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Build for Nature, Build with Earth
MANILA, 02 August 2021 —  The 55th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” featured housing and architectural structures that demonstrate the concepts of regenerative architecture and Earthen shelters that are disaster- and climate-resilient.   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda with co-host Atty. Ipat Luna featured nature advocates and innovators Architect Ronnie Yumang, ASEAN architect and environmental planner; and Beau Baconguis, Earth builder and permaculturist. Department of Trade and Industry – Design Center of the Philippines Executive Director Rhea Matute also joined.   “Anong klaseng bahay ba ang bagay sa Pilipinas? Dapat iakma natin ang ating pamamahay. Dito pumapasok ang disaster risk reduction. Mayroon tayong mga risks na hindi natin maiiwasan dahil na rin sa kalikasan. Maaring bawasan natin ang ating risk o ang pagkakataon na tayo’y masalanta. ‘Yun ang DRR. Component nyan, vulnerability. Dahil ang Pilipinas ay madalas tamaan ng bagyo, palakas nang palakas, patindi nang patindi dahil sa pagbabago ng klima, ay vulnerable tayo o madaling matamaan, pati na rin ng drought o ‘yung matinding tagtuyot. Apektado diyan ang pagkain, agrikultura, at fisheries. Proteksyon natin sa lahat ng elementong yan ang ating tahanan,” Legarda emphasized.   Architect Yumang, developer of Maka Forest Villas and Residences, introduced regenerative architecture systems thinking, a system that connects humans with the environment and goes beyond just conventional saving and sustainability.   “Even if we conquer the world with sustainable certified buildings, will it actually improve the condition of our Earth’s health? This will not be the only solution, we should go towards a regenerative solution. We should start replenishing our lost Earth’s plenitude. Ibig sabihin nito, kinakailangan ay punan natin ‘yung mga nawala instead na nagse-save lamang tayo, na ibalik kung ano ‘yung mga dating abundance na meron ang Earth,” said Architect Yumang.   “The world consumes 10 billion tons of cement and 50 billion tons of sand every year. It is alarming to know that these resources are finite and not renewable in the next 200 million years, and we are actually running out of sand. Hindi ito pang-habang panahon, hindi ito unlimited. Kinakailangan po ngayon na tipirin natin ito. Otherwise, if we continue to overconsume, mauubos ito at darating ‘yung panahon na magmamahal yung presyo nito,” he added.   Baconguis showed domes, vaults, and cylinder houses that can withstand climate hazards and serve as emergency shelters. She introduced SuperAdobe or Earthbag method, a building method that utilizes the basic elements of earth, water, air, and fire – soil, rice sacks and basic materials in structures.   “We need to understand first the building principles involved so we don’t compromise the structural integrity especially if you’re going to live in it. We need to increase the advocacy for Earth Architecture. There are different types of Earth Architecture methods being used here in the Philippines and we need to have networks so that we can all have a conversation together,” said Baconguis.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
August 02, 2021 Monday
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DOST, DOF, CCC, DENR partner for joint session identifying envi-friendly alternatives to plastics
MANILA, 29 July 2021 — The Philippine government continues to demonstrate stronger resolve in addressing the country’s growing problem on plastic pollution as government agencies converge to hold a conference to present and identify more sustainable alternatives and solutions to single-use plastics (SUPs).   The event, entitled “Innovations Towards Green Economy: A Joint Conference on Environment-Friendly Alternative Plastics,” is organized by the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), together with the Department of Finance (DOF), Climate Change Commission (CCC), and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), and will be held on Friday, 30 July 2021, 9:00 AM via Zoom and Facebook Live.   Resource speakers will present on policies and regulations on SUPs and feature innovative solutions through research and development. DOST Secretary Fortunato T. de la Peña, DOF Secretary and CCC chair-designate Carlos G. Dominguez, and DENR Secretary Roy A. Cimatu will deliver messages. CCC Commissioner Rachel Herrera will present on the circular economy and why this principle and value chain approach is relevant in light of the climate crisis. Industry sector representatives will also be part of the discussion.   With the House of Representatives approval and final reading of House Bill 9147 or the “Single-Use Plastic Products Regulation Act,” the conference builds momentum on further enabling the environment to addressing SUPs. Atty. Dilbert Quetulio, Committee Secretary of the House Committee on Ecology, will discuss the salient provisions of the bill and its goal to accelerate development of sustainable solutions to plastics.   Plastic is a pervasive and commonly-used material in the Philippines due to its durability, affordability, and versatility. However, plastics pose significant risks to public health and the environment, while exacerbating climate change due to the fossil fuels used in its production up to disposal.  This conference aims to support a green and just transition towards a plastic-free and more sustainable Philippines.   To join, participants are encouraged to register through this link: https://forms.gle/pDEcTomnGAvRwNpx9. For more details, please visit the Facebook pages of the DOST facebook.com/DOSTph; DOF at facebook.com/DOFPH; CCC at facebook.com/CCCPhl, and DENR at facebook.com/DENROfficial for more details.
July 29, 2021 Thursday
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Global Champion Loren Legarda and UK Minister for Adaptation and Resilience Anne-Marie Trevelyan convene civil society orgs ahead of COP26 this year
MANILA, 27 July 2021 — Three months before the crucial 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26), the British Embassy of Manila and the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda convened a virtual roundtable discussion (RTD) with several civil society organizations (CSOs) in the country.   Co-chaired by Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda and UK Minister of State for Energy, Clean Growth and Climate Change Anne-Marie Trevelyan, with support from British Ambassador to the Philippines Daniel Pruce and the Climate Change Commission, the "Road to Glasgow: A Roundtable Discussion with Non-Government Actors" aimed to solicit the views of CSOs on critical issues on adaptation and resilience in the Philippines that need to be brought forward to COP26.   “This roundtable discussion is necessary for us to be in full gear for COP26, which promises to make the Paris Agreement fully operational. Under the UK Presidency, we hope to have a COP26 that is truly inclusive and ensures accountability, musters political will, and consolidates bold commitments from all nations, especially the industrialized world,” Legarda stressed in her opening message.   "We have seen [an] increasing number of NDCs coming, half of them as ambitious as perhaps they could be and we continue to encourage robust review of that, country by country. One of the key factors we mentioned is that we are driving really hard for coal phase-out, because coal is one of the clearest polluters. There are alternatives as well, therefore we are pushing for that,” said Trevelyan.   The discussion also aimed to increase understanding of climate change adaptation and resilience priorities in the Philippines from CSOs who are actively engaged in the climate space and to gather their insights on the role of non-government actors to help achieve a whole-of-society, inclusive COP26.   The CSOs in the RTD expressed their support in lobbying leaders’ commitment on the four goals of COP26: Mitigation – secure global net-zero and keep 1.5 degrees within reach; Adaptation – urgently adapt to protect communities and natural habitats; Mobilizing finance, and Collaboration – work together to accelerate action.   Statements from the CSOs expressed optimism, a sense of urgency, and the need for accountability and ambition for the COP:   "We hope that we can agree in Glasgow to more ambition-raising mechanisms, not just every five years. If we can create platforms to which the countries can increase their ambitions without having to wait for five years, then it will save a lot in terms of catching up to the lost time because of COVID-19, but also that we can look towards a transformational momentum that goes across beyond our countries and regions to one where the world could actually work together towards economy and investment,” said Red Constantino, Executive Director of the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities.   "We cannot frame climate change as an intergenerational responsibility if we exclude the younger generations and limit these discussions to those who have allowed our planet to be in this state of the climate crisis we are in. We hope that COP26 will genuinely provide meaningful space and a platform for our young climate leaders to communicate their thoughts, exchange ideas, and seek support for their initiatives,” said Nazrin Castro, Country Manager of The Climate Reality Project-Philippines.   "Being with Living Laudato Si’ Philippines, there should be the recognition of the role of faith communities, both moral and active forces to ensure higher ambitions. It would be a strategic approach of COP26 Presidency, different from any other COPs, especially the presence of Pope Francis, hopefully, in Glasgow, and the participation of many faith-based organizations, religions, in global pilgrimages leading to Scotland,” said Rodne Galicha, National Convenor of Aksyon Klima Pilipinas. He also sought measures to ensure prioritization of climate finance in the COP—financing in the form of grants, not loans, which may be negotiated bilaterally.   “We know that the Paris Agreement is intended to be a durable and long-term agreement and it should have room for innovation and further elaboration on the strategies and approaches,” said Gia Ibay, Head of the Climate Change and Energy Programme of the World Wide Fund for Nature – Philippines. She called for an “all hands on deck, whole-of-society approach” in addressing the climate crisis, particularly in drawing the path for a green COVID-19 recovery where the potential of nature-based solutions are maximized.   “It is imperative that we make sure that women's global voices, interests, and perspectives are fairly represented at the leadership of COP26. Climate change is a huge threat, but women play a fundamental role in our fight against it. Any problems we face as a result will be easier to solve if both men and women are equally included in solving them,” said Atty. Maica Teves, Executive Director of SPARK! Philippines.   "One legacy of the UK COP Presidency is to operationalize nature-based solutions, distinguish it from adaptation, and link it up with clear, ambitious, with measurable finance,” said Atty. Ping Peria, adviser to the Philippines’ climate change adaptation, loss and damage, and agriculture themes at the UN climate change negotiations.   The COP26, happening from October 31 to November 12 of this year in Glasgow, Scotland under the presidency of the United Kingdom, in partnership with Italy, is a momentous time for governments to report and strengthen their commitments toward the fulfillment of the six-year-old Paris Agreement on Climate Change.   In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the conference was re-scheduled from its initial schedule in November 2020 to ensure that all parties can focus on containing the spread of the virus.   The Philippines is further advancing the implementation of Paris Agreement targets as it officially submitted its ambitious Nationally Determined Contributions in April 2021, bannering a projected 75% greenhouse gas emissions reduction and avoidance, of which 2.71% is unconditional and 72.29% is conditional, representing the country's ambition for GHG mitigation for the period 2020 to 2030 for the sectors of agriculture, wastes, industry, transport, and energy.   The Philippines is also the first in the region to set a moratorium on new coal-fired power plants and to expand the use of renewables for both environmental and reliability purposes. This could reduce emissions by 32-35% in 2030 in comparison to current policy projections.   In closing, Legarda stressed that: "We are all in this together. We must all campaign for nature, for 1.5C, for loss and damage, for climate adaptation, for mobilizing finance, and to make sure that COP26 will make history to be a successful COP where we were able to operationalize the four goals we set at the beginning with the UK COP Presidency."   See the latest updates on the upcoming COP26 by visiting its official website at https://ukcop26.org/.
July 27, 2021 Tuesday
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Environment-friendly and regenerative architecture in 55th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 27 July 2021 — Filipino environmental advocates will gather virtually to demonstrate environment-friendly and regenerative architectural innovation on the 55th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic, “Building for Nature.”   The episode, conceptualized and hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 29 July 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are Filipino innovators Architect Ronnie Yumang, ASEAN architect and environmental planner and Beau Baconguis, Earth builder and permaculturist.   The Philippines, due to its geographical location, is known for its vulnerability to natural hazards such as frequent earthquakes, volcanic eruptions as well as typhoons, sea-level rise, storm surges, landslides, flooding, and drought affecting the lives of every Filipino.   Hence, the challenge of adapting to the climate and reducing disaster risks cut across sectors and industries, including the field of architecture.   The upcoming episode will feature resilient and regenerative architectural practices and SuperAdobe technology as a sustainable solution to the shelter challenge.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
July 27, 2021 Tuesday
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Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Practices in 54th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 20 July 2021 — Officials and researchers from various State Universities and Colleges (SUCs) in the country will gather virtually to raise awareness on the indigenous knowledge systems and practices (IKSPs) on sustainable development and environmental conservation, and promote the documentation and safeguarding of traditional knowledge systems during the 54th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic, “Traditional Knowledge is Power!”   The episode, conceptualized and hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 22 July 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are SUCs that lead the way in the documentation of IKSPs including Dr. Serafin Ngohayon from Ifugao State University; Ms. Anna Razel Ramirez from University of the Philippines - Visayas; Dr. Pablo Crespo, President of University of Antique; and Mr. Sajed Ingilan of the University of Southeastern Philippines.   IKSPs provide insights and tools for environmental protection, sustainable resource management, disaster risk reduction, and climate change adaptation. They are developed over centuries and are passed from generation to generation.   The upcoming episode will feature some of the IKSPs in the country including those featured in the books “From the Seas to the Mountain -- Panay-Guimaras Traditional Knowledge Systems,” a product of extensive research and collaborative efforts of SUCs in Western Visayas to document and promote the various traditional knowledge systems in the region; “Ifugao Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Practices,” which documents the traditional knowledge, resourcefulness, and creativity of the Ifugao in building a sustainable community and surviving with their own rich culture; and “Disasters Preparedness and Climate Change: The Indigenous Knowledge of Selected IP Groups in the Davao Region.” These books were funded through the initiative of Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda in collaboration with SUCs and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
July 20, 2021 Tuesday
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Climate change is a human rights crisis according to the UN Human Rights Council
MANILA, 19 July 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) lauded the adoption of a Resolution by the United Nations Human Rights Council on the importance of addressing the adverse consequences of climate change, which in effect curtails human rights.   According to the Resolution, solutions are urgently needed, including the possible creation of a new special procedure addressing the adverse impacts of climate change on the full and effective enjoyment of human rights, especially for the people most vulnerable to climate change in developing countries like the Philippines.   The CCC cited scientific findings from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), another UN body, that the average global temperature has risen by more than 1°C since the industrial age and we are already experiencing unprecedented extreme weather events. The world cannot afford to go beyond the 1.5°C threshold of survival, and to do so must cut planet-warming carbon emissions by half by year 2030. Any higher degree of warming would be disastrous for most of natural systems, threatening our access to quality food, water, shelter, livelihood, and the right to life itself.   According to the CCC, the Resolution places significant focus on the right of all persons to ecological security and to live without fear of their homes, livelihoods, or cultures being threatened with destruction because of the climate crisis. All persons have the right to life, and that includes the right to survive and thrive as human beings.   In terms of the total global carbon emissions that are warming the planet, the Philippines contributes only one-third of one percent, yet Filipinos bear the brunt of extreme weather events as millions get displaced, thousands of lives and livelihoods are lost, and billions worth of agriculture and infrastructure are damaged annually because of climate change.   The climate body hailed the leadership of the Philippines in pursuing climate change as an essential aspect in discussions on human rights by the international community. The Human Rights Council also decided to incorporate into its annual programme of work, beginning in 2023, discussions on different specific themes on the adverse impacts of climate change on human rights. 
July 19, 2021 Monday
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Development Bank of the Philippines now an Accredited Entity to the Green Climate Fund
MANILA, 19 July 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) welcomed the accreditation of the Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP) as a medium-sized accredited entity to access financing from the Green Climate Fund (GCF) for climate projects of up to US$250 million.   "We congratulate the Development Bank of the Philippines for this very timely accreditation, as the country continues to open up channels to access climate finance. We urge the DBP to leverage GCF funds to support our country's shift to climate-resilient development pathway, veering away from fossil fuels while we continue to grow our economy," said CCC Commissioner Rachel Herrera, who also serves as GCF alternate Board Member.   "The DBP went through a stringent accreditation process and was favorably assessed in its ability to manage funds consistent with the GCF’s fiduciary standards, and avoid environmental and social risks that may arise in implementing projects," Herrera added.   Accredited entities serve as the GCF’s partners at the national level to develop and submit transformative proposals that allow countries to adapt to climate impacts and also reduce or avoid carbon emissions. As they serve as channels through which GCF financing shall flow, they work with the country stakeholders to ensure that the portfolio of climate projects respond to actual country needs.   With the approval, made during the Board's 29th Meeting on 1 July 2021, the DBP is now the country’s second national institution to access the GCF, with the Land Bank of the Philippines earlier accredited in 2018.   The GCF Accreditation Panel, which assessed the DBP’s accreditation proposal before endorsing to the GCF Board, also noted of the bank’s commitment to contributing to the realization of the Philippines Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC) and to deploy GCF resources for projects that are considered risky due to financial, social or market barriers, but which have significant potential impacts on climate change mitigation and adaptation.
July 19, 2021 Monday
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“Let our children learn and connect more with nature”
MANILA, 18 July 2021 — The 53rd episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” featured administrators of museums, farms, and institutions that provide children with rich and instinctive environmental learning and encourage families to engage more with nature-based activities amid the pandemic.   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda featured managers of children recreational facilities including Bambi Mañosa-Tanjutco,  President of Museo Pambata, with daughters Isabella and Natasha Tanjutco of Kids for Kids; Edeline Payawal, Manager of Hiraya Childhood Playfarm; and Sharon Cortez, Founder of Forest School Philippines.   Bambi Mañosa-Tanjutco, with daughters Isabella and Natasha, shared how Kids for Kids work with Museo Pambata, and how they are advocating for children’s rights by creating safe spaces for them.   “We saw that the world is now evolving, and it’s either people adapt or we will get left behind. So, it’s important that we do adapt because the future for children – we are 100% of tomorrow and so we should really be involved in creating that safe environment for children to thrive in,” said Isabella Tanjutco.   “Our dream is, we would like Museo Pambata to be the leading youth hub in the country that would amplify the voice of the youth and generations of Filipino gamechangers. We would like to breed these kinds of people and I think the future of kids is so important [since] they will be the leaders of tomorrow. We put that in our hearts, we plant the seeds today, and they will be the adults that we will look upon tomorrow,” said Bambi Mañosa-Tanjutco.   Payawal showed how they developed Hiraya Childhood Play Farm, an open space where families can have the freedom to move, explore and connect with nature. The guests can reconnect with their inner child and re-live their treasured childhood memories. The farm also enables children to learn about farm life and rural living.   “Since we’re kids, we grew up in the province. Nae-enjoy namin yung simpleng buhay, mga simpleng laro. When we got older, when adulting gets to you and life becomes more complicated, more stressful, and there’s more pressure, there’s also more appreciation when it comes to the simple life, and also more appreciation of your childhood, your past. We started dreaming of having a space of our own, for our family, and also for our kids. We wanted to create a version of a world we want to live in,” said Payawal.   Cortez put emphasis on the role of the environment in shaping the future of today’s children.   “Ang mga karanasan nila mula sa pagkabata ay mahalaga kung paano sila makikipagsalamuha sa kalikasan, sa kanilang paglaki. Kaya po sa Forest School Philippines, and hangad po namin ay maranasan ng mga bata ang nature connectedness. Ayon sa saliksik, ‘Adult environmentalism have been shown to derive from deep and positive childhood experiences in nature,’” said Cortez.   Legarda then reiterated the importance of interacting with the natural world, especially with the children that are mostly affected by pandemic as their learning are only limited with gadgets, making them slowly disconnected from nature.   “We must not limit a museum into the four concrete walls. A museum is a life, nature is a museum, biodiversity is our home. I think we should have Museo Pambata not just in Metro Manila, but for every region. One bill I can file is the establishment of a children’s nature playground museum in every municipality when applicable,” said Legarda.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
July 18, 2021 Sunday
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Edukasyong Pang-Kapaligiran para sa mga Bata sa ika-53 na episode ng seryeng ‘Stories for a Better Normal’
MAYNILA, ika-14 ng Hulyo taong 2021 — Magtitipon-tipon virtually ang mga organizers ng mga parke at institusyon na naghahandog ng rich at instinctive environmental learning sa mga bata upang hikayatin ang mga pamilya na makilahok sa mga nature-based activities sa kabila ng pandemya sa ika-53 na episode ng seryeng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” na may temang, “Restore Our Earth (Children’s Edition).”   Ang online na talakayan, na hango sa konsepto ng dating three-term Senator, na ngayo’y Deputy Speaker at Antique Representative Loren Legarda, ay ipapalabas sa Huwebes, ika-15 ng Hulyo 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live sa facebook.com/CCCPhl at facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Kabilang sa online na talakayan sina Bambi Mañosa-Tanjutco, President at CEO ng Museo Pambata, kasama ang kanyang mga anak na sina Isabella at Natasha Tanjutco ng Kids for Kids; Edeline Payawal, Manager ng Hiraya Childhood Playfarm; at Shawi Cortez, Founder ng Forest School Philippines, upang talakayin ang iba't-ibang mga nakakaaliw na aktibidad na nagtuturo ng environmental awareness at learning sa mga bata.   Ang kalikasan ay may napakahalagang papel na ginagampanan sa paglaki ng isang bata. Ang pagkakaroon ng physical contact ng bata sa natural world ay makakatulong sa progreso ng pagkatuto at paglaki ng bata.   Para sa maraming pamilya na nakatira sa lungsod o may urban lifestyle, at lalo ngayong may pandemya, bihirang makalabas ang mga bata sa outdoors, kung kaya't nalimitahan ang learning environment ng mga bata gamit ang mga gadgets. Ang kakulangan ng sensorial stimulation mula sa direktang pakikipag-ugnayan sa natural environment ay maaring makabawas rin ng interes sa usapin ng pangangalaga ng kalikasan.   Mula sa episode ay makakakuha ng tips ang mga viewers, tulad ng mga magulang at guro, kung paano tuturuang mapalapit ang kanilang mga anak at mga estudyante sa kalikasan at kung paano nila mapalaki ang mga ito na mayroong magandang pagtingin sa mundong kanilang ginagalawan at maituro ang responsibilidad na ginagampanan ng kabataan.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan at kamalayang pang-kapaligiran, naglalayon ang Stories for a Better Normal na baguhin ang kaisipan ng bawat Pilipino at pamayanan sa mga hamon ng climate change at ng pandemya, tungo sa buhay na maka-kalikasan at sustainable sa ilalim ng ‘better normal’.   Ang online na talakayan na ito ay na-organisa sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission, na binigyang-suporta naman ng Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines at Mother Earth Foundation.
July 14, 2021 Wednesday
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Envi education for kids in 53rd episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 13 July 2021 — Organizers of parks and institutions that provide children with rich and instinctive environmental learning will gather virtually to encourage families to engage more with nature-based activities amid the pandemic on the 53rd episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic, “Restore Our Earth (Children’s Edition).”   The program, conceptualized and hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 15 July 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are managers of children recreational facilities including Bambi Mañosa-Tanjutco,  President and CEO of Museo Pambata, with daughters Isabella and Natasha Tanjutco of Kids for Kids; Edeline Payawal, Manager of Hiraya Childhood Playfarm; and Shawi Cortez, Founder of Forest School Philippines, to discuss fun activities for kids while at the same time providing environmental awareness and learning.   Nature plays a significant role in a child's growth. It is said that having physical contact with the natural world can positively impact a child’s acquisition of knowledge and development.   However, as the urban lifestyle progresses, people slowly become disconnected to the natural world, and the pandemic further shifted the life of children completely indoors that made learning and playing primarily through gadgets. The lack of sensorial stimulation and learning from touch, smell, and feel in nature is seen as breeding apathy towards environmental concerns.   The upcoming episode will provide tips to viewers, especially parents and teachers, on how to bring their children and students closer to nature towards raising them to have a healthy relationship with the world around them and teaching them the role of the youth in restoring the Earth.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
July 13, 2021 Tuesday
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Nominasyon para sa National Panel of Technical Experts
MAYNILA, ika-12 ng Hulyo taong 2021 — Binuksan ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) ang mga nominasyon para sa kanilang National Panel of Technical Experts (NPTE).   Ang NPTE ay kinabibilangan ng mga eksperto sa iba't-ibang mga disiplinang may kaugnayan sa climate change na nagbibigay ng scientific technical advice sa Commission ukol sa climate science at teknolohiya, at sa best practices sa risk assessment at enhancement ng adaptive capacity of vulnerable human settlements sa climate change, alinsunod sa Climate Change Act of 2009.   Sa pagbubukas ng mga bagong nominasyon, naglalayong ma-enhance ang proseso ng nomination, selection, at appointment sa NPTE at mapalawak pa ang pool of experts ng bansa sa climate change. Masisiguro din nito ang institutional, regional, at sectoral representation, at gender balance ng NPTE membership.   Alinsunod sa CCC Resolution No. 2021-004, maaring mag nominate ng mga kilalalang eksperto sa mga sumusunod na fields of discipline at may kaugnayan sa climate science, public policy at administration, at climate risk governance:   1.  Natural sciences: Climate change science and meteorology, Earth science and oceanography, Natural science, Environment, biodiversity, and human ecology, Health, agriculture and food security, Water and hydrology, Climate change adaptation and mitigation, Disaster risk reduction and management, Renewable energy and sustainable energy, and Low-emission infrastructure and transport;   2.  Social sciences: Sustainable development, Development planning and management, Sociology and anthropology, Geography, Political science, Demography and population studies, Development communication, and Ethnic studies, including gender policies;   3.   Law: Environmental law, International climate diplomacy and negotiations, and International law;   4. Economics: Economics, Climate finance, Sustainable finance, Circular economy, Sustainable consumption and production, Ecological solid waste management, Sustainable delivery of goods and services, and Analysis of potential loss and damage and disruption of services from climate change risk or impacts;   5.  Data science: Mathematics, Climate change risk assessment, Climate change data ecosystem and analytics, Greenhouse gas inventory, and Climate change expenditure tagging;   6. Governance: Implementation of policy frameworks and strategies, program and project management; National security administration; Policy research and development, Technology needs assessment; and Monitoring, evaluation and impact assessment of programs and projects related to climate change adaptation and mitigation and disaster risk reduction and management, with preference to those with relevant work in rural and coastal communities; and   7.   Priority thematic areas of the National Climate Change Action Plan and other technical areas relevant to the mandates and work of the CCC.   Ang nominado ay kinakailangang: (1) Filipino citizen; (2) may proven track record sa kanyang field of expertise; (3) hindi kailanman napatunayang gumawa ng plagiarism, o nahatulan ng crime of moral turpitude; (4) walang conflict of interest sa mandato ng CCC or NPTE; (5) hindi nagkaroon ng position laban sa ating mga katutubo o indigenous peoples; and (6) kilala bilang authority sa climate change kasabay na rin sa alinman sa mga nailistang fields of discipline.   Upang mag nominate, magpadala ng pirmadong liham o duly signed official letter sa CCC, kalakip ang mga dokumento na syang nagpapatunay sa qualifications at integridad ng nominado. Sinumang kandidato para sa NPTE ay maaari lamang i-nominate ng katuwang nyang government agency, o di kaya'y isang academic o research institution, civil society organization, o private sector stakeholder. Anumang private sector nominating institution o entity ay kinakailangang rehistrado ng Securities and Exchange Commission.   Ang deadline para sa submission ng nomination letters ay sa Huwebes, ika-15 ng Hulyo 2021. Para sa updates at iba pang mga information ukol sa qualifications at requirements, bisitahin ang website at social media pages ng Climate Change Commission o contact the NPTE Secretariat at npte-sec@climate.gov.ph.
July 12, 2021 Monday
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"Kung luntian ang bawat isa, maaring maging luntiang Pilipinas!"
MAYNILA, ika-12 ng Hulyo taong 2021 — Sa ika-52 episode ng seryeng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” itinampok ang mga eksperto sa pangangalaga at pagpapalaganap ng katutubong mga halaman ng Pilipinas kung saan binigyang diin nila ang mahalagang papel ng mga ito sa pagpapabuti ng ating biodiversity at sa pag-adapt sa climate change.   Itinampok sa online na talakayan, na hango sa konsepto ng dating three-term Senator, na ngayo’y Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda ang mga Philippine indigenous plant advocates na sina Architect Rey Solero ng Philippine Native Plants Conservation Society, Inc.; Ronald Achacoso, Curator ng the Pinto Arboretum of Philippine Plants; Prof. Liezl M. Atienza, Registered Nutritionist-Dietician mula sa University of the Philippines – Los Banos; at Leo Fuentes ng Magsasaka at Siyentipiko para sa Pag-unlad ng Agrikultura sa Mindanao.   Ang episode na ito, kasama ang isa sa mga nangungunang environmental lawyer ng bansa na si Atty. Ipat Luna, ay nagbigay-liwanag sa usapin ng pagtatanim ng mga halaman, puno at bulaklak mula sa isang ecological perspective – bakit kailangan nating sikaping magtanim ng mga puno at mga palumpong na katutubo, paano itinatabi at pinaparami ng mga katutubong Pilipino ang katutubong mga binhi, at anong mga katutubong halaman ang mainam na gamiting gamot at nakabubuti kalusugan.   "Sa ekolohiya, ang lahat ay magkakaugnay sa bawat isa. Kung tayo ay nabibighani sa pink flowers ng cherry blossom, itatanim natin yan dito, kung saan hindi ito nag co-evolve kasama ng iba pang mga species, nakatanim ito sa lupa na para sana sa isang Philippine tree na hindi makikita sa ibang bahagi mundo. Ang endemic nating mga puno ay nanganganib na maubos, ang anumang punong itatanim natin ay titindig sa lupang hindi ginamit para sagipin sila mula sa pagkaubos. Kaya naman sa bawat pagtatanim natin, kailangan nating piliin ang tamang mga halamang itatanim sa akmang habitat," sabi ni Atty. Ipat Luna.   Tinalakay ni Architect Rey Solero, na isa ring magsasaka at environmentalist, ang pangangalaga sa ating endangered na Philippine native plants and flora, at ang kanyang adbokasiya sa pagtataguyod ng sustainable and regenerative lifestyle sa pamamagitan ng paglikha ng mga man-made environments na konektado sa natural environment.   “Pag sinabing 'Save indigenous plants' parang gargantuan task - pero hindi po. Tayo po ay may malaking magagawa kahit hindi natin alam kung ano yung mga native o indigenous plants. Mag-compost po tayo, mahalin natin sila, start sowing, start appreciating, start conserving,” sabi ni Architect Rey Solero.   Ipinakilala ni Ronald Achacoso ang Pinto Arboretrum, isang botanical showcase ng katubong mga puno ng Pilipinas at iba pang mga plant groups na katutubo rin. Isinusulong ni Ronald Achacoso ang pagkaka-ugnay ng siyensya at sining, bilang dalawang magkaibang mga kasanayan.   “Kapag sinabi mong Arboretum, ito ay isang hardin ng mga puno. Sa katunayan, kung pupunta ka sa isang rainforest, bibihirang maituring mo ang mga ito bilang mga puno. Itong mga puno natin ay parang mga micro-habitats, maraming nakatirang halaman diyan, sa garden of trees I also incorporated all the other Philippine native plant groups,” sabi ni Achacoso.   Ibinahagi ni Prof. Liezl M. Atienza ang mga nutritional benefits na makukuha sa katutubong mga halaman ng Pilipinas at ang  potensyal na mayroon ang Philippine berries.   “Ngayon po ay kulang pa ang pag-aaral sa ating sariling berries kaya kami po, as part of a research team in UPLB and also a dietitian and nutrition scientist, ang inaaral po natin ay ang ating mga native o indigenous berries. Ito po ay ang bignay, duhat at lipote. Naniniwala po tayo na ang ating Philippine berries and other indigenous crops ay mayaman sa bioactive compounds na may health promoting property. Maganda sa kalusugan, maganda sa nutrisyon, pampalakas ng immune system lalo sa panahon ng pandemya ay pwede ring maging source of income,” sabi ni Prof. Atienza.   Si Leo Fuentes, na Regional Coordinator para sa Mindanao ng MASIPAG – Magsasaka at Siyentipiko para sa Pag-unlad ng Agrikultura, na isang pambansang network ng mga magsasaka, siyentipiko, at mga NGOs na nagsusulong ng sustainable na pamamahala ng ating biodiversity, ay nagbahagi tungkol sa Lalapung o ang tradisyonal na pamamaraan ng pag-iimbak ng binhi ng mga lumad.   “Tandaan po natin na ‘yung prinsipyo sa ecology na ito ay shared world. Sa ating pang-araw araw na buhay ay huwag po nating kalimutan na ang mga katutubo natin ay patuloy na nangangalaga sa ating kalikasan,” pagbabahagi ni Fuentes.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan at kamalayang pang-kapaligiran, naglalayon ang Stories for a Better Normal na baguhin ang kaisipan ng bawat Pilipino at pamayanan sa mga hamon ng climate change at ng pandemya, tungo sa buhay na maka-kalikasan at sustainable sa ilalim ng ‘better normal’.   Na-organisa ang online na talakayang ito mula sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission na binigyang-suporta naman ng Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines at Mother Earth Foundation. 
July 12, 2021 Monday
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CCC on World Population Day: Stronger Climate Action Needed to Keep Families, Communities Safe
MANILA, 9 July 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) underscored the need for urgent climate action to keep families and communities safe amid worsening climate impacts, in observance of World Population Day on Sunday, July 11.   July 11th of every year is declared World Population Day through UN Resolution 45/216, with the aim of bringing attention to various population-related issues including poverty, health, human rights, equality, environmental degradation, and the importance of population management.   Human population growth has increased demand for fossil fuels like oil, gas, and coal, which all emit massive amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. According to the UN Population Fund, the world's population increased from 1.6 billion in 1900 to over 7.5 billion in just over a century—during which carbon dioxide emissions also increased twelve-fold.   By 2050, the world's population is anticipated to reach nine billion. Without changes in how we live and we do business across all levels and sectors—especially in terms of extracting natural resources and emitting carbon—global warming will only worsen in the coming years and decades. And during a climate crisis—just as we have seen around the world during the pandemic—it is the most vulnerable families and communities that will be hit the hardest.   Today is a call for individuals, families, communities, and government leaders at all levels to take concrete steps to change how we live and how we treat the world and those we share it with: Undertake lifestyle changes at homes, schools, and offices; pursue sustainable and circular business practices and models; ingrain climate awareness and spark action in communities through initiatives like going zero-plastic, starting community gardens, and improving waste management.   The CCC reiterates: now is the time for everyone to act. The longer the delay, the more painful and expensive the consequences will be. On the other hand, stronger and timelier climate action can save more lives, avoid trillions of dollars of economic damage globally, and secure resilience for families and communities not just today, but in years and decades still to come.
July 09, 2021 Friday
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CCC raises alarm over UN report, calls for swift, ambitious action to ensure humanity’s survival
MANILA, 9 July 2021 — The Philippine Climate Change Commission (CCC) called on developed countries to commit to more urgent and ambitious action to address the climate crisis as a leaked landmark climate report of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) appears to warn of alarming impacts which may be closer than people expect.     ““The developed world is most responsible for the climate emergency, but it is the developing world that is disproportionately burdened and bearing the brunt of climate change impacts. Our people must not just survive but also thrive amid the changing climate, and the commitment of developed nations to equitable and fair response and support to the climate vulnerable developing nations is key,” CCC Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman said.   The 4,000-page draft report of the IPCC, created to provide policymakers with regular scientific assessments on climate change, provides a comprehensive assessment of how climate risks will alter all life on earth, and warns that the planet is reaching climate tipping points—which, as scientists note, means the consequences will become unavoidable, and over time the impacts may be more dramatic, widespread, and devastating.   For instance, as the report notes, unlivable heat, ecosystem collapse, species extinction, widespread diseases, and cities buckling under rising sea levels are just some of the accelerating effects which are bound to be more obvious before a child born today turns 30.   It adds that tens of millions of more people are likely to face chronic hunger, while 130 million more could experience extreme poverty within a decade if inequality is allowed to deepen. Coastal cities on the “front line” of the climate crisis will see hundreds of millions of people at risk from floods and increasingly frequent storm surges made more deadly by rising seas.   Some 350 million more people living in urban areas will be exposed to water scarcity from severe droughts at 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming – 410 million at two degrees Celsius. The extra half-degree will also mean 420 million more people exposed to extreme and potentially lethal heatwaves.   “Life on Earth can recover from a drastic climate shift by evolving into new species and creating new ecosystems…humans cannot,” the draft report warns.   The scheduled release of the report would have been in February next year, or three months after the 26th Conference of Parties where global leaders and policymakers will gather to craft agreements on accelerated action under the goals of the Paris Agreement and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. The draft report provides a grimmer scenario compared to previous reports, and says that current levels of adaptation are inadequate to respond to impending risks.   The draft report also mentioned that climate change and global warming impacts are amplified by human intervention which includes losses of habitat and resilience, over-exploitation, water extraction, pollution, invasive non-native species and dispersal of pests and diseases.   It adds that while the effects of the crisis can no longer be averted, there are steps that must be taken to prepare communities for the impact and avoid worst-case scenarios. For instance, conserving and restoring blue carbon ecosystems like kelp and mangrove forests will enhance carbon stocks and protect against storm surges, while also providing wildlife habitats, coastal livelihoods, and food security. The report also mentions the need to shift to more plant-based diets, which could help reduce food-related emissions by as much as 70% by 2050.   Overall, however, the report warns that such shifts in isolation will not be enough.   “We need transformational change operating on processes and behaviors at all levels: individual, communities, business, institutions and governments,” the report says. “We must redefine our way of life and consumption.” 
July 09, 2021 Friday
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“It’s not enough to go green, we have to go Philippine green!”
Conserving seeds is one way to preserve and propagate indigenous and native plants.  Photo from presentation of Architect Rey Solero of the Philippine Native Plants Conservation Society, Inc. MANILA, 9 July 2021 —  The 52nd episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” featured experts in the preservation and propagation of Philippine indigenous plants to promote its critical role in enhancing biodiversity and adapting to climate change, and the protection and utilization of the indigenous crops and plants.   The online conversation conceptualized by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda featured Philippine indigenous plant advocates including Architect Rey Solero of the Philippine Native Plants Conservation Society, Inc.; Ronald Achacoso, Curator of the Pinto Arboretum of Philippine Plants; Prof. Liezl M. Atienza, a Registered Nutritionist-Dietician from the University of the Philippines – Los Banos (UPLB); and Leo Fuentes of the Magsasaka at Siyentipiko para sa Pag-unlad ng Agrikultura sa Mindanao.   This episode, hosted by environmental lawyer Ipat Luna, shed light on growing plants, trees, and flowers from an ecological perspective – why we should strive to plant trees and shrubs that are indigenous or native to the area, how indigenous people save and propagate indigenous seeds, and what indigenous plants are medicinal and good for the health.   "In ecology, everything is connected to everything else.  So if, enamored by the pink flowers of the cherry blossom, we plant it here, where it did not co-evolve with other species, it is taking up space that could have gone to a Philippine tree that is found nowhere else in the world.  Our endemic trees are endangered, and any tree we plant will be land that is not used to wrest them from extinction. So each time we plant, we have to be intentional and pick the right plants suited for the habitat,” said Atty. Luna.   Architect Solero, who is also a farmer and environmentalist, tackled the conservation of endangered Philippine native plants and flora, and his advocacy of promoting sustainable and regenerative lifestyle by creating man-made environments that are aligned, connected, and integrated with the natural environment and do not depart from natural systems.   “’Pag sinabing 'Save indigenous plants' parang gargantuan task - pero hindi po. Tayo po ay may malaking magagawa kahit hindi natin alam kung ano yung mga native o indigenous plants. Mag-compost po tayo, mahalin natin sila, start sowing, start appreciating, start conserving,” said Architect Solero.   Achacoso introduced Pinto Arboretrum, a botanical showcase of Philippine native trees and other plant groups that are indigenous. He advocates the linkages of science and art, two polarizing disciplines.   “When you say Arboretum, it is a garden of trees. Actually, if you go to a rainforest, you’ll seldom see our trees as entities in themselves. Itong mga puno natin parang mga micro-habitats, maraming nakatirang halaman diyan, sa garden of trees ko I also incorporated all the other Philippine native plant groups,” said Achacoso.   Prof. Atienza shared the nutritional benefits of Philippine indigenous plants and the potential of Philippine berries.   “Ngayon po ay kulang pa ang pag-aaral sa ating sariling berries kaya kami po, as part of a research team in UPLB and also a dietitian and nutrition scientist, ang inaaral po natin ay ang ating mga native o indigenous berries. Ito po ay ang bignay, duhat at lipote. Naniniwala po tayo na ang ating Philippine berries and other indigenous crops ay mayaman sa bioactive compounds na may health promoting property. Maganda sa kalusugan, maganda sa nutrisyon, pampalakas ng immune system lalo sa panahon ng pandemya ay pwede ring maging source of income,” said Prof. Atienza.   Fuentes, the Regional Coordinator for Mindanao of MASIPAG – Magsasaka at Siyentipiko para sa Pag-unlad ng Agrikultura, a national network of farmers, scientists, and NGOs that promotes sustainable use and management of biodiversity through farmers control of genetic and biological resources, production, and knowledge – shared about Lalapung, or the traditional seed storage of Lumads in Mindanao.   “Tandaan po natin na ‘yung prinsipyo sa ecology na ito ay shared world. Sa ating pang-araw araw na buhay ay huwag po nating kalimutan na ang mga katutubo natin ay patuloy na nangangalaga sa ating kalikasan,” said Fuentes.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
July 09, 2021 Friday
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Nominations open for CCC’s National Panel of Technical Experts
MANILA, 8 July 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) announces its call for nominations for the National Panel of Technical Experts (NPTE).   The NPTE is composed of experts in various disciplines related to climate change that provides technical advice to the Commission in climate science, technologies, and best practices for risk assessment and enhancement of the adaptive capacity of vulnerable human settlements to potential impacts of climate change, in accordance with the RA 9729 or the Climate Change Act of 2009.   The call aims to enhance the nomination, selection, and appointment process of the NPTE membership to broaden the country’s pool of experts on climate change. This will also ensure the institutional, regional, and sectoral representation of the NPTE membership, with special consideration for gender balance.   Pursuant to the Rule VII of the Revised-Implementing Rules and Regulations of RA 9729, as amended and the CCC Resolution No. 2021-004, the CCC invites government agencies and offices, academic and research institutions, and other relevant stakeholders to nominate reputed experts, professionals and practitioners, in any of the following fields of discipline related to climate science, public policy and administration, and climate risk governance:   1.  Natural sciences: Climate change science and meteorology, Earth science and oceanography, Natural science, Environment, biodiversity, and human ecology, Health, agriculture and food security, Water and hydrology, Climate change adaptation and mitigation, Disaster risk reduction and management, Renewable energy and sustainable energy, and Low-emission infrastructure and transport;   2.  Social sciences: Sustainable development, Development planning and management, Sociology and anthropology, Geography, Political science, Demography and population studies, Development communication, and Ethnic studies, including gender policies;   3.    Law: Environmental law, International climate diplomacy and negotiations, and International law;   4.  Economics: Economics, Climate finance, Sustainable finance, Circular economy, Sustainable consumption and production, Ecological solid waste management, Sustainable delivery of goods and services, and Analysis of potential loss and damage and disruption of services from climate change risk or impacts;   5.  Data science: Mathematics, Climate change risk assessment, Climate change data ecosystem and analytics, Greenhouse gas inventory, and Climate change expenditure tagging;   6. Governance: Implementation of policy frameworks and strategies, program and project management; National security administration; Policy research and development, Technology needs assessment; and Monitoring, evaluation and impact assessment of programs and projects related to climate change adaptation and mitigation and disaster risk reduction and management, with preference to those with relevant work in rural and coastal communities; and   7.    Priority thematic areas of the National Climate Change Action Plan and other technical areas relevant to the mandates and work of the CCC.   The nominee must possess the following qualifications: (1) A Filipino citizen; (2) has a proven track record in his/her field of expertise; (3) has not committed plagiarism or has not been convicted of a crime of moral turpitude; (4) has no conflict of interest with the mandate of the CCC or NPTE, or shall endeavor to avoid any situation involving an actual conflict of interest, or the appearance of a conflict of interest; (5) has not taken any position against indigenous peoples; and (6) a reputed and a recognized authority on climate change or any of the above specific fields of discipline, as it relates to climate science, public policy, or risk governance.   The nomination must be in the form of a duly signed official letter addressed to the CCC, accompanied by documents that attest to the qualifications and integrity of the nominee. Any candidate for the NPTE shall be nominated by a government agency, an academic or research institution, civil society organization, or private sector stakeholder. Any private sector nominating institution or entity must be duly-registered within the Securities and Exchange Commission.   The deadline for submission of nomination letters is on or before Thursday next week, 15 July 2021. For updates and more information on the qualifications and requirements, visit the website and social media pages of the Climate Change Commission or contact the NPTE Secretariat at npte-sec@climate.gov.ph. 
July 08, 2021 Thursday
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The call for nominations to the National Panel of Technical Experts of the Climate Change Commission is NOW OPEN.
ANNOUNCEMENT The call for nominations to the National Panel of Technical Experts of the Climate Change Commission is NOW OPEN. Government agencies and offices, academic and research institutions, and other stakeholders are invited to nominate experts, professionals, and practitioners in any of the following fields of discipline as they relate to climate change: 1.    Natural sciences: Climate change science and meteorology, Earth science and oceanography, Natural science, Environment, biodiversity, and human ecology, Health, agriculture and food security, Water and hydrology, Climate change adaptation and mitigation, Disaster risk reduction and management, Renewable energy and sustainable energy, and Low emission infrastructure and transport; 2.    Social sciences: Sustainable development, Development planning and management, Sociology and anthropology, Geography, Political science, Demography and population studies, Development communication, and Ethnic studies, including gender policies; 3.    Law: Environmental law, International climate diplomacy and negotiations, and International law; 4.    Economics: Economics, Climate finance, Sustainable finance, Circular economy, Sustainable consumption and production, Ecological solid waste management, Sustainable delivery of goods and services, and Analysis of potential loss and damage and disruption of services from climate change risk or impacts; 5.    Data science: Mathematics, Climate change risk assessment, Climate change data ecosystem and analytics, Greenhouse gas inventory, and Climate change expenditure tagging;  6.    Governance: Implementation of policy frameworks and strategies, program and project management; National security administration; Policy research and development, Technology needs assessment; and Monitoring, evaluation and impact assessment of programs and projects related to climate change adaptation and mitigation and disaster risk reduction and management, with preference to those with relevant work in rural and coastal communities; and 7.    Priority thematic areas of the National Climate Change Action Plan and other technical areas relevant to the mandate and work of the CCC. The nominee must be:  - A Filipino citizen;  - With proven track record in his/her field of expertise;  - Has not committed plagiarism or has not been convicted of a crime of moral turpitude;  - Has no conflict of interest with the mandate of the CCC or NPTE, or shall endeavor to avoid any situation involving an actual conflict of interest, or the appearance of a conflict of interest;  - Has not taken any position against indigenous peoples; and - A reputed and recognized authority on climate change or any of the above specific fields of discipline, as they relate to climate science, public policy, or risk governance. Nominations must be in the form of a duly signed official letter addressed to the Climate Change Commission, accompanied by documents that attest to the qualifications and integrity of the nominee and received in complete form by the CCC on or before the specified deadline.  Any private sector nominating institution or entity must be duly registered within the Securities and Exchange Commission.  The deadline for submission of nomination letters is on 15 July 2021.   For inquiries, please contact the NPTE Secretariat at npte-sec@climate.gov.ph.
July 07, 2021 Wednesday
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Saving Indigenous Plants sa ika-52 na episode ng Seryeng ‘Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways’
MAYNILA, ika-6 ng Hulyo taong 2021 — Magtitipon-tipon virtually ang mga eksperto para pag-usapan at maisulong ang napakahalagang papel ng mga katutubong halaman sa pagpapahusay ng ating biodiversity at sa pag-adapt natin sa climate change sa ika-52 na episode ng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” na may temang, “Saving Indigenous Plants”   Ang online na talakayan, na hango sa konsepto ni Deputy Speaker at Antique Representative Loren Legarda, ay ipalalabas sa Huwebes, ika-8 ng Hulyo 2021, 10:00 AM gamit ang Facebook Live sa facebook.com/CCCPhl at facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Kabilang sa online na talakayan ay ang mga eksperto sa pangangalaga at pagpapalago ng mga katutubong halaman ng Pilipinas. Sila ay sina Architect Rey Solero ng Philippine Native Plants Conservation Society, Inc.; Ronald Achacoso, Curator ng Pinto Arboretum of Philippine Plants; Prof. Liezl M. Atienza, Registered Nutritionist-Dietician mula sa University of the Philippines Los Banos (UPLB); at Leo Fuentes ng Magsasaka at Siyentipiko para sa Pag-unlad ng Agrikultura sa Mindanao.   Ang Pilipinas ay tahanan ng ilang katutubong halaman na mayroong ecological, cultural, at economic value. Subalit, sa paglaganap ng mga exotic o bagong uri ng mga halaman at pananim ay nahalinhan at naisantabi ang mga katutubong halaman, at ito ay may epekto sa ating natural ecosystems.   Ang pag-iipon ng mga binhi o seeds para sa malawakang paggamit, pagtatanim ng katutubong mga gulay sa ating mga tahanan at community gardens, paggawa ng bagong mga recipes gamit ang mga katutubong tanim, at ang pagprotekta sa ating mga endangered na katutubong halaman at iba pa, ay makatutulong upang mapangalagaan natin ang ating biodiversity at habitat para sa susunod na mga henerasyon.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan at kamalayang pang-kapaligiran, naglalayon ang "Stories for a Better Normal" na baguhin ang kaisipan ng mga tao, mga pamilya, at mga pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga pamamaraan kung saan maaaring magkaroon tayo at maisasabuhay natin ang isang ‘better normal’ sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.   Na-organisa ang online na talakayang ito mula sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ng three-term na Senador at ngayo'y Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) na binigyang-suporta naman ng Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines at ng Mother Earth Foundation.
July 06, 2021 Tuesday
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Saving Indigenous Plants in 52nd episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 5 July 2021 — Plant experts will gather virtually to promote the critical role of indigenous plants in enhancing biodiversity and adapting to climate change on the 52nd episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic, “Saving Indigenous Plants.”   The program, conceptualized and hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 8 July 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are experts in the preservation, promotion, and propagation of Philippine indigenous plants including Architect Rey Solero of the Philippine Native Plants Conservation Society, Inc.; Ronald Achacoso, Curator of the Pinto Arboretum of Philippine Plants; Prof. Liezl M. Atienza, a Nutritionist-Dietician from the University of the Philippines – Los Banos (UPLB); and Leo Fuentes of the Magsasaka at Siyentipiko para sa Pag-unlad ng Agrikultura sa Mindanao.   The Philippines is home to several indigenous plants of ecological, cultural, and economic importance. However, the introduction and spread of new varieties of plants and crops have displaced indigenous plants, and the destruction of natural ecosystems due to human activities and climate-related disasters and stresses made growing habitats less favorable for indigenous species.   Savings seeds for widespread use, growing indigenous vegetables in home and community gardens, developing new recipes using edible indigenous plants, and protecting endangered native plants, among others, can help preserve biodiversity and habitats for the next generations of Filipinos.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
July 05, 2021 Monday
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CCC: Collaborative efforts are the key to driving sustainability in the food sector
MANILA, 5 July 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) throws support to the foodservice sector in transitioning into a low-carbon industry by advancing their capacities to adopt sustainable practices.   The Sustainable Summit 2021, organized by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) Philippines, gathered stakeholders to exhibit accomplishments aligned to the country's food sustainability priorities and agenda, and to have a discourse on policy and best practices for sustainable dining.   With the theme, “Final Course: Celebrating Sustainable Dining in the Philippines,” the Summit supports the efforts of the Philippine government to establish sustainable consumption and production (SCP) strategies in the country.   In his opening remarks, CCC Vice Chairperson Emmanuel M. de Guzman highlighted the contribution of food production systems in the present climate crisis, particularly of the agriculture sector which accounts for around 30% of greenhouse gas emissions.   “To fix hunger, we must rethink both how we consume, and how we produce what we consume. A combination of significant dietary changes, huge reductions in food losses and waste, and significant improvements in food production methods are required to make this transformation,” said de Guzman.   Vice Chairperson de Guzman proposed the following measures to attain sustainability in the food service sector:   Ramping up public consciousness about more readily available, accessible, and affordable food, while also increasing awareness about the damage that harmful and unsustainable meals bring; Increasing the diversity of nutrient-rich crops, rather than focusing on high volumes of a few crops; Utilizing technology and system innovation to cultivate existing land to get higher yields, sequester carbon, and conserve biodiversity and ecosystem services; and Reducing food loss and waste during the food manufacturing and consumption stages through technological solutions, consumer campaigns, and policies.   With food security as one of the thematic areas of the National Climate Change Action Plan, the CCC is committed to assist the food sector in transitioning into a low-carbon and sustainable industry by developing national and local policies to create an enabling environment for sustainable food value chains, and finding pathways to combine supply-side actions such as efficient production, transport, and processing with demand-side interventions such as modification of food choices, and reduction of food loss and waste.   This transformation is parallel with the country’s commitments under the first Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC) crafted and implemented through the convergence among national government agencies including the Department of Finance, National Economic and Development Authority, Department of Agriculture, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Department of Transportation, and Department of Energy, along with the academe and civil society. The DOF and CCC led the efforts to complete the technical process of the NDC.   “The CCC is serious about food sustainability. This entails seeing it not as a series of sectors and industries, and even the consuming public, battling it out for prevalence over the agenda, but as an intricate tapestry of stakeholders bound by a common vision: A healthier society, one where stomachs are filled, where farmlands brim with yield, where foresight and compassion reign, not only today, but for the generations to come,” de Guzman assured.   The Sustainable Diner Summit 2021 is held under the Sustainable Diner: A Key Ingredient for Sustainable Tourism Project. The Project produced studies and resources, such as a food waste management case study, a feasibility study on a food donation programme, a cost-benefit analysis on sustainable business approaches, a food service life-cycle assessment, eco-labeling criteria for the foodservice sector, and environmental teaching manuals for primary and secondary school teachers.   They are also working with the food service sector such as restaurants and hotels to offer sustainable dining options and improving their sustainability performance through local and sustainable food sourcing, food waste reduction, water and energy efficiency, avoidance of single-use plastics, plant-based dining options.   To know more about the highlights of the event, visit the Facebook Page of the WWF Philippines at https://www.facebook.com/WWF.Philippines.
July 05, 2021 Monday
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