
MANILA, 12 June 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) joins the Filipino nation in pursuing prosperity and resilience through urgent and widespread climate action and green recovery, in observance of the 123rd anniversary of the declaration of Philippine Independence today.   As a large island archipelago, the Philippines is witness to the intensifying effects of climate change. An average of 20 tropical cyclones, which are now observed to obtain increased intensity and scale, ravage the country every year. Global warming exacerbates droughts and dry spells and increases ocean temperatures causing sea levels to rise and induce coral bleaching.   The CCC commits to work with every Filipino and the international community to bring urgent transformation to our ailing environment and planet. The clearing of our forests and conversion of our mountains and lands have threatened the survival of plant and animal species that nurture life in our ecosystems. The plastic waste polluting our rivers and oceans have killed marine life and given rise to public health and safety risks. The continuous burning of fossil fuels from industries and sectors has polluted our air and aggravated the climate crisis.    The CCC vows to continue liberating our vulnerable populations from growing climate risks, demand climate finance and justice, and escalate efforts towards a more resilient Philippines—a country that is plastic-free and sustainable, and whose peoples are inspired to protect our own nation and planet.   The CCC also calls on all Filipinos to honor our fallen heroes by joining in the observance and upholding our sovereignty, to allow the present and future generations to rise under our greener, healthier vision for the country.
June 12, 2021 Saturday
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Pasig, Tullahan, other PH rivers are the top plastic-emitting rivers in the world – study
Rivers are a major source of plastic waste in the oceans. Philippine rivers are among the top contributors to riverine plastic emissions. Modeling and image from The Ocean Cleanup. Website:https://theoceancleanup.com/sources/.   MANILA, 9 June 2021 — More than a quarter of rivers worldwide responsible for 80% of ocean plastic pollution are found in the Philippines, with Pasig River and 18 other Philippine rivers among the top 50 polluting rivers in the world, according to a scientific study released by the publication Ocean Cleanup in the journal Science Advances.   The researchers designed a tool to track plastics flowing into the oceans, which calculated that 454 'very small' rivers contribute 25 percent of global annual emissions, while 360 ‘small rivers’ make up 24 percent of emissions. One hundred sixty-two (162) ‘medium rivers’ are responsible for 22 percent of emissions, while 18 ‘large’ and six 'very large' rivers contribute to two percent and one percent of plastic emissions respectively. Other rivers of varying sizes contribute to 26 percent of the pollution.   The largest contributing country estimated by the model was the Philippines, with 466 out of 1,656 world’s rivers dumping more than 356,371 metric tons of plastic wastes annually. The world's most polluting river when it comes to plastic is the 27-kilometer Pasig River which runs through Metro Manila, accounting for 63,000 tons of plastic entering oceans from rivers per year.   The study also suggested that coastal countries like the Philippines have a relatively high probability of plastic entering the ocean due to various factors, including short distances from land-based sources to rivers, and much shorter distances to oceans. Plastic also flows more easily into rivers from paved urban areas than it does in rivers from forests, and travels farther in rainy climates than dry ones. The researchers also considered for the study the proximity of landfills and dumpsites to river banks, finding out that those within 10 kilometers of rivers are likely to spill into them.   Aside from Pasig River, among the top 50 rivers that carry the most amount of trash and plastic into the ocean mentioned in the study are the following:   •         Tullahan River •         Meycauayan River •         Pampanga River •         Libmanan River •         Rio Grande de Mindanao River •         Agno River •         Agusan River •         Paranaque River •         Iloilo River •         Imus River •         Zapote River •         Cagayan de Oro River •         Davao River •         Malaking Tubig River •         Tambo, Pasay (Storm drain) •         Jalaur River •         Cagayan River •         Hamulauon River   The study suggested to have a targeted approach to drastically reduce the world’s river plastic emissions.   For the Climate Change Commission, the study findings raise extreme concern on the issue of mismanaged plastic wastes in the country, and supports the call of the Commission for urgent efforts to solve the plastic crisis by implementing measures to regulate and in turn, halt the production of unnecessary plastics-made straws and stirrers, spoon and fork, and plastic labo, among others.   House Bill No. 9147 or the “Single-Use Plastics Products Regulation Act”, recently approved on second reading in the lower House, serves as a potential measure that will effectively address the country’s high rate of plastic waste leakage and plastics' impacts on the environment, public health, and climate change through a nationwide phaseout of single-use plastics and implementation of producers’ responsibility schemes. This ushers the start for producers to shift their dependence on throwaway packaging models to more sustainable reuse and refill systems.   The agency strongly urges the public to use alternatives and adopt workable community-based solutions to shift away from the single-use, throwaway culture that currently dominates our market.
June 09, 2021 Wednesday
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Mental health at wellness sa new normal sa ika-48 na episode ng seryeng ‘Stories for a Better Normal’
MAYNILA, ika-9 ng Hunyo taong 2021 — Magtitipon-tipon ang mga eksperto mula sa Department of Education (DepEd) para magbigay kaalaman sa usapin ng mental health at wellness, para maprotektahan at maitaguyod ang kapakanan ng mga mag-aaral kasama ng mga manggagawa sa hanay ng sektor ng edukasyon ngayong panahon ng pandemya sa ika-48 na episode ng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” na may temang, “TAYO Laban Sa Pandemya: Tulong. Alaga. Yakap. Oras.” Ang episode na ito ay hango sa isa sa mga programang pang mental health at wellness ng DepEd.   Ang online discussion na mula sa konsepto ni dating three-term Senator at ngayo’y Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, na ipapalabas sa Huwebes, ika-10 ng Hunyo 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live sa facebook.com/CCCPhl at facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda at sa opisyal na Facebook page ng DepEd na facebook.com/DepartmentOfEducation.PH   Kabilang sina Ms. Ronilda R. Co, Director ng DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS); Ms. Joan Grace Llamado, Project Manager ng  DepEd Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Services; Ms. Maria Fe G. Manuzon, Principal ng DepEd Nueva Ecija; at sina Ms. Marchelle dela Cruz mula sa Cabiao Senior High School at Mr. Francis Paulin mula sa Buanoy National High School na magbabahagi ng karanasan sa Mental Health at Psychosocial Support Services (MHPSS) at iba pang mga programa ng ahensya na naglalayong maprotektahan ang kapakanan ng mga mag-aaral kasama ng mga manggagawa sa sektor ng edukasyon ngayong panahon ng pandemya at mga sakuna.   Matagal nang nakapagbibigay ng mental health at psychosocial support ang DepEd-DRRMS tuwing may sakuna o mga emergencies mula pa ng taong 2016. Inaamin at kinikilala nito ang mga hamong dala ng pandemyang COVID-19 sa buong pamayanang DepEd: para sa mga mag-aaral, na ngayo’y kinakailangang masanay sa distance learning, kung saan hindi nila kasama ang kanilang mga guro at mga kaibigan; para sa mga guro, pinag-iisipan pa kung papaanong sila’y epektibong makapagturo ng leksyon sa karampatang asignatura; para sa mga kawani, na nagtatrabaho sa ngalan ng pagpapatuloy ng serbisyong publiko kahit na sa gitna ng quarantine; at para sa mga pamilyang patuloy na sumusuporta sa edukasyon ng kanilang mga anak sa harap ng takot at pangamba.   Bibigyang-diin sa susunod na episode ang mga karanasan ng mga mag-aaral at ng mga kawani na nakinabang sa mga programa ng DepEd MHPSS sa pag-asang maitataguyod nito at mapoprotektahan ang mental health at wellness ng ating mga mag-aaral at kawaning nagtatrabaho sa sektor ng edukasyon.   Na-organisa ang online na talakayang ito mula sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) na binigyang-suporta naman ng Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines at ng Mother Earth Foundation.
June 09, 2021 Wednesday
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“Panahon na para i-phase-out natin ang single-use plastics”
Photo from the presentation of Mr. Froilan Grate, President of Mother Earth Foundation.  MAYNILA, ika-8 ng Hunyo taong 2021 — Sa ika-47 na episode ng  “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” na may temang “Uniting Against Single-Use Plastic”, itinampok ang mga kinatawan mula sa malalaking civil society organizations na nagsusulong ng pag-phase-out ng single-use plastic (SUP) at agarang pag-pasa ng panukalang-batas na Single-use Plastic Products Regulation.   Pinangunahan ni dating three-term Senator, na ngayo'y Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda ang nasabing online discussion na dinaluhan nina Froilan Grate, Regional Coordinator ng Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) at President ng Mother Earth Foundation; Atty. Gloria Ramos, Vice President ng Oceana Philippines; at Marian Ledesma, zero-waste campaigner ng Greenpeace Philippines.   “Umaabot sa 3 milyong metric tons ng basura at 500,000 metric tons ang plastic waste leakage kada taon. Ayon sa GAIA, tayong mga Pilipino ay gumagamit ng 59.7 bilyong piraso ng sachet kada taon. Sa 100 million Filipinos, kung lahat ay gumagamit ng sachet, lumalabas na kada tao ay nagtatapon ng 597 pieces ng sachet per year. Hindi biro ang bilang na ito. Karamihan sa plastic na basura na tinatapon ay hindi nareresikulo. Napupunta ito sa basurahan o di kaya sa dagat at di natutunaw ng daan-daang taon," ayon kay Legarda.   Iginiit ni Legarda na pag-isipan ang ating pagkonsumo ng single-use plastic.   Inilahad ng mga panauhin mula sa civil society ang kanilang mga programa at proyekto sa kabuuan ng pamayanan para matugunan ang mga problemang dulot ng plastic pollution. Ibinahagi rin nila ang mga plastic-free alternatives para sa lokal na mga negosyo at alternative delivery systems at reuse solutions.   “Sa loob ng isang zero-waste system, kailangang sistema talaga ang nakikita natin, where the recyclables are being collected para ibalik at magagamit ito ulit. Ang ating mga food scrap at basura mula sa kusina na nabubulok ay magagamit muli via composting methods. Yung residual, yung trash natin, dito pumapasok yung efforts ng ating mga mambabatas para i-address through EPR (Extended Producer’s Responsibility) or SUP (Single-Use Plastic) ban na moving na sa ngayon. With companies, we are pushing them to redesign their products at magbenta ng kanilang produkto na hindi gumagamit ng plastic. It’s a whole system, lahat tayo ay may papel na gagampanan, pero kailangan din na makita yung buong sistema,” sabi ni Froilan Grate.   “Alam nating lahat na ang solusyon ay nasa ating mga kamay, ngunit kailangan pa nating magsikap at pagbutihin pa, magkaisa, makipag-tulungan, at mahalagang mayroon tayong mga konsyumer na mulat at may alam, at talagang may pakialam sa decision-making.  Ang talagang layunin natin ay tuluyang mapigilan ang plastic pollution at the source. Kinakailangan na ring magpalabas na at maglathala ng listahan ng mga non-environmentally acceptable products and packaging ang National Solid Waste Management Commission. Malayo ang mararating nito sa pagpigil natin sa plastic pollution at the very source,” sabi ni Atty. Gloria Ramos.   “Umaasa talaga tayong mas maraming mga negosyo ang kusang magbago ng kani-kanyang mga sistema at maging mas maagap na makasabay sa bagong mga proseso na inilunsad, alinsunod sa kaisipang pagbabawas ng plastic use. Ang mga pagbabagong kanilang magagawa ay maaari talagang makapag-pabago sa pamamaraan kung paano magnegosyo ang mundo, at maaari rin nitong baguhin ang ating sistema for the better,” sabi ni Marian Ledesma.   Ang episode ay ipinalabas kasabay ng approval ng House Bill No. 9147 o ang Single-Use Plastic Products Regulation Bill sa pangalawang pagbasa. Ang panukalang-batas, na naglalayong i-phase out ang iba’t-ibang uri ng plastics sa susunod na mga taon, ay sponsored ng House Committee on Ecology kung saan pinamunuan at kapwang may-akda si Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda.   Si Commissioner Rachel Herrera ng Climate Change Commission ay nagpaabot rin ng mga gawaing pagkilos ng pambansang pamahalaan sa nabanggit na kampanya laban sa plastics. Ang lahat ng pagkilos-gawain na ito ay pinangungunahan ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) at Department of Finance (DOF), sa pakikipagtulungan ng iba pang mga ahensya ng pambansang pamahalaan.   “Buo ang suporta ng Executive Department agencies para sa pagsasabatas nito, sa pamamagitan ng Cabinet Cluster on Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation and Disaster Risk Reduction (CCAM-DRR) Resolution No. 1 na sinimulang ipatupad ngayong taon, na nagpa-pahayag ng pagsuporta para sa national regulation at phase-out ng single-use plastics. Marami ring naka-pending na kaparehong bills sa Senado. Si Senator Manny Pacquiao ay nagsulong ng sarili niyang panukalang batas na Single-Use Plastics Regulation Bill (SBN 2262) noong nakaraan ika-1 ng Hunyo,” sabi ni Commissioner Herrera.   Nagsulong din si Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda ng House Resolution No. 1829, na humihikayat sa kongreso na magdaos ng inquiry sa National Solid Waste Management Commission at iba pang mga ahensya ng pambansang pamahalaan ukol sa pagpapatupad ng Ecological Solid Waste Management Act ng 2000 (Republic Act 9003), lalung-lalo na sa provision ukol sa non-environmentally acceptable na mga produkto o packaging.   “Mula nung naisabatas ang RA 9003 noong January 2001, dapat nakalista na yung mga pinagbabawal o phase-out na plastic, dapat na-implement, pero hanggang ngayon, 20 years na ang nakalilipasn ay wala pa ring listahan. Let us look into the non-implementation of the list ng mga ipinagbabawal sa ilalim ng Ecological Solid Waste Management Law,” Iginiit ni Deputy Speaker Legarda.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan at kamalayang pang-kapaligiran, naglalayon ang "Stories for a Better Normal" na baguhin ang kaisipan ng mga tao, mga pamilya, at mga pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga pamamaraan kung saan maaaring magkaroon tayo at maisasabuhay natin ang isang ‘better normal’ sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.   Na-organisa ang online na talakayang ito mula sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) na binigyang-suporta naman ng Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Mother Earth Foundation, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, at The Climate Reality Project-Philippines.
June 08, 2021 Tuesday
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Mental health and wellness in the new normal in 48th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 8 June 2021 — Guests from the Department of Education (DepEd) will gather to raise awareness and advocate for mental health and wellness, to protect and promote the well-being of learners and personnel in times of pandemic on the 48th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic, “TAYO Laban Sa Pandemya: Tulong. Alaga. Yakap. Oras.” The episode title is adapted from one of DepEd’s mental health wellness programs.   The online conversation, conceptualized and hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 10 June 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda. The episode will also be streamed through the official Facebook Page of DepEd at facebook.com/DepartmentOfEducation.PH.   Joining the online conversation are Director Ronilda R. Co and Ms. Joan Grace Llamado from the DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS); Ms. Maria Fe G. Manuzon from the Division of Nueva Ecija; Marchelle dela Cruz from Cabiao Senior High School; and Francis Paulin from Buanoy National High School to share and discuss the department’s Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Services (MHPSS) and other programs aimed at protecting and promoting the well-being of learners and personnel in times of pandemic and disasters.   The DepEd-DRRMS has been providing mental health and psychosocial support to learners and personnel affected by disasters or emergencies since 2016. It acknowledges the challenges brought by the COVID-19 pandemic to the whole DepEd community: for learners, who now adapt to distance learning, isolated from their teachers and friends; for teachers, who are reimagining how education should be done; for personnel, who are working for learning and public service continuity despite the pandemic and quarantine; and for the families, who continue to support learning in the face of anxiety and uncertainty.   DepEd also recognizes that COVID-19 has the potential to create a long-lasting and deep-seated “second pandemic” of mental health crises, bringing forth a generation afflicted with mental and psychosocial difficulties.   The upcoming episode will highlight the experiences of learners and personnel who benefitted from the DepEd MHPSS programs in the hopes of promoting and protecting mental health and wellness in the new normal.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
June 08, 2021 Tuesday
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IOM Report: Climate change drives more Filipinos to migrate
MANILA, 7 June 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) commits to integrate migration as a key theme in policy discourse, and to develop migrant-centered policies and programs as more and more Filipinos are forced to migrate due to the climate crisis.   A report from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) Philippines, Framing the Human Narrative of Migration in the Context of Climate Change: A Preliminary Review of Existing Evidence in the Philippines, identified farmers and fisherfolks, women, older persons, and the urban poor as the most vulnerable to climate impacts due to slow and rapid onset events, physical constraints to move, and low capacities to adapt.   The report particularly sheds light on the state of environmental migration in the Philippines, engaging the cities of Manila, Malabon, Iloilo, and Davao, as well as Samar Province, in the community consultations conducted for this report. The areas were selected due to their high exposure and vulnerability to climate impacts.   Jerome Ilagan, Chief of the CCC Policy Research and Development Division, said that “This is a long fight against the climate crisis. All institutions must unite and have the collective resolve to really ensure that across generations, we create champions from the communities. Our government is all prepared in terms of policy and programming support mechanisms and this IOM study is a policy-support decision tool. We know that the road towards resilience may be long and bumpy, but if we are together knowing that our mission is to make sure that no one is left behind, we will survive and thrive in this era of climate change.”   The report defined an environmental migrant as “persons or groups of persons who, predominantly for reasons of sudden or progressive change in the environment that adversely affects their lives or living conditions, are obliged to leave their habitual homes, or choose to do so, either temporarily or permanently, and who move either within their country or abroad.” It also provided an initial framework for in-depth policy research on climate migration, building on the existing evidence on migration and climate change in the Philippines strengthened by interviews with local governments and vulnerable sectors and communities who have been impacted.   The climate emergency worsens the already vulnerable geographic status of the Philippines and brings about more, extreme weather events, rising temperatures, sea level rise, heavy rainfall, and drought.   The physical effects of sea-level rise include inundation of low-lying areas, erosion, saltwater intrusion, increased risk of flooding, and storm surge damage. Such exposure and high vulnerability affect migration patterns in the country.   Municipalities and cities located along coastal areas are projected to be directly impacted and submerged by sea-level rise and inundation in only three decades. And according to the report, there are already 5.4 million Filipinos occupying land whose elevation is below the annual flood level.   This scenario leads to not only substantial socioeconomic losses of coastal structures, but also displacement of the population and forced shifts in livelihood sources and strategies. As people forge new ways of living, they also face increased vulnerabilities.   During the launch of the report on June 4, the CCC expressed its commitment to enhance efforts to respond to the immediate needs of affected populations while ensuring migration is utilized as a tool towards sustainable adaptation and risk mitigation for those affected by climate change.   The report, developed in partnership between IOM and CCC, can be accessed through this link: https://philippines.iom.int/sites/philippines/files/documents/Framing%20the%20Human%20Narrative%20of%20Migration%20in%20the%20Context%20of%20Climate%20Change_0.pdf.
June 07, 2021 Monday
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CCC on Envi Day, Month: Practice Sustainability to Protect Ailing Environment
MANILA, 4 June 2021 — In celebration of World Environment Day (June 5) and Philippine Environment Month (June), the Climate Change Commission (CCC) urged households and citizens to adopt a more sustainable lifestyle, including reducing and avoiding single-use plastic consumption, in order to help heal and protect our ailing environment and planet.   June was declared as the Philippine Environment Month, by virtue of Proclamation No. 237, s. 1988, to raise environmental consciousness among Filipinos. With the theme, “Sama-samang Pagkilos, Sama-samang Paghilom (Ikaw, Ako, Tayo ang Kalikasan),” this year’s celebration aims to draw attention and create a united movement for the Earth’s restoration, by reimagining a better world, reviving the strength of rivers, oceans, and coasts, and rethinking plastic use.   The CCC stressed that the country’s massive plastic consumption—with sachets alone, at 164 million pieces daily—and high plastic leakage to open environment has led to the Philippines being cited as a top plastic polluter in our oceans and lands. The climate body also noted that plastics are petroleum products and therefore contribute to global warming and climate change due to the extraction and burning of fossil fuels throughout their life cycle.   In order to encourage citizens to practice sustainability and lead a more environment-friendly lifestyle, the CCC recommended the following initiatives that individuals, households, and communities could pursue:   Growing your own food or patronizing local, plant-based, and in-season produce; Considering energy and cost-efficient transport modes, like walking and biking; Practicing energy conservation measures, such as using low-wattage appliances, unplugging electronics, and converting to LED light bulbs; Contributing to efficient waste management system by segregating waste, recycling products, and composting food scraps; Refusing and avoiding single-use plastics, such as plastic straws and plastic labo and sando bags by using eco-bags and containers; and Conserving water by collecting rainwater or reusing laundry water for other chores.   The CCC said that the observance should serve as a reminder of our relationship with nature and our responsibility to take better care of our ecosystems, habitats, and biodiversity and ensure a safe, thriving, and healthy future for all and the generations to come.
June 04, 2021 Friday
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“It is now time to phase-out single-use plastics”
Setting up refilling stations could be one of the solutions to address throw-away culture and plastic pollution.  Photo from the presentation of Ms. Marian Ledesma, Zero Waste Campaigner of Greenpeace Philippines. MANILA, 4 June 2021 — The 47th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” series with the topic, “Uniting Against Single-Use Plastic” featured representatives from big civil society organizations advocating for the phase-out of single-use plastics (SUPs) and calling for the immediate passage of the proposed Single-use Plastic Products Regulation Bill to dramatically reduce the dangerous effects of unnecessary plastics on people’s health, the environment, and climate.   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda featured guests Froilan Grate, Regional Coordinator of Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and President of Mother Earth Foundation; Atty. Gloria Ramos, Vice President of Oceana Philippines; and Marian Ledesma, Zero Waste Campaigner of Greenpeace Philippines.   “Umaabot sa tatlong milyong metric tons ng basura, at 500,000 metric tons ang plastic waste leakage kada taon. At ayon sa GAIA, tayong mga Pilipino ay gumagamit ng 59.7 billion na piraso ng sachet kada taon. Sa 100 million Filipinos, kung lahat ay gumagamit ng sachet, lumalabas na kada tao ay nagtatapon ng 597 pieces ng sachet per year. Hindi biro ang bilang na ito. Karamihan sa plastic na basura na tinatapon ay hindi nareresikulo. Nananatili ito sa karagatan for hundreds of years. Let’s spend time to reflect on our consumption of single-use plastic,” Legarda emphasized.   The civil society organizations presented their programs and projects across communities to address the problems caused by plastic pollution, and shared plastic-free alternatives in local enterprises and alternative delivery systems and reuse solutions.   “In a zero-waste system, kailangang sistema talaga ang nakikita natin, where the recyclables are being collected para ibalik at magagamit ito ulit. Ang ating mga food scrap at basura mula sa kusina na nabubulok ay magagamit muli via composting methods. Yung residual, yung trash natin, dito pumapasok yung efforts ng ating mga legislators para i-address via EPR (Extended Producer’s Responsibility) or SUP (Single-Use Plastic) ban na moving na sa ngayon. With companies, we are pushing them to redesign their products at magbenta ng kanilang produkto na hindi gumagamit ng plastic. It’s a whole system, lahat tayo ay may papel na gagampanan, pero kailangan din na makita yung buong sistema,” said Grate.   “We know that the solution is in our hands but we need to work harder, work together, collaborate, and it’s important to have consumers who are informed, and fully engaged in decision-making, ito yung kailangang magawa natin. Our call is to really stop plastic pollution at the source. The National Solid Waste Management Commission should already issue the list of non-environmentally acceptable products and packaging. This will go a long way in stopping plastic pollution at the very source,” said Atty. Ramos.   “We really hope that more businesses can innovate their system and be early adaptors to new processes that are built around the idea of plastic-use reduction. Their innovation can really change the way the world does business and it can also change our system for the better,” said Ledesma.   The episode is held in time with the approval of House Bill No. 9147 or the Single-Use Plastics Products Regulation Act on the second reading. The bill, sponsored by the House Committee on Ecology Chair and co-authored by Legarda, seeks to phase out various types of plastics in the coming years.   Commissioner Rachel Herrera of the Climate Change Commission also joined the conversation and conveyed the national government’s efforts in the campaign to regulate single-use plastics, particularly the Anti Single-Use Plastic campaign spearheaded by the CCC and the Department of Finance, in collaboration with national government agencies.   “Buo ang suporta ng Executive Department agencies para sa pagsasabatas nito, through the Cabinet Cluster on Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation and Disaster Risk Reduction (CCAM-DRR) Resolution No. 1 adopted this year, which expresses its support for this national regulation and phase-out of single-use plastics. Sa Senado ay marami rin pong kaparehong Senate bills. Senator Manny Pacquiao has filed the Single-Use Plastics Regulation Bill (SBN 2262) last June 1,” said  Commissioner Herrera.   Legarda has also filed House Resolution No. 1829, urging Congress to conduct an inquiry of the National Solid Waste Management Commission and other national government agencies on the implementation of the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000 (Republic Act 9003), specifically on the provision on non-environmentally acceptable products or packaging.   “Mula nung naisabatas ang RA 9003 noong January 2001 ay dapat nakalista na yung mga pinagbabawal o phase-out na plastic, dapat na-implement, pero hanggang ngayon, 20 years na ang nakalilipas, ay wala pa ring listahan. Let us look into the non-implementation of the list ng ipinagbabawal sa ilalim ng Ecological Solid Waste Management Law,” Legarda stressed.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Mother Earth Foundation, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, and The Climate Reality Project-Philippines.
June 04, 2021 Friday
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CCC Lauds 2nd Reading House Approval of Single-Use Plastics Regulation Bill
MANILA, 3 June 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) welcomed the approval today on second reading of House Bill No. 9147 or the “Single-Use Plastics Products Regulation Act”, legislation that would effectively address the country’s high rate of plastic waste leakage  and plastics' impacts on the environment, public health, and climate change through a nationwide phaseout of single-use plastics and implementation of producers responsibility schemes.   "We believe that this measure can finally put an end to our addiction to single-use plastics and will accelerate the ongoing research and development of more sustainable products and technologies, while creating green jobs," said Climate Change Commissioner Rachel Herrera.   House Bill 9147, sponsored by Rep. Jose Francisco "Kiko" Benitez, Chair of the House Committee on Ecology - Technical Working Group, seeks to phase-out drinking plastic straws; plastic stirrers; sticks for candy, balloons, and cotton bud; buntings; confetti; and packaging or bags with thickness of less than 10 microns, within one year. As a second category, plastic plates and saucers; cups, bowls, and lids; cutlery; food and beverage containers; oxo-degradable plastics; film wrap of 50 microns thickness or less; and sachets and pouches, are to be phased out within four years.   Producers and importers of single-use plastics shall also phase in extended producer responsibility programs within two years, which include recovery, transportation, and clean-up schemes for plastic wastes, as well as establishment of recycling, composting, and other waste diversion or disposal facilities. The bill also sets out fines and penalties ranging from P50,000 to P1,000,000 and revocation of permit.   The CCC is committed to take a proactive role in promoting concrete actions to help achieve climate targets and reduce our carbon footprint such as by adoption of circular economy approaches and sustainable consumption and production practices. These measures to increase resilience and adaptive capacity have also been identified in the country’s first Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) under the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.   Last January 2021, the CCC together with member agencies of the Cabinet Cluster for Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation and Disaster Risk Reduction (CCAM-DRR) moved to approve Resolution No. 1 “Adopting the Principles of Sustainable Consumption and Production, Towards Regulation and Phaseout of Single-Use Plastics and a Responsible Transition to the Use of Environment-Friendly Products.”
June 03, 2021 Thursday
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Envi, climate experts: Accurate, translatable scientific info strengthens coastal conservation efforts
MANILA, 2 June 2021 — The third and final session of the “Climate Change is Changing our Coastal and Marine Ecosystems” webinar series shed light on the critical role of accurate scientific data sets translatable to understandable information in addressing the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems.   The webinar was organized by the Climate Change Commission, in partnership with RARE Philippines, in celebration of May as the Month of the Ocean and gathered hundreds of participants consisting of members of the academe and research institutions in the Philippines and abroad, government agencies and local government units, policymakers, and organizations leading community-based initiatives, to build awareness on the current and the future state of marine and coastal ecosystems in the Philippines.   The virtual webinar featured presentations from Dr. Mahay Lagmay, Executive Director of the University of the Philippines Resilience Institute (UPRI);  Mr. Rollan Geronimo, Fishing Specialist for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Fish Right Project; and Dr. Mudjekeewis D. Santos, Scientist IV from the National Fisheries Research Development Institute (NFRDI), on data analytics as framework to link climate change data and manage information for decisions, climate change and marine ecosystem modeling, and vulnerability assessment for fisheries and identified/recommended adaptive strategies.   "We hope that the shared stories, data and information from our experts and our stakeholders in this webinar series could facilitate climate and fisheries policies that are grounded and science-based. We hope that this information can be mainstreamed in the programs of our national government agencies, academe, and non-government organizations in ensuring that they are going to reach and be accessible and understandable for local government units, our fisherfolk, and all those who are most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change," said RARE Philippines Vice President Rocky Sanchez-Tirona in her opening remarks.   “In 2012, the Philippines launched the program NOAH or Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards, that put into place all of these weather data into a system - making use of the digital infrastructure to put the satellite data, the doppler data, the sensors, rain gauges, so that we can see all of these information in near realtime. By contouring all of those rainfall sensors, we can see where it's raining heavily at any point in time, we can match them with floods, and also the reports of the crowd who are experiencing floods, and try to validate and improve the science behind how we depict our flood, landslide and storm surge happens,” said Dr. Lagmay.   "We need to strongly support global calls for mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. We've seen how the difference between 8.5 and the 4.5 scenarios is twice actually in terms of impact on our oceans and the seas around us. We need to maximize the use of all available tools to give us a range of plausible scenarios. We can't focus on just one tool and we need to use different tools,” said Mr. Geronimo.   “Whenever we look at our work or development plans at different levels, we should look at it under a climate lens - we should look at the vulnerabilities and the hazards. Otherwise, it might seem far away, instead of hitting our deliverables, it's too far because we don't have a climate lens,” said Dr. Santos.   The Department of Environment and Natural Resources-Biodiversity Management Bureau (DENR-BMB) reiterated the goal of mainstreaming coastal fisheries in the climate change programs and policies of the government at the international, national and local level, assess the impacts of climate change on the sector and build the resilience of the sector against the effects of climate change.   “As science continues to shape national policymaking and implementation programs, it is our duty to ensure dissemination of accurate scientific information translatable to communities' understanding towards their actions, thus, strengthening and widening the reach of our efforts to conserve and protect our coastal and marine resources,” said DENR-BMB Undersecretary for Special Concerns and OIC-Director Edilberto DC. Leonardo.   Moderated by Ms. Candeze Mongaya of RARE Philippines, the webinar series aims to provide the public a broader understanding of the importance of science and data for informed policies on oceans. This is aligned with the overall goal of the United Nations Decade of the Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030) with the message, “The Science We Need for the Ocean We Want”. The full webinar can be accessed through this link: https://www.facebook.com/CCCPhl/videos/210789070722606.
June 02, 2021 Wednesday
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Magkaisa Laban sa Single-Use Plastic sa ika-47 na episode ng ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MAYNILA, ika-2 ng Hunyo taong 2021 — Ang mga malalaking civil society organizations na nagsusulong ng  pag-phaseout ng single-use plastics (SUPs) ay magtitipon virtually upang pag-usapan at talakayin ang mga mapanganib na epekto ng SUPs sa kalusugan ng tao, kapaligiran at klima. Tatalakayin din ng mga nasabing panauhin ang panukalang Single-use Plastic Products Regulation Bill sa ika-47 episode ng seryeng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” na may temang, “Uniting Against Single-Use Plastic.”   Ang episode na ito ay ipalalabas sa Huwebes, ika-3 ng Hunyo 2021, 10:00 AM sa Facebook Live ng facebook.com/CCCPhl at facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Kabilang sa mga panauhin ay sina Froilan Grate, Regional Coordinator ng Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives at President ng Mother Earth Foundation; Atty. Gloria Ramos, Vice President ng Oceana Philippines; at Marian Ledesma, masigasig na zero-waste campaigner ng Greenpeace Philippines. Lahat sila ay dadalo sa online na talakayan na pinangungunahan ni House Deputy Speaker at Antique Representative na si Loren Legarda.   Tatalakayin din sa episode na ito ang plastic-free alternatives sa lokal na mga negosyo pati na rin ang alternative delivery systems at reuse solutions.   Ang Pilipinas ay sadyang kilala sa ating mayamang marine ecosystems, ngunit isa rin ito sa mga pangunahing pinagmumulan ng plastic wastes sa buong mundo.   Ang produksyon, kasama ng pagsusunog ng plastik, ay gumagamit ng petrochemicals na siyang nakadadagdag sa global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at climate change. Ayon sa GAIA, ang mga Pilipino ay gumagamit ng 59.7 bilyong pirasong sachet, 17.5 bilyong pirasong shopping bags, 16.5 bilyong pirasong plastic labo bags, at 1.1 bilyong diapers kada taon.   Ang pandemyang ay lalo pang nagpalala at nagpalaki ng problema natin sa single-use plastics. Dahil sa paglalayon ng mga taong mabawasan ang kontaminasyon at lalo pang paglaganap ng virus, dumalas ang ating paggamit ng highly disposable items, gaya ng mga ginagamit nating pang take-out sa pagkain at packaging ng online deliveries.   Ang episode ay tututok sa pagkilos para matugunan ang mga problemang dulot ng plastic pollution at sa panawagan ng mga organisasyon para sa agarang pagpasa ng Single-Use Plastic Products Regulation bill.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan at kamalayang pang-kapaligiran, naglalayon ang "Stories for a Better Normal" na baguhin ang kaisipan ng mga tao, mga pamilya, at mga pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga pamamaraan kung saan maaaring magkaroon tayo at maisabuhay natin ang isang ‘better normal’ sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.   Na-organisa ang online na talakayang ito mula sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission na binigyang-suporta naman ng Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Philippine Commission on Women, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines at ng Mother Earth Foundation.
June 02, 2021 Wednesday
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“Dapat magsimula sa kabataan ang environment at climate action”— Young Pinoy environment, climate advocates
MAYNILA, ika-1 ng Hunyo taong 2021 — Binigyang-diin ng ilan sa mga kilalang young Filipino environmental at climate advocates ang papel ng kabataan sa paggamit ng kani-kanilang kakayahan sa pagiging malikhain at teknolohiya upang maging changemakers tungo sa isang better normal sa ginanap na ika-46 na episode ng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” na may temang, “Pinoy Changemakers,”   Tampok sa talakayan sina Antoinette Taus, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Goodwill Ambassador at Founder ng CORA at ng The Sustainable Planet; Carmela Ellaga, isang fisheries technologist; Gab Mejia, conservation photographer at environmental storyteller; at Ranielle Navarro, guro mula sa Albay Central School na kinilala bilang 2021 National Geographic awardee. Nagbahagi ang mga panauhin ng kani-kanilang mga environmental advocacies, at nagsulong ng makabuluhang pakikipag-ugnayan ng mga kabataan sa larangan ng  pangangalaga at pagprotekta sa kapaligiran pati na ang pagpapanumbalik ng siglang-buhay ng mundo ngayong new normal.   Ibinahagi ni Taus kung paanong ang pagmamahal, tapang, at layunin ng isang indibidwal, ang siyang magtutulak para aksyunan ang lumalalang environmental degradation at climate change.   "Kung mayroong pagmamahal, katapangan at magandang layunin... Maaari mong ayusin ang lahat ng mga problema sa daigdig para sa parehong tao at mundo – pagmamahal para sa kapuwa tao at pagmamahal para sa kalikasan. At siyempre, ang lakas ng loob na kumilos para sa mga bagay na pinaniniwalaan. At layunin, paniniwalang maski ang maliliit na pagkilos ay sadyang napakahalaga kung ito'y makalilikha maski na kakaunting pagbabago lamang. Walang maliliit na pagbabago lamang at wala ring maliliit na gawang kabutihan. Ang lahat ng ito ay napakahalaga sa isang tao o di kaya'y para sa ating mundo," aniya ni Antoinette Taus.   Kinilala si Ellaga ni dating U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama dahil sa kaniyang pagsisikap na maprotektahan ang planeta, iginiit ni Ellaga ang kahalagahan ng pakikipag-ugnayan sa pagitan ng mga tao para makamit ang sustenableng kinabukasan.   “Ang konserbasyon ay ‘di nangangahulugang pagprotekta lamang sa mga hayop at kalikasan kun’di nangangahulugan din itong pagprotekta sa mga tao, at pagkilos kasama ang isa’t isa. Kinakailangan talagang magtulungan ang mga mamamayan, kaisa ang komunidad sa sama-samang pagkilos para sa pamamahala ng mga yamang baybayin at sa pagprotekta ng mga likas na yaman,” diin ni Carmela Ellaga.   "Bahagi ng pagiging isang conservation photographer ang kaalaman na ang konserbasyon ay hindi lamang tungkol sa pagprotekta ng mga kalupaan at ng mga hayop na mayroon tayo, kun’di tungkol din sa pagbibigay-lakas at pagproprotekta sa sangkatauhan na naninirahan dito - tulad ng lokal na komunidad, at mga mahihirap at napapabayaang mga pamayanan, pati na ang mga mulisipalidad na nakapalibot sa mga protektadong lugar. Dahil sa totoo lang, lahat tayo'y nakakukuha ng mga benepisyo mula sa kapaligiran, protektadong mga lugar, at biodiversity,” pahayag ni Mejia habang binibigyang-tuon ang papel ng photography sa sa pagbuo ng kamalayan at pagpapakilos sa kapaligiran at climate action.   Si Ranielle Navarro ay siyang utak sa likod ng “A Call to Solution: Goals for Environmental Oversight (ACS Geo),” isang proyekto na naglalayong linangin ang kaalaman ukol sa siyensiya, pamamahayag, at pamamahala sa kapaligiran sa pamamagitan ng digital storytelling, geocaching, at paggamit ng mga digital application tulad ng Marine Debris Tracker. Binigyan diin niya ang kahalagahan ng paglikha ng mga bagong oportunidad upang matuto sa kabila ng mga limitasyong dulot ng pandemya para higit na maimpluwensyahan ang iba na kumilos.   “Hindi lamang natatapos sa pagkukuwento ang aming solusyon. Iniimbitahan namin ang aming mga estudyante na maging citizen scientists at journalists sa pamamagitan ng Marine Debris Tracker App. Naniniwala kami na sa aming ACS GEO project ay maaari itong unti-unting mag-ambag sa pagligtas ng ating marine ecosystem. Kaya patuloy kaming lilikha ng mga oportunidad sa pagkatuto gaya ng proyektong ito para sa aming mga mag-aaral sa kabila ng remote learning setting sa gitna ng pandemiya,” sabi ni Navarro.   Bilang isang online discussion upang maisulong ang kalusugan, kamalayang pangkapaligiran, at mga kasanayan sa pag-angkop sa klima, naglalayon ang "Stories for a Better Normal" na baguhin ang kaisipan ng mga tao, mga pamilya, at mga pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga pamamaraan kung saan maaaring magkaroon tayo at isabuhay natin ang isang ‘better normal’ sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.   Na-organisa ang online na talakayang ito mula sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) na binigyang-suporta naman mula sa Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Philippine Commission on Women, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
June 01, 2021 Tuesday
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Uniting Against Single-Use Plastic in 47th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 1 June 2021 — Big civil society organizations advocating for the phase-out of single-use plastics (SUPs) will gather virtually to discuss the dangerous effects of SUPs on people’s health, the environment, and climate, and assess the proposed Single-use Plastic Products Regulation Bill in the 47th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic, “Uniting Against Single-Use Plastic.”   The episode will air on Thursday, 3 June 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Froilan Grate, Regional Coordinator of Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives and President of Mother Earth Foundation; Atty. Gloria Ramos, Vice President of Oceana Philippines; and Marian Ledesma, anti-Plastic Campaigner of Greenpeace Philippines-Southeast Asia will join the online conversation conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now House Deputy Speaker and Antique representative Loren Legarda.   This episode will discuss plastic-free alternatives in local enterprises and alternative delivery systems and reuse solutions.   The Philippines is known for its rich marine ecosystems but is also one of the major sources of plastic trash in the world, contributing almost three million metric tons of plastic wastes and 500,000 metric tons of plastic waste leakage per year.   Plastic production and incineration use petrochemicals from fossil fuel and thus contribute to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions  and climate change.   According to the Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA), Filipinos use 59.7 billion pieces of sachets, 17.5 billion pieces of shopping bags, 16.5 billion pieces of plastic labo bag, and 1.1 billion diapers yearly.   The COVID-19 pandemic has even magnified the problem of single-use plastics as people aim to minimize contamination and further spread of the virus. This has led to utilizing easily disposable items, such as those used for food and other deliveries.   The upcoming episode will focus on non-government organizations that have worked across communities to address the problems caused by plastic pollution, and are calling for the immediate passage of the Single-use Plastic Products Regulation bill.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
June 01, 2021 Tuesday
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“Environment and Climate Action must begin with the Youth” – Young Pinoy envi, climate advocates
MANILA, 28 May 2021 — Young Filipino environmental and climate advocates highlighted the role of youth in harnessing the power of creativity and technology to become changemakers towards a better normal during the 46th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” with the topic, “Pinoy Changemakers,”   The online conversation hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda featured millennial changemakers including Antoinette Taus, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Goodwill Ambassador and founder of CORA and The Sustainable Planet; Carmela Ellaga, Fisheries Technologist; Gab Mejia, a conservation photographer and environmental storyteller; and Ranielle Navarro, a teacher from Albay Central School and 2021 National Geographic awardee, and shared their environmental advocacies, and promoted meaningful youth engagement in environmental conservation, protection, and restoration of the Earth in the new normal.   Taus shared how individual’s love, courage and purpose will push more to act on the worsening environmental degradation and climate change.   "With love, courage and purpose...You can fix all of the problems of the world for both people and the planet - love for people and love for nature. And of course, the courage to take action for the things that we believe in. And purpose, believing that every little action really means so much even if a smaller difference to make. There are no small changes and no small acts of kindness. They all mean the world to someone or to our planet," said  Taus.   Ellaga, who was recognized by former US first lady Michelle Obama for her efforts to protect the planet, stressed the importance of convergence among people to achieve a sustainable future.   “Conservation doesn’t mean protecting only wildlife and nature but it also means  protecting people, and working with them to achieve a sustainable future. People really need to work together, involving the community to work together for coastal resource management and protecting our resources,” said Ellaga.   "Part of being a conservation photographer is knowing that conservation is not just about protecting the lands and the wildlife that we have, but it's also about empowering and protecting the people who are living there - such as the local communities, marginalized communities, those disempowered people and underserved towns, and municipalities that surround these protected areas. Because in truth, we all get benefits from the environment, protected areas, and biodiversity,” said Mejia as he put emphasis on the role of photography in building awareness and mobilizing environment and climate action.   Navarro, the brain behind the “A Call to Solution: Goals for Environmental Oversight (ACS Geo),” a project that intends to develop citizen scientists, journalists, and environmental leaders through digital storytelling, geocaching, and the use of digital applications like the Marine Debris Tracker, highlighted the importance of creating new learning opportunities despite limitations of the pandemic to further influence others to act.   “That’s the purpose of digital storytelling. We tell the stories; we share the stories to others, so that there will be transformative change to the listeners, the ripple effect is that they are going to share and influence others as well,” said Navarro.   Legarda, a staunch environmental advocate, encouraged the youth to be the driving force of innovation - to transition the people from being unwitting destroyers to nurturers of the planet, as part of the goals of the UN Decade of Ecological Restoration (2021-2030).   “It is not enough that we have biodiversity conservation organizations and a Bureau to manage our parks and our wildlife. The way of life and the system of governance and development that has been causing this spasm and resulting chains and chains of extinctions will need to change. And we have a small window to do so — until 2030,” Legarda said as she shared a message in celebration of International Day of Biological Diversity last May 22nd.   “Many of us must change our life goals and our dreams so that humanity can collectively address this threat with expertise and knowledge. We need to have more biologists, ecologists, circular economy experts, renewable energy and zero waste professionals who can dream of a fresh start for the planet past 2030,” Legarda added.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation. 
May 28, 2021 Friday
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