Message on the International E-Waste Day
 
October 15, 2020 Thursday
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Waste to Wages in 22nd Episode of “Stories for a Better Normal” Series
MANILA, 14 October 2020 — For the 22nd episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic “Transforming Waste into Wages,” ecological solid waste management and recycling advocates will gather to share knowledge on the importance of the circular economy in minimizing waste, and promote sustainable consumption and production as part of the country’s  post-pandemic recovery.   The episode, hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 15 October 2020, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/conglorenlegarda.   Both advocates and entrepreneurs will join the online conversation, including Mr. Felicito “Chito” Valmocina, Chairman of Barangay Holy Spirit in Quezon City; Ms. Shine De Castro, co-founder of Old Manila Eco Market; Ms. Wilhelmina “Willie” Garcia, founder of Junk not!; and Katherine Mana-Galido, co-founder of Back to Basics Ecostore.   In previous episodes, the online series tackled food gardening, saving seeds, permaculture, good nutrition and diet, youth climate activism, sustainable urban mobility, planting native trees, practical sustainability, narrating risk to resilience stories through books, tree pest and disease management, Panay Island ecology, and the importance of reviving the weaving industry to teach citizens to be self-sustainable and self-sufficient.   This upcoming episode will feature local communities and social enterprises that implement ecological solid waste management and eco-friendly programs. These enterprises also generate livelihoods by reusing and upcycling manufactured products which promote sustainable and waste-free practices at home and in the community.   Episode 22 of “Stories for a Better Normal” series is also an opportunity to encourage Filipino households and local government units to reduce waste and properly implement R.A. 9003 or the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act in their respective communities in support of the government’s thrust of building a sustainable, resilient, and inclusive society during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 14, 2020 Wednesday
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Message on the Observance of World Rainforest Week
 
October 13, 2020 Tuesday
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CCC on World Rainforest Week: Sustainable Rainforest Management Key to Combat Climate Crisis
MANILA, 13 October 2020 — In observance of World Rainforest Week, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) called for the sustainable management of rainforests and stricter enforcement of environment-related laws to protect ecosystems and biodiversity and help address the impacts of climate change.   Celebrated from October 12th to 18th of every year, World Rainforest Week seeks to raise awareness and encourage action to protect the world’s rainforests. Given the rapid acceleration of climate change and human impacts, rainforests around the world are facing unprecedented threats towards biodiversity, carbon capture, and climate stabilization.   Home to over half of the world’s plant and animal species, our world’s rainforests absorb vast amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and provide the air we breathe, while also help curb global warming. Although rainforests take up only 6% of the Earth’s surface, within these are some of the most vital ecosystems on the planet.   Despite its critical importance for the survival of life on Earth, rainforests are among the most vulnerable ecosystems in the world. They continue to be endangered by unsustainable logging practices and rampant development and expansion of agribusiness and other industries. Cutting down forests releases carbon into the atmosphere and causes 15 percent of all human-induced carbon emissions.   The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) reported that deforestation and forest degradation continue to take place at alarming rates, which contributes significantly to the ongoing loss of biodiversity, with the area of primary forests worldwide decreased by over 80 million hectares since 1990.   In this regard, the CCC underscored the need for stronger leadership, sense of urgency, and commitment to a decisive multilateral response to swiftly save our deteriorating rainforests. The CCC also stressed the need to strictly enforce the Expanded National Integrated Protected Areas Systems Act, to provide support to forest rangers to facilitate the sustainable management of our remaining rainforests and fragile ecosystems, which will be key to combating climate change and contributing to the prosperity and well-being of present and future generations.   Through this observance, the Commission is also encouraging the public to be vigilant and take a more active role in protecting and preserving our forests to prevent the effects of climate change from worsening, avoid the emergence or reemergence of pandemics, and support the health of our ecosystems and the organisms therein.
October 13, 2020 Tuesday
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CCC on International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction: Unite behind science to reduce disaster risks
MANILA, 13 October 2020 — In observance today of the International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) cited the report entitled “Human Cost of Disasters: An overview of the last 20 years 2000-2019” published by the UN Office of Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR) and Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) which found that both the number of disaster events linked to natural hazards, and related economic losses had almost doubled from the previous period. From 2000 to 2019, 7,348 disaster events were recorded worldwide by EM-DAT leading to approximately US$2.97 trillion in economic losses, up from 4,212 disasters worldwide with economic losses totaling US$ 1.63 trillion for the period 1980 to 1999.   The Philippines was ranked fourth in terms of countries with the most number of disaster events (304 events), next only to China (577 events), the United States (467), and India (321) among the countries most affected globally.   The CCC urged government agencies, civil society, environment activists, and experts to anchor national and local climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction strategies and policies on science to effectively reduce levels of and avoid the creation of new risk of disasters.   Hazards are occurring physical phenomena caused by either the rapid or slow onset of events having atmospheric, geologic, and hydrologic origins on solar, global, regional, national or local scales. Disasters often follow natural hazards which can be associated with having insufficient capacity or measures to reduce the potentially negative consequences of the hazard.   The International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction was first declared in 1989, after a call by the United Nations General Assembly for a day to promote a global culture of risk-awareness and disaster reduction. Held every 13th of October, the day recognizes how people and communities around the world are reducing exposure to disasters, raising awareness about the importance of reining in these risks, and promoting the culture of becoming climate-friendly to reduce the chances of environmental disasters.   The event is also an opportunity to acknowledge the progress being made toward reducing disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods, and health in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 adopted at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Japan in March 2015.   The Sendai Framework has seven strategic targets and 38 indicators for measuring progress on reducing disaster risk and losses. These indicators align the implementation of the Sendai Framework with the implementation of the SDGs and the Paris Agreement on climate change.   In 2016, the UN Secretary-General launched “The Sendai Seven Campaign” to promote each of the seven targets over seven years. The target for the year 2020 is Target E which is “Substantially increase the number of countries with national and local disaster risk reduction strategies by 2020” which lays the foundation for the implementation of the Sendai Framework and is closely linked with Priority for Action 2: “Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk.”   The CCC said that this year’s target is about conveying the message that many disasters can be avoided or prevented if all of the local government units fully understand and appreciate the risk and vulnerability that prevails in their communities, and let science inform their local plans of action and ensure that investments build local resilience.   The Commission reiterated its call for the integration of the Sendai Framework in the local plans and programs for DRR to contribute to the achievement of not only target E, but of all the following seven global targets: (A) reduce disaster mortality; (B) reduce the number of affected people; (C) reduce direct economic loss in relation to global GDP; (D) reduce disaster damage to critical infrastructure and disruption of basic services; (E) increase the number of countries with national and local DRR strategies; (F) enhance international cooperation to developing countries; and (G) increase the availability of and access to multi-hazard early warning systems and DRR information assessments.   The climate body also said that engaging civil society, environment activists, and experts in policymaking processes, especially to understand autonomous adaptation and the interplay of informal and formal institutions play an important role in strengthening public decision-making.   As countries around the globe face economic setback from the COVID-19 pandemic, which has a direct relation to the disturbance and loss of ecosystems further exacerbated by the worsening climate, the CCC believes that climate-resilient and disaster-ready communities should be the top priority of governments worldwide to ensure that humankind will continue to survive and thrive.
October 13, 2020 Tuesday
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Decisive leadership, science-based disaster risk planning reduce impacts of climate change – Legarda
MANILA, 13 October 2020 — House Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda urged national and local government leaders to strengthen the country’s disaster risk reduction planning through science to reduce the irreversible impacts of climate change, in observance of the International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction.  “Our national and local leaders must implement an effective disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) scheme that requires action on several fronts such as good governance and institution building, social protection and anti-poverty effort, investment on augmented capacity and resilient infrastructure, and sustainable resource management,” said Legarda. According to the latest report from the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR) entitled, “Human Cost of Disasters: An overview of the last 20 years, 2000-2019,” climate change is largely to blame for a near doubling of disasters caused by natural hazards in the past 20 years.  The UNDRR report also identified 7,348 major disaster events that occurred between 2000 and 2019, claiming 1.23 million lives, affecting 4.2 billion people, and costing the global economy some US$2.97 trillion. The figure exceeds the 4,212 major disasters recorded between 1980 and 1999.  In the Report, UNDRR chief Mami Mizutori remarked: “It is baffling that we willingly and knowingly continue to sow the seeds of our own destruction, despite the science and evidence that we are turning our planet into an uninhabitable place for millions of people.” While the report focuses primarily on the staggering rise in climate-related disasters over the last 20 years, it is also backing the need to strengthen disaster risk governance for the entire range of both natural and human-induced hazards, including those related to environmental, technological, and biological hazards and risks. “In the short-term, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) through the implementation of Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act has succeeded in saving many lives through improved preparedness and the dedication of its staff. But the odds continue to be stacked against them in particular by the business-as-usual case scenarios that are failing miserably on reducing greenhouse gas emissions to levels commensurate with the desired goal of keeping global warming to 1.5˚C as set out in the Paris Agreement,” said Legarda. She further emphasized that lack of awareness and understanding of DRRM and climate change continue to put those vulnerable sectors into the brink of devastation. “It really is all about governance if we want to deliver this planet from the scourge of poverty, further loss of species and biodiversity, the explosion of urban risk and the worst consequences of global warming.  We must act collectively and educate people,” said Legarda. Highlighting the importance of science, Legarda shared action points from UNDRR that could be adopted by local and national leaders, including focused studies on disaster risk communication to help residents interpret warnings, and would aid in steering communication strategies in the most effective forms. Flood control was regarded as a development issue in addition to a humanitarian concern, with a recommendation that priority should be given to cost-effective measures in poor regions at high risk of recurrent flooding, together with malnutrition prevention programs. In addition, there are numerous proven life-saving measures for storm impacts, such as cyclone shelters, wind-resistant buildings, and preservation of protective ecosystems such as mangrove forests which also serve as carbon sinks, and coral reefs. Effective deployment of early warning systems supported by increasingly accurate weather forecasts have the potential to protect vulnerable populations worldwide and save thousands of lives. Standardized methodologies are needed to collect comprehensive national data on deaths from all-natural hazards; and better data collection would improve appreciation and understanding of disaster impacts and improve analyses. More in-depth data, such as disaster damage to buildings, disaggregated demographic and gender data, and impacts on local economies would help decision-makers prioritize and target new measures more effectively. This underlines the importance of a national disaster loss database which is vital to the development of national and local DRR strategies aligned with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030. “This year’s International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction is all about risk governance, so that everything we do during and after this Covid-19 pandemic will ultimately define our country’s readiness and responsiveness to the challenges of the new normal. The only way forward is to heed the science and make decisive actions toward staging a recovery that will pave the way for a better normal for the Filipino people,” Legarda concluded.
October 13, 2020 Tuesday
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Climate Vulnerable Forum Leaders Event Hosted by Prime Minister of Bangladesh
   
October 07, 2020 Wednesday
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CCC Launches ACT Local Online Conference
MANILA, 6 October 2020 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) has slated several sessions this October for the Accelerated Climate Action and Transformation (ACT) Local Online Conference, a four-part virtual discussion of the ACT Local Program to provide technical assistance to Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) on climate science, issues, vulnerabilities, and risks, as part of the agency’s Communities for Resilience (CORE): Convergence Initiative.   The ACT Local Online Conference will feature experts who will orient sixteen (16) participating HEIs on climate science; CORE Initiative; Rationalized Planning System and Enhanced Local Climate Change Action Plan (ELCCAP) development; Greenhouse Gas Inventory; Climate Change Expenditure Tagging; and accessing the People’s Survival Fund.   Participating HEIs have previously partnered with the CCC and expressed interest and support by providing technical assistance to their respective local government units (LGUs) on the development of risk-informed local plans, including the LCCAP. They are the following: Bulacan State University, Visayas State University, University of the Philippines Los Banos, Sulu State College, Palawan State University, Aklan State University, University of Antique, Northwestern Visayan Colleges, University of the Philippines Visayas Tacloban College, Eastern Visayas State University, Leyte Normal University, Philippine Science High School Eastern Visayas Campus, Palompon Institute of Technology, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), Mapua University, and Baliuag University.   The schedule of the ACT Local Online Conference will be held every Tuesday of October (October 6, 13, 20, and 27) at 10:00AM. In view of ensuring the Commission’s continuous program implementation and delivery of services in this pandemic, the sessions will be held via Zoom and will be streamed live on the Facebook page of the CCC.   The first session will feature discussions from the members of the CCC’s National Panel of Technical Experts, Dr. Carlos Primo C. David and Dr. Glenn Roy Paraso; as well as messages from Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman and House Deputy Speaker and Lone District of Antique Representative Loren Legarda.   The ACT Local Program aims to formalize a sustainable partnership between the national government, academe, and the private sector in providing technical and/or financial resources to LGUs on climate action.   Through ACT Local, relevant stakeholders will be capacitated to assist and contribute to efforts that will generate information, boost capacity development, promote cooperation and convergence, facilitate vertical and horizontal alignment for development planning, and access to climate financing windows toward climate resiliency.   The ACT Local Program will serve as the overarching partnership program of the Commission for the delivery of its CORE Orientation and Training Program through the established climate change consortiums.   For more information about the ACT Local Online Conference and ACT Local Program, visit the Facebook page of the Climate Change Commission at www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
October 06, 2020 Tuesday
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Help our artisans and weavers by supporting rural livelihoods – Filipino designers
MANILA, 6 October 2020 — Filipino fashion designers and entrepreneurs urged the public to patronize and support our innovating weaving and textile industry in this time of pandemic during the 20th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways.”   This episode is the second part of the topic “Weaving Resilience: Reviving Indigenous Textiles and Crafts” which highlighted collaborative efforts in utilizing local textiles from the rural weavers and promoted appreciation of indigenous weaving textiles from various regions in the Philippines.   The online conversation hosted by Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda featured designers and brand owners including Lenora Luisa Cabili of Filip+Inna; Marga Nograles of Kaayo Modern Mindanao; Nina Corpuz-Rodriguez of Nina Inabel; Looie Lobregat of Linea Etnika; Susan Marie Liao of Designs by Marie; Jor-el Espina; and Elsie Standen of Allena.   Legarda discussed the significance of reviving the production of Piña Seda, a handwoven fabric made of silk and pineapple fibers, and other traditional textiles.   “The strengthening of the local tropical fabrics industry is attuned to our advocacy of promoting sustainable development and preserving our rich heritage. With our efforts, we are able to help the local tropical fabric industry, we are able to help our rural artisans, and we are able to provide rural livelihoods," said Legarda.   Ms. Cabili shared the beginnings and products of Filip+Inna, and how they collaborate with different artisans around the country to banner their excellent craftsmanship. She also stressed the exquisite characteristics of piña.   “One of the beauties of the piña is that it is taken from its purest form. The way it is extracted, stripped, dried, knotted, and weaved is an amazing process that I don't see in other textiles around the world," said Cabili.   Ms. Nograles shared the story behind Kaayo Modern Mindanao and its partnership with the Indigenous Weaving Communities of Mindanao.   “People asked me what 'Kaayo' is. I would summarize it into three points: First, 'Kaayo' means kindness or goodness in Bisaya. We wanted everyone to be inspired by kindness. Next, 'Kaayo' is a curated collection of different Mindanaoan stories. So basically, we are a platform to present the treasures of my hometown [Davao]. And lastly, Kaayo Modern Mindanao is about coming together of everyone, of all Mindanaoans. Our brand celebrates collaboration and empowering other people to come together to bring the brand to life,” said Nograles.   Ms. Corpuz-Rodriguez shared how Nina Inabel helped the local weavers, dressmakers, and farmers in Ilocos, and how the brand promoted the many use of the Inabel fabric.   “As an Ilocana, I'm familiar with the fabric "Inabel." It is used all over the household - from curtains to blankets, and even uniforms and medals. But we showed everyone that the traditional fabric, "Inabel," ay hindi lang ginagamit sa bahay, kundi pang fashion din,” said Corpuz-Rodriguez.   Ms. Lobregat shared how she was inspired by their local cultural heritage to create products that make weaves mainstream and celebrate the stories of the hands and parts that make them – through Linea Etnika.   “Linea Etnika really embraces slow fashion. Things are purposely made to last. I know that Linea Etnika is a small company but I'd like to believe that we have a very big heart and strong conviction to make this happen. We go for zero waste, and we upcycled and repurposed some of our products,” said Lobregat.   Mr. Espina shared the background of his brand and how fascinated he was with the colorful handwoven fabrics of Iloilo, Aklan, and Antique.   “The designers and entrepreneurs are here to revive and give respect to these fabrics. We are free to create new things, we are free to do and work on different colors and patterns, but we have to respect the crafts of our ancestors so that our tradition will be preserved and continue,” said Espina. Ms. Liao shared the inspiration behind Designs by Marie, which came from their family’s love for arts, culture, and heritage that made them create a sustainable brand, especially in helping the artisans of Antique.   “It is a sustainable brand that has a tribute to our beloved province of Antique. We merge tradition with fashion. We aim to empower more Antiqueño artisans and continuously support their livelihood,” said Liao.   Ms. Standen shared Allena’s advocacy of protecting and preserving the past tradition which should be enjoyed and passed on as a legacy to the future generations.   “As a brand with responsibility, we know that consumers nowadays are getting smarter, so being "traceable" means we can answer their questions such "who made our clothes?," "what is it made of?," and "is it relevant that it can be passed on to their daughters?". Traceability, for us, has different ingredients: the people, the raw materials, and the research and development that comes with it,” said Standen.   As a textile art, culture, and heritage advocate, Legarda showed her extensive collection of local garments and Filipino knitwear made by the invited guest designers, in support of the rural artisans, weavers, and livelihoods.   “While this is about fashion, we talked about rural livelihoods, Philippine innovation and design. What we discussed is connecting businesses and enterprises in the cities to the mountains and the farmlands, and the need to connect artisans, livelihoods and weavers to the market,” Legarda concluded.   This three-part episode emphasizes the role of the traditional weaving industry in preserving our cultural heritage and local craftspersonship. The last part, which will focus on promoting traditional arts and crafts will air on October 8th.   The upcoming episode will feature founders of social and community-based enterprises including Karl Lozano of Sesotunawa; John Francia and Trish Lim of Woven crafts; and Nida Danao of Silnag.   Episode 21 will also show video clips of local artisans including weavers Angelina and Sammy Buhle from Hingyon, Ifugao; Teofilo Garcia, a Casque maker and Gawad Manlilikha ng Bayan from San Quintin, Abra; Eduardo Mutuc, a Metalsmith and Gawad Manlilikha ng Bayan from Apalit, Pampanga; and Magdalena Gamayo, a Textile weaver and Gawad Manlilikha ng Bayan from Pinili, Ilocos Norte.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, Stories for a Better Normal aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.             This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, and the Mother Earth Foundation.
October 06, 2020 Tuesday
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Message on World Habitat Day
October 05, 2020 Monday
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CCC on World Habitat Day: Enable Sustainable and Climate-Adaptive Systems for Housing Sector
MANILA, 5 October 2020 — In observance of the annual World Habitat Day, with this year’s theme “Housing For All: A Better Urban Future,” the Climate Change Commission (CCC) urged leaders from the public and private sectors to enable sustainable and climate-adaptive systems within the housing sector in order to improve shelter and other human settlement concerns within cities and communities.   Observed every first Monday of October, World Habitat Day focuses on the state of human settlements and on the basic right of all to adequate shelter. It focuses on improving all levels of partnership between government and relevant stakeholders in successfully implementing policies and methods to ensure adequate and affordable homes for all.   This observance recognizes the role of cities and local governments around the world in eliminating inequalities and poverty levels by providing access to basic amenities like shelter, food, and water for all, especially in this time of pandemic and climate crisis. Even before the pandemic began, however, there was already an estimated 1.8 billion people living in slums and informal settlements, inadequate housing or in homelessness in our cities worldwide, with around three billion people lacking basic handwashing facilities, according to the United Nations.   As cities prioritize COVID-19 response, the threat of typhoons, flooding, extreme heat, and spread of vector-borne diseases due to climate change remains. This risk is particularly worrying for the Philippines where populations and incidence of poverty are high. Adapting to climate change is thus an imperative for cities, home to half of the world’s population and where 80% of GDP is produced, according to the Global Commission on Adaptation.   The CCC highlighted ongoing work for the development of science-based climate risk management interventions for five cities under the Building Climate Resilient Urban Plans and Designs (BCRUPD) project with the Department of Human Settlements and Urban Development, League of Cities of the Philippines, UN Habitat, and other key partner agencies and organizations.   The CCC also committed to foster capacity building and knowledge exchange for green urban development, such as in its existing partnership with the National Housing Authority and the Philippine Green Building Council best practices on  sustainable building designs and standards, including renewable energy and energy efficiency, and build a sustainable technical support network for government agencies and relevant stakeholders for low-emission local development strategies.   In this World Habitat Day, let us all support efforts that would enable more sustainable and climate-adaptive cities and communities, to ensure a better life for all in an urbanizing world.
October 05, 2020 Monday
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CCC Launches ACT Local Online Conference
MANILA, 6 October 2020 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) has slated several sessions this October for the Accelerated Climate Action and Transformation (ACT) Local Online Conference, a four-part virtual discussion of the ACT Local Program to provide technical assistance to Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) on climate science, issues, vulnerabilities, and risks, as part of the agency’s Communities for Resilience (CORE): Convergence Initiative. The ACT Local Online Conference will feature experts who will orient sixteen (16) participating HEIs on climate science; CORE Initiative; Rationalized Planning System and Enhanced Local Climate Change Action Plan (ELCCAP) development; Greenhouse Gas Inventory; Climate Change Expenditure Tagging; and accessing the People’s Survival Fund. Participating HEIs have previously partnered with the CCC and expressed interest and support by providing technical assistance to their respective local government units (LGUs) on the development of risk-informed local plans, including the LCCAP. They are the following: Bulacan State University, Visayas State University, University of the Philippines Los Banos, Sulu State College, Palawan State University, Aklan State University, University of Antique, Northwestern Visayan Colleges, University of the Philippines Visayas Tacloban College, Eastern Visayas State University, Leyte Normal University, Philippine Science High School Eastern Visayas Campus, Palompon Institute of Technology, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), Mapua University, and Baliuag University. The schedule of the ACT Local Online Conference will be held every Tuesday of October (October 6, 13, 20, and 27) at 10:00AM. In view of ensuring the Commission’s continuous program implementation and delivery of services in this pandemic, the sessions will be held via Zoom and will be streamed live on the Facebook page of the CCC. The first session will feature discussions from the members of the CCC’s National Panel of Technical Experts, Dr. Carlos Primo C. David and Dr. Glenn Roy Paraso; as well as messages from Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman and House Deputy Speaker and Lone District of Antique Representative Loren Legarda. The ACT Local Program aims to formalize a sustainable partnership between the national government, academe, and the private sector in providing technical and/or financial resources to LGUs on climate action. Through ACT Local, relevant stakeholders will be capacitated to assist and contribute to efforts that will generate information, boost capacity development, promote cooperation and convergence, facilitate vertical and horizontal alignment for development planning, and access to climate financing windows toward climate resiliency. The ACT Local Program will serve as the overarching partnership program of the Commission for the delivery of its CORE Orientation and Training Program through the established climate change consortiums. For more information about the ACT Local Online Conference and ACT Local Program, visit the Facebook page of the Climate Change Commission at www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
October 05, 2020 Monday
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Legarda Calls for More Investments in Poverty Alleviation and Human Capital
MANILA 2 October 2020 – Citing recent studies on poverty, hunger alleviation, and human capital, House Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda called for more equalization of the budgets across departments in order to improve the welfare and capability of the Filipino people to cope with the challenges due to the pandemic and climate crisis.   Legarda said that a study by the Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS) released in August 2020 reported that with just a 10% decline in incomes, up to 5.5 million Filipinos would be pushed into poverty, adding that the pandemic is causing income dislocations larger than that.   The PIDS report emphasized however that the social amelioration program and the small business wage subsidy would reduce this number to 1.5 million, thereby saving four million Filipinos from poverty. “The proposed 2021 budget must therefore substantially increase the provisions for programs like these in the budgets of the DSWD, DA, DOLE, DTI, and other concerned agencies, to support our Filipino families and prevent them from falling below the poverty line,” Legarda said.   Legarda also cited the World Bank’s Human Capital Index 2020 Update, which gave the Philippines a 0.52 rating and made the dramatic conclusion that “children born in the country today will fail to achieve almost half their potential.” She also mentioned the Social Weather Stations also reported that 30.7% of respondents in a nationwide survey reported experiencing hunger once in the last three months.    “These reports show us that we need to stack the odds in favor of survival and human development.  If we aim to use the Build, Build, Build program to lift people out of poverty and reduce the incidence of hunger, the connections need to be made clear and certain.  Otherwise, we are not putting our money where our mouths are,” Legarda insisted.    Rather than make line item realignments, Legarda suggested taking a broader and more conservative look that assumes the worst and hopes for the best.      “The discrepancies are in the billions, with the DOH budget being reduced by P50 billion, while the DPWH gets a fresh P85 billion on top of their previous budget, which was already 25% higher than 2019.  I believe though that infrastructure development creates job opportunities and must trickle down to the poorest.  No less than an overhaul and a better spread among the agencies to ensure sufficient funding for human capital will work,” she said.   Lastly, Legarda cited the Global Commission on Adaptation (GCA) Flagship report, which stated that climate change could push more than 100 million people within developing countries below poverty line by 2030. She therefore called for increasing the budget provisions for climate adaptation projects and programs by government agencies, emphasizing the need to empower local governments and communities in managing climate risks and hazards.   “It is not enough that we plan just to recover from this pandemic. We must acknowledge that even when this pandemic is all over, we still have a climate crisis to deal with. The President himself said that our response to the climate crisis should be just as urgent. Let’s invest in where it truly matters so our development gains won’t be wasted come another typhoon or drought. Let’s strive for a better normal by enabling genuine and lasting resilience for all,” Legarda concluded.  
October 02, 2020 Friday
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Support and patronize local and indigenous textile weaving industry – textile experts
MANILA, 29 September 2020 — Indigenous textile experts shared knowledge on culture-based livelihoods such as traditional weaving and crafts during the 19th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic “Weaving Resilience: Reviving Indigenous Textiles and Crafts.”   The first of this three-part episode which focused on promoting indigenous textiles and crafts also highlighted the impacts of COVID-19 on the indigenous weaving and crafts industry and ways to enhance its resilience.    The online conversation, hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, featured  Dr. Norma Respicio, Philippine textile expert, University of the Philippines (UP) Professor Emeritus; and Ms. Rhoda Pon-an, Executive Director of the Antique Development Foundation.   Dr. Respicio discussed the indigenous weaving traditions and local community craftsmanship from different areas in the Philippines, and shared the issues and problems for the Philippine textile industry and the tasks that need to be done in promoting and preserving traditional weaving and crafts.   “Let us include art technology in school curricula probably at Junior High School para mas maintindihan at ma-appreciate nila what they are learning. Also, set up community museums, and research and documentation centers, which can be run by the locals themselves so that they would appreciate more what they have," said Dr. Respicio.   Ms. Pon-an introduced the work of Antique Development Foundation, showed various indigenous textiles and craft industries in Antique. She also shared ways on how everyone could support the Antique indigenous weaving industry.   “Gamit ang mga indigenous materials ng Antique tulad ng abaca, nito at pinya, ang mga weavers ay binigyan ng sapat na kaalaman para ang kanilang mga produkto ay maging maganda at mabili sa merkado. Ang iba't ibang bayan ay may sariling produkto tulad ng buri weaving, patadyong, abaca, nito, hand embroidery, banig, bariw, piña at bamboo panel production,” said Pon-an.   Legarda highlighted the need to implement Republic Act No. 9242 or the Philippine Tropical Fabric Law which she authored, prescribing the use of Philippine tropical fabrics for official uniforms of government officials and employees and for the purposes which require the use of fabrics in government offices and functions.   Legarda also showed various weaving centers in Antique and fairs and exhibitions which showcase the indigenous weaving and crafts industry, such as the National Arts and Crafts Fair, Hibla ng Lahing Filipino Travelling Exhibition, and Harvest Fair in Antique.   Legarda also introduced traditional weavers from different regions in the country and the struggles they face due to the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.   “Tulungan natin ang ating mga micro-entreprises, tulungan natin ang ating mga weavers sa iba't ibang mga probinsya, at tulungan natin ang lahat ng mga maliliit na negosyo para magkaroon sila ng kabuhayan during this pandemic and the days and months ahead,” Legarda concluded.   This three-part episode emphasizes the role of the traditional weaving industry in preserving our cultural heritage and local craftspersonship. The second part, which will air on October 1st, will feature Filipino designers supporting local weavers, and the third part, set on October 8, will focus on promoting traditional crafts.    Len Cabili, Designer of Filip+Inna; Marga Nograles, Designer of Kaayo Modern Mindanao; Niña Corpuz-Rodriguez, Owner of Nina Inabel; Looie Lobregat, Founder of Linea Etnika; Susan Marie Liao, Designer of Designs by Marie; Jor-El Espina, Owner of Jor-El Espina Atelier; and Elsie Standen, Creative Director of Allena will join the upcoming episode.    As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, Stories for a Better Normal aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.             This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, and the Mother Earth Foundation.
September 29, 2020 Tuesday
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CCC Joins Youth’s Call for Climate Justice on Global Climate Action Day
The Youth Strike 4 Climate Philippines visited and met with Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman of the Climate Change Commission last September 18, 2019 and presented their National Youth Demands in preparation for the 2019 Global Climate Strike. The visit was part of the CCC's commitment to actively collaborate with the youth in addressing the climate crisis. MANILA, 28 September 2020 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) joins our young Filipino climate advocates in calling for urgent and bolder actions towards climate justice in observance of the Global Day of Climate Action on September 25. The Global Day of Climate Action is a worldwide youth-led movement for climate awareness and justice conducted at the time that the United Nations’ General Assembly also takes place. This year’s assembly is virtual due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In the Philippines, Filipino youth organizations focused on the theme “Para Sa Klimabukasan,” staging innovative climate strikes and movements online. This year’s mobilization recognized the youth who stood by the environment and vulnerable and marginalized communities, as well as honored fallen medical and environmental frontliners who courageously fought COVID-19 and the climate crisis. The climate body supported the Filipino youth’s call for urgent and decisive climate action from all nations, especially those who are historically responsible to the climate crisis, in order to uphold climate justice, implement environmental and natural resource conservation policies, support the ambition to create a circular economy in cities and communities, and promote youth participation in policymaking processes. The Commission expressed that it remains committed to advancing climate action and sustaining the fight for the 1.5 warming threshold by ensuring that these will be incorporated in the development of policies and implementation of plans to uphold the country’s best interests in the context of climate justice. Moreover, the agency encourages national and local leaders, academe, private sector, and civil society to continue empowering the youth in all aspects of climate action by supporting their initiatives, hearing their voices, and working with them towards a more sustainable and resilient future for all.
September 28, 2020 Monday
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Message on the World Environmental Health Day
 
September 26, 2020 Saturday
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At the ASEAN-COP26 Climate Dialogue held September 24 and 25, 2020
The Philippines, represented by the Climate Change Commission (CCC), expressed its commitment to submit its Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC) before the year ends, despite the challenges in light of the COVID-19 pandemic at the ASEAN-COP26 Dialogue 2020.  CCC Commissioner Rachel Herrera stated that the Philippine NDC will convey more realistic yet ambitious mitigation targets, alongside the country’s adaptation priorities. She also called for greater synergy within the region in raising ambition, especially in the implementation of the ASEAN countries’ NDCs to help achieve the global goal of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius, as prescribed in the Paris Agreement,  taking into account the needs of vulnerable people, places and ecosystems. CCC Policy Chief Jerome Ilagan meanwhile emphasized that the existing policies, plans, and roadmaps of the Philippines will support the development of long-term strategies on low emission and sustainable development. The ASEAN-COP26 Climate Dialogue serves a platform for senior government officials from ASEAN Member-States (AMS) to share their experiences in meeting and enhancing their climate pledges under the Paris Agreement through NDC enhancement and implementation.  The dialogue also provides an opportunity for AMS to exchange lessons on developing long term climate strategies (LTS), as well as promote cross-regional discussion on driving and building momentum for climate action in the lead up to COP26 and in exploring strategies for economic recovery from COVID19 within the region.
September 26, 2020 Saturday
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Message on the Global Day of Climate Action
September 25, 2020 Friday
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CCC Honors Envi Health Practitioners, Calls for Better Support for Climate, Envi Programs
MANILA, 25 September 2020 — In celebration of the World Environmental Health Day tomorrow, the Climate Change Commission paid tribute to the country’s environmental health practitioners (EHPs), workers, and advocates, and called for stronger support for climate and environmental programs, especially in this time of pandemic and climate emergency.   Celebrated every September 26th of each year, the World Environmental Health Day aims to underscore the impacts of environmental risks and hazards on public health and wellness.   The observance is also in line with the Philippine Development Plan (PDP), which seeks to raise public consciousness on the relationship of health and the environment and promote activities that ensure accountability on health and environmental integrity.   According to the World Health Organization (WHO), nearly one in four deaths across the globe are due to environmental factors. Every year, an estimated 12.6 million people die as a result of living or working in an unhealthy environment. Environmental risk factors, such as air, water, and soil pollution, chemical exposures, ultraviolet radiation, and climate change contribute to more than 100 diseases and injuries.   The CCC noted that the outbreak of COVID-19 disease caused serious devastation, loss of life, and economic hardship to people all over the world. At the same time, it has brought us to a turning point, of recognizing the greater value of biodiversity conservation and planetary health for sustainable development.   In this World Environmental Health Day, as we exert all efforts to address the COVID-19 pandemic and the climate crisis, may we also continue taking better decisions and actions that would nurture and protect the delicate balance between humanity and the environment and planet we live in.
September 25, 2020 Friday
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STATEMENT OF THE CLIMATE CHANGE COMMISSION ON THE PRESIDENT’S PRONOUNCEMENT ON CLIMATE CHANGE AT THE 75th UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY
President Rodrigo Roa Duterte virtually addresses the general debate of the 75th session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), on September 22, 2020, in New York. This is the first time that President Duterte addressed the UNGA and has called on the parties of the Paris Agreement to exhibit urgency in fighting climate change.  Before fellow world leaders at the 75th United Nations General Assembly, President Rodrigo Roa Duterte called for all to act on the climate crisis with urgency as one united community under the Paris Agreement. The President stated: “The same urgency needed to fight COVID-19 is needed to address the climate crisis. This is a global challenge that has worsened existing inequalities and vulnerabilities from within and between nations. Climate change has worsened the ravages of the pandemic. Peoples in developing countries like the Philippines suffer the most. We cannot afford to suffer more. The Philippines joined the Paris Agreement to fight climate change. We call on all parties, especially those who have not made good their commitment to fight climate change, to honor the same. We call on all parties to strengthen communities and peoples for preparedness and resilience. We are talking about mankind and Earth, our one and only home.” To this end, we underscore the need for climate action to shape our recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. Global and national economic stimulus packages must channel massive investments in renewable energy, sustainable mobility and transportation systems, ecosystems-based adaptation measures, and green and climate-resilient infrastructure. Keeping to the commitments in the Paris Agreement will allow the world to keep global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. The 1.5°C temperature goal is a threshold of chance and hope for developing countries like the Philippines. If we breach it, we lose countless lives and bring immeasurable suffering, especially to the poor and vulnerable. Honoring the 1.5°C goal is to raise global ambition and accelerate action that would enable better support to build resilience for developing countries. It is to bring climate justice to the fore.  We call on our leaders to heed science and let it inform the country’s national and local development plans to ensure strong risk governance and sustainable development at all levels. This must go hand-in-hand with the full implementation of our environmental and climate change laws. We urge our policymakers to create an enabling environment that would decouple economic growth from the endless extraction and misuse of natural resources, including the development of policies that will drive innovations in energy, transportation, and manufacturing systems. Lastly, we call for greater cooperation and action on the finalization of the country’s First Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC). The sooner we submit our NDC, the sooner we can unlock new sources of climate finance that will enable us to advance rapidly the implementation of climate change adaptation and mitigation programs in our communities. May the President’s leadership resolve inspire all of us to increase the intensity and depth, and the breadth and impact, of our climate actions to make our development sustainable and our societies resilient.
September 24, 2020 Thursday
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