CCC lauds mandatory bike lanes in all new roads, calls for sustainable and equitable mobility systems for cleaner air
MANILA, 10 November 2020 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) called for the development and implementation of functional and sustainable urban mobility plans in observance of Philippine Clean Air Month.   Presidential Proclamation No. 1109, s. 1997 declares the month of November of every year as “Clean Air Month Through National Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance Consciousness.” Consistent with the Republic Act No. 8749 or the Philippine Clean Air Act of 1999, the observance aims to create awareness and to encourage the motoring public to take positive steps to help improve air quality.   A report from the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air (CREA) and Greenpeace Philippines laid down recommendations to reduce air pollution post-COVID-19 in order to safeguard people’s health and ensure a better normal.   According to the report, vehicles are a major source of air pollution, accounting for 65% of air pollution in the country, primarily in Metro Manila. Air pollution is also expected to increase given the projected 4.6% annual growth rate in energy demand. This is consistent with the projected increase of road vehicles to 24.8 million by 2030, compared to a baseline of 6.6 million in 2010.   As a measure to greatly improve mobility in cities is a key solution to the problem, the Department of Public Works and Highways has issued Department Administrative Order No. 88, s. 2020.  This is seen as a transformational shift in infrastructure planning and design towards a climate-friendly mass public transport system and an effective investment to enable shared mobility, walking, and cycling, as the report recommends.   The CCC echoes these recommendations by encouraging cities and citizens to adopt greener modes of transportation to commute in this period of pandemic and climate crisis, and promoting inclusive urban mobility solutions as part of the country’s post-pandemic recovery.   The imposed community quarantine across the country had already given us a glimpse of what cities can be like with vastly improved air quality. But months later, with the easing of regulations and the return of motor vehicles on the road, air pollution is gradually making a comeback.   With this, the agency also urges local government units themselves to establish dedicated, protected, and connected bike lanes with green spaces to link cities as well as nearby provinces and encourage more Filipinos to choose healthier and sustainable ways to commute.   The CCC believes that having access to these safe and functional types of mobility systems and non-motorized mainstream modes of transportation will open doors for effective air quality, climate, and environment management which will benefit the present and the future generations. 
November 10, 2020 Tuesday
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Reduce food waste, embrace slow food movement in support of sustainable consumption and production
MANILA, 9 November 2020 — Slow food enthusiasts underscored the importance of food waste reduction and management during the 25th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” with the topic “Waste Not, Want Not: A Food Waste Episode with Slow Food Manila.”   The online conversation hosted by Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda featured restaurateurs including Chef Kalel Demetrio, co-owner of Agimat Foraging Bar and Kitchen; Chef Waya Wijangco, owner of Gourmet Gypsy Art Café; and Chef Robby Goco, owner of Cyma Restaurants, who shared how they implement sustainable consumption and production in their restaurants and highlighted the importance of managing food waste.   Chef Demetrio, known as a “Liquid Maestro”, introduced the basics of foraging, as a way of processing indigenous ingredients into food, drinks, or condiments. He works with the local farmers, and uses low-technology and indigenous knowledge to make products from the unusual and rare fruits and vegetables so it will not be wasted.   “Back in the days kasi, everything is foraging. There are no groceries and fast food chains, so we tend to create everything on our own. In the modern times, we see the beauty of foraging kasi nakikita natin na it is unadulterated and all ingredients can be found in nature. Alam mo ‘yong quality kasi ikaw mismo ang nagtanim... unlike getting something from the grocery, it is an endgame na kaagad kasi it is already a by-product,” said Demetrio.   Chef Wijangco, a staunch advocate for inclusive employment, small enterprise, and support for local farmers,environmental conservation, tourism development, and education, shared how Gourmet Gypsy Art Café applied the rules of Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle into the daily food preparation and other processes in their restaurant.   “Sustainability is a way of life. It requires mindfulness, consideration for others, the environment we live in, and the communities we interact with. It takes a lot of work and commitment, but it is the kind of effort that truly makes our world a better place to live in,” said Wijangco.   Chef Goco, fascinated by creating something out of nothing, has been innovating by using the entire animal kingdom, or ingredients from nose to tail and from roots to seeds, to make dishes for his restaurants. He explained the basics of menu costing and their back of house control points. He showed some dishes made from unused parts of meat and vegetables. He also demonstrated how to make tomato paste from overripe tomatoes, which are usually thrown away.   "As a chef owning 12 restaurants, ang pinaka importante sa lahat is when I go to the restaurant, I check the garbage kung ano ang laman, kasi pag may nakita akong produkto na hindi dapat nasa basurahan, I call the manager and tell them, "why are you not efficiently using your ingredients?" Because my secret is, if I know at the end of the evening na malinis ang basurahan ko, then I know my business is profitable dahil hindi ako nagtatapon," said Goco.   Legarda, as an advocate of slow food and circular economy, showed several photos of the foods she prepared from the ingredients taken from her own home garden.   “We promote the concept of sustainability in our lives so that we can use our natural resources in a way that it is not wasted, or depleted. In this way, we teach ourselves to live properly and with respect for our nature,” said Legarda.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
November 09, 2020 Monday
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Message on the observance of National Environmental Awareness Month
 
November 04, 2020 Wednesday
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Effective food waste management in the 25th Episode of “Stories for a Better Normal” Series
MANILA, 03 November 2020 — Slow food enthusiasts will gather virtually to underscore the importance of food, and its waste reduction and management, on the 25th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” with the topic “Waste Not, Want Not: A Food Waste Episode with Slow Food Manila.” The episode, hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 05 November 2020, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/conglorenlegarda.   Chefs and restaurant owners will join the online conversation, including Kalel Demetrio, co-owner of Agimat Foraging Bar and Kitchen; Chef Waya Wijangco, owner of Gourmet Gypsy Art Café; and Chef Robby Goco, owner of Cyma Restaurants.   According to the World Wildlife Fund-Philippines, Filipinos waste about 308,000 tons of rice every year. In Metro Manila alone, an estimated 2,175 tons of food scraps end up in trash bins on a daily basis. Much of this wasted food come from restaurants.   In previous episodes, the online series tackled food gardening and saving seeds, permaculture, good nutrition and diet, youth climate activism, planting native trees, practical sustainability, narrating risk to resilience stories through books, tree pest and disease management, Panay Island ecology, reviving indigenous textiles and crafts, transforming waste into wages, and sustainable urban mobility.   This upcoming episode will feature restaurateurs who will share their knowledge on the adverse effects of food wastage and how their respective restaurants effectively manage their food waste in support of sustainable consumption and production.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
November 03, 2020 Tuesday
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Message on the observance of World Cities Day
October 31, 2020 Saturday
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Support traditional culture, sustainable livelihoods of IP communities
MANILA, 30 October 2020 — Representatives from indigenous peoples (IP) groups featured their unique ways of preserving culture and heritage and called for more support to enhance their resilience to the pandemic and climate impacts, during the 24th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways.”   The online conversation hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda featured indigenous and cultural advocates, including Waway L. Saway, member of the Talaandig in Bukidnon and Head of the Family Food Security Cycle program of Hineleban Foundation; Delia Pauden, Cluster Head of Ati in Antique and Aklan; and Renee Talavera, Head of the Cultural Communities and Traditional Arts of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA).   Dedicated in celebration of the National Indigenous Peoples’ Month this October and the 23rd anniversary of the passage of the Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA) of 1997, the episode aimed to raise awareness on the interventions needed from all sectors to further promote traditional culture and rural livelihoods of IP groups and communities.   Mr. Saway, an international-renowned artist for music and arts, introduced the Hineleban Foundation, which aims to secure Mindanao’s sources of water by reforesting the buffer zones surrounding the high mountain ranges and to provide sustainable livelihood options for the Bangsamoro and IPs of Mindanao. Rooted in the belief that neither the forest nor the people can thrive without the other, the foundation approaches its goal in three aspects—food security, sustainable livelihood, and reforestation. He also discussed how the various groups in Bukidnon and other areas in Mindanao converge to do sustainable rainforestation work, especially during this pandemic.   “Simula lamang ito dito sa Bukidnon, subalit ito ay gagawin natin sa buong Mindanao dahil ang Hineleban ay one of the key players of Mindanao rainforestation. Ibig sabihin nito, buong Mindanao ang ating ginagalawan, kasama na rito ang mga pamayanan ng mga kapatid nating Muslim,” said Saway.   Ms. Pauden, member of the Pandan-Ati organization that teaches dance, music, weaving and Ati language to the young members of Ati, shared how the government helped them in preserving their traditional culture and sustain their livelihoods,.   “Sa ngayon, unti-unti nang nawawala ‘yung tradisyon namin. But through Deputy Speaker Legarda and NCCA’s support, we’re praying and hoping na makatulong na maibalik ‘yung kultura at tradisyon namin,” said Pauden.   Ms. Talavera introduced the programs and projects for the IPs, such as Assistance to Artisans Program and School of Living Traditions (SLTs) to revitalize IP culture and heritage. SLTs are non-formal centers of learning in the communities where cultural masters transmit their knowledge and skills on a particular art, craft, and tradition to the young members of the community for their appreciation and learning.   “Ang SLTs, five years na nitong natutulungan ang communities hanggang sa maging sustainable na ang mga ito. Ganu’n din sa Assistance to Artisans, ang mga natulungan nito ay malaki ang pasasalamat dahil nari-reach natin kahit ‘yung mga nasa pinaka-liblib na lugar kung saan meron pala silang mga pangangailangan na hindi kaagad nila mailapit dahil mahirap ang sitwasyon. Dahil dito sa Assistance to Artisans program, maraming mga tao at mga komunidad ang napasaya, lalo na ngayong panahon ng pandemic, hindi tumigil ang ating mga programa at tuloy-tuloy pa rin tayo,” said Talavera.   Legarda showed several photos of her programs, activities, and projects for the IPs whom she considers as frontliners in the preservation of indigenous culture. She also reiterated the need to preserve the cultural wealth and heritage bestowed upon by the IP communities and their indigenous knowledge, systems, and practices. She also stressed the need to ensure that budgets allocated for IPs are properly utilized and spent to further protect their rights.   “There should be adequate safety protocols and support mechanisms in place for our IPs, the NCCA, and the NGOs we work with in the preservation of our indigenous culture and heritage. We also need to ensure that the budgets intended to support our IPs are used fully and efficiently. We should always respect the culture of our IPs. Huwag tayong gagamit ng kanilang kaalaman nang hindi nire-respeto ang kanilang karapatan, kultura, at kabuhayan,” Legarda concluded.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 30, 2020 Friday
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Suportahan ang Tradisyonal na Kultura, Sustenableng Kabuhayan sa Komunidad ng mga Katutubo   
MAYNILA, Ika-30 ng Oktubre taong 2020 — Nagpakita ng kanilang mga kakaibang pamamaraan sa pangangalaga ng kultura at pamanang yaman ang ilang kinatawan mula sa ating ating mga katutubo o Indigenous People (IP). Nananawagan sila ng karagdagang suporta para tuluyang mapabuti ang kanilang katatagan sa pandemya at epekto ng klima sa ika-24 na kabanata ng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways.”   Ang lingguhang online talakayan na pinangungunahan ni House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda ay dinaluhan ng mga tagapagtaguyod at tagapagsulong ng mga katutubo at kultura. Nandoon sina Waway L. Saway, miyembro ng tribong Talaandig ng Bukidnon at Pinuno ng Food Security Cycle Program ng Hineleban Foundation; si Delia Pauden, Cluster Head ng mga Tribong Ati ng Antique at Aklan; at si Renee Talavera, Pinuno ng Cultural Communities at Traditional Arts ng National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA).   Itinuon ang usapan sa pagdiriwang ng  National Indigenous Peoples’ Month ngayong Oktubre at sa ika-23 na anibersaryo ng pagkakapasa ng Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA) noong 1997. Ang special episode na ito ay naglalayong maiangat ang kamalayan sa mga dapat gawin ng iba’t ibang sektor ng lipunan para itaguyod ang tradisyunal na kultura at kabuhayan ng mga katutubo at ang kani-kanilang komunidad.     Si Waway, isang international-renowned artist sa musika at sining, ang siyang nagpakilala sa Hineleban Foundation. Ang Hineleban ay isang organisasyon na naglalayong masiguro ang pinagkukunang tubig sa sa Mindanao sa pamamagitan ng reforestation ng buffer zones na nakapalibot sa matataas at bulubunduking bahagi ng lugar para makapagbigay ng iba pang sustenableng pagkakakitaan sa Bangsamoro at iba pang mga katutubo. Batay sa paniniwalang maging ang gubat o ang tao man ay hindi kayang umusad at mabuhay nang nag-iisa, nakatuon ang layunin ng Hineleban Foundation sa tatlong aspeto – kasiguruhan sa pagkain, pagpapanatili ng kabuhayan at pagtatanim ng puno. Tinalakay din ni Waway kung paano nagkakaisang gumawa ang iba’t ibang grupo sa Bukidnon at ibang lugar sa Mindanao para magkaroon ng “sustainable rainforestation” lalung-lalo na ngayong may pandemya.   “Simula lamang ito dito sa Bukidnon, subalit ito ay gagawin natin sa buong Mindanao dahil ang Hineleban ay one of the key players of Mindanao rainforestation. Ibig sabihin nito, buong Mindanao ang ating ginagalawan, kasama na rito ang mga pamayanan ng mga kapatid nating Muslim,” dagdag ni Waway.   Si Delia Pauden, miyembro ng organisasyong Pandan-Ati na nagtuturo ng sayaw, musika, paghahabi at wikang Ati sa mga kabataang miyembro, ay nagbahagi kung paano sila tinulungan ng pamahalaan sa pangangalaga ng kanilang tradisyunal na kultura at pagpapanatili ng kabuhayan.   “Sa ngayon, unti-unti nang nawawala ‘yung tradisyon namin, ngunit sa pamamagitan ni Deputy Speaker Legarda at suporta ng  NCCA, nananalangin at umaasa kami na matulungang maibalik ang mga ito,” sabi ni Delia.   Mula sa National Commission for Culture and the Arts, ipinakilala ni Renee Talavera ang mga programa at proyekto para sa IPs tulad ng Assistance to Artisans Program at School of Living Traditions (SLTs) para buhaying muli ang katutubong kultura at pamanang yaman. Ang SLTs ay “non-formal centers of learning” sa mga pamayanan kung saan ibinabahagi ng cultural masters sa mga bata ang kanilang kaalaman at kakayahan sa partikular na art, craft at tradition para payamanin ang kanilang kaalaman at pagpapahalaga sa mga ito.   “Ang SLTs, five years na nitong natutulungan ang communities hanggang sa maging sustainable na ang mga ito. Ganu’n din sa Assistance to Artisans, ang mga natulungan nito ay malaki ang pasasalamat dahil nari-reach natin kahit ‘yung mga nasa pinakaliblib na lugar kung saan mayroon pala silang mga pangangailangan na hindi kaagad nila mailapit dahil mahirap ang sitwasyon. Dahil sa Assistance to Artisans program, maraming mga tao at mga komunidad ang napasaya, lalo na ngayong panahon ng pandemic. Hindi tumigil ang ating mga programa at tuloy-tuloy pa rin tayo,” paliwanag ni Renee.   Ipinakita naman ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda ang ilang mga larawan ng kanyang mga programa, gawain at proyekto para sa ating mga katutubo na itinuturing niya bilang frontliners sa pangangalaga ng katutubong kultura. Iginiit ng Congresswoman na kailangang pangalagaan ang kanilang katutubong kaalaman, sistema at kasanayan. Binigyang-diin niya na kailangang siguruhin na ang budget na inilaan para sa IPs ay nagagamit nang tama at ginagastos para mapalawig at maprotektahan ang kanilang mga karapatan.   “Kailangang magkaroon tayo ng sapat na safety protocols at support mechanisms para sa mga katutubo, ang NCCA at ang NGOs na katulong natin para alagaan ang ating katutubong kultura at pamanang yaman. Kailangan din nating masiguro na ang mga budget na inilalaan para suportahan mga katutubo ay nagagamit nang buo at nagagastos nang mahusay. Kailangan din nating irespeto ang kultura ng IPs. Huwag tayong gagamit ng kanilang kaalaman nang hindi nirerespeto ang kanilang karapatan, kultura at kabuhayan,” pagtatapos ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda.   Bilang isang online discussion na nagtataguyod sa kalusugan, kamalayan sa kapaligiran, at gawaing angkop sa klima,  ang “Stories for a Better Normal” ay naglalayong baguhin ang kaisipan ng mamamayan, mga pamilya at mga komunidad sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga pamamaraan kung paano magkakaroon at maipatutupad ang isang 'better normal' sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.    Ang online discussion na ito ay inorganisa mula sa pakikipagtulungan ng Tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) na sinusuportahan ng Institute for Climate at Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, at ng Mother Earth Foundation.
October 30, 2020 Friday
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Risk Management, Climate Tagging, Emissions Inventory Vital Components of Local Climate Planning – CCC
MANILA, 29 October 2020 — In the third session of the “Accelerated Climate Action and Transformation (ACT) Local Online Conference,” the Climate Change Commission (CCC) stressed the importance of climate risk management, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory, and climate budget tagging as critical components of local climate planning and action.   A four-part online webinar series organized by the CCC, the ACT Local Conference aims to capacitate higher education institutions (HEIs) from across the Philippine regions to provide technical assistance on climate science, issues, vulnerabilities, and risks to their respective local government units (LGUs) and communities, with the view of developming science-based and risk-informed local climate plans.   The HEIs who participated in the webinar are the following: Aklan State University, Ateneo de Davao – Law, Bulacan State University, Holy Name University, Iloilo Science and Technology University, Laguna State Polytechnic University, Leyte Normal University, Mariano Marcos State University, Mindanao State University- College of Forestry and Environment, Rizal Memorial Colleges – School of Law Davao, Southern Philippines Agribusiness and Marine and Aquatic School of Technology, St. Michael’s College- Laguna, Sultan Kudarat State University, University of Antique, University of the Philippines Visayas, and West Visayas State University.   CCC Assistant Secretary Romell Antonio O. Cuenca recognized the role of HEIs in building the capacities of our LGUs, particularly in providing assistance in crafting science-based and risk-informed Local Climate Change Action Plans (LCCAPs).   “Through today’s session, we hope to provide a strategy for you and your respective LGUs to develop a basis for climate mitigation efforts through the greenhouse gas inventory, and through the CCET presentation, and of course, discuss how the national and local government can work together to ensure we have sufficient funding for necessary climate actions,” said Cuenca.   Ms. Elaine Joyce V. Borejon of the CCC’s Policy Research and Development Division discussed the National Climate Risk Management Framework (NCRMF), a policy initiative of the CCC that envisions a climate action planning system that is anchored on a unified and integrated science and risk-based approach through the presence of a strong risk database, information, and analytics system accessible at the national and subnational levels.   “We really look forward to enjoining you in [the NCRMF] process. Higher education institutions are very crucial in this, so we want sustained partnerships [with you] towards our country’s transformation,” said Borejon.   Mr. Francisco S. Dacumos III of the CCC’s Implementation Oversight Division discussed how LGUs could account and monitor their GHG emissions and climate-related expenditures.   A GHG inventory is an estimate of all emissions and removals of GHG from given sources and sinks within a defined spatial and temporal dimensions, while the CCET mandates government agencies to track their climate change expenditures in their respective budget submissions using a common framework jointly issued by the CCC and the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) to monitor the implementation of the NCCAP at the community level.   “GHG inventory aids in identifying source sectors and activities contributing to GHG emissions, as well as understanding trends in emissions and removals alike. It serves several purposes in terms of policymaking, and strategic and investment planning, as it provides scientific bases upon which emissions reduction strategies and policies shall be constructed. The CCET meanwhile provides information on which sectors national and local governments focus their resources on, and what general or specific actions they are undertaking. Through this, financing gaps and deficient sectors which require attention in terms of financing and urgency are identified,” said Dacumos.   The ACT Local Online Conference aims to formalize a sustainable partnership between the national government, academe, and the private sector in providing technical and/or financial resources to LGUs on climate action. Through this, relevant stakeholders will be capacitated to assist and contribute to efforts that will generate information, boost capacity development, promote cooperation and convergence, facilitate vertical and horizontal alignment for development planning, and access to climate financing windows towards climate resiliency.   The last leg of the online webinar, airing on October 27th, will focus on the process of accessing the People’s Survival Fund (PSF) and developing PSF proposals.   Interested participants may register through this link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/accelerated-climate-action-transformation-for-local-communities-act-local-tickets-121024931829?aff=PARTICIPANTS   For more information about the ACT Local Online Conference and ACT Local Program, visit the Facebook page of the Climate Change Commission at www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
October 29, 2020 Thursday
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CCC mentors HEIs on accessing, developing People’s Survival Fund proposals
MANILA, 29 October 2020 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) delivered a mentoring session to capacitate higher education institutions (HEIs) on how to tap and access the People’s Survival Fund, the country’s climate adaptation fund which provides long-stream finance for adaptation projects aimed at increasing the resiliency of communities and ecosystems to climate change. This was during the fourth and last session of the Accelerated Climate Action and Transformation (ACT) Local Online Conference held yesterday via Zoom and Facebook Live.   The ACT Local Conference, a four-part online webinar organized by the CCC, orients HEIs from the various regions in the Philippines to provide technical assistance on climate science, issues, vulnerabilities, and risks to their respective LGUs and communities on the development of science-based and risk-informed local climate plans.   Participating HEIs are the following: Aklan State University, Bohol Island State University, Holy Name University, Ifugao State University, Iloilo Science and Technology University, Laguna State Polytechnic University, Leyte Normal University, Mariano Marcos State University, Mindanao State University – Lanao del Norte Agricultural College, Philippine Science High School – Eastern Visayas Campus, Southern Philippines Agribusiness and Marine and Aquatic School of Technology, St. Michael’s College- Laguna, Sultan Kudarat State University, University of Antique Main Campus, Mapua University, University of Antique – Hamtic Campus, University of the Philippines Visayas, University of the Philippines – Diliman – SURP, and West Visayas State University.   Members of the CCC’s People’s Survival Fund Unit led the webinar, including Mr. John Ernest M. Mateo and Ms. Jean Paula Regulano, who presented information on the process and requirements for accessing funding, constraints in terms of technical capacity to develop climate change adaptation projects, and the need for collaboration with community stakeholders.   The People’s Survival Fund or PSF is a national climate adaptation grant mechanism created by Republic Act No. 10174 which amended the Climate Change Act of 2009. The fund shall be used to support adaptation activities of local governments and communities. This includes adaptation activities in the areas of water resources management, land management, agriculture and fisheries, health, infrastructure development, and natural ecosystems including mountainous and coastal ecosystems.   Mr. Mateo discussed the process of accessing the PSF, which includes the prioritization criteria for local communities, reminders, and considerations for submitting adaptation projects/proposals, and ways to access the Project Development Grant. He presented the six (6) approved projects of the PSF.   “We emphasize that the role of Higher Education Institutions are significant in engaging more local government units and local community organizations in accessing the PSF. We in the Climate Change Commission are striving to harmonize all these sectors together in order to achieve our common agenda to further implement more PSF projects along the way,” said Mateo.   Ms. Regulano discussed the cycle of developing project proposals for the PSF, including tools to provide a basis for comparing and prioritizing adaptation measures, and guidelines in filling out the PSF project proposal template. She noted that there are several programs and projects that provide technical assistance to access the PSF.   “The challenge for the past years was the capacity of local government units to fill up the PSF Proposal Project Template, with lesser revisions or comments pagdating sa review and evaluation stage. So as a response, we have programs to provide assistance to local government units and other eligible proponents,” said Regulano.   Through his closing remarks, the chairperson of the House Committee on Climate Change and Bohol 1st District Representative Edgar M. Chatto encouraged participating HEIs to unite and act urgently to address the changing climate.   “We are in a state of climate emergency. It is imperative that we take immediate action aggressively and decisively, otherwise, the human race faces extinction. Let us heed the warnings in the world. There is no planet B. It is important to act now – act locally because it makes a lot of difference,” said Cong. Chatto.   With limitations on face-to-face training and meetings, the CCC continues to provide capacity building for local government units (LGU) and other stakeholders on PSF through its eLearning Program.   The PSF e-learning aims to strengthen our technical support and peer-to-peer learning services to the LGUs as well as networking with SUCs and HEIs to train and mentor more LGUs in developing quality and responsive PSF project proposals. To date, CCC’s PSF Unit is now mentoring the third batch of enrollees which started last August and will run until the end of this month.   The ACT Local Online Conference aims to formalize a sustainable partnership between the national government, academe, and the private sector in providing technical and/or financial resources to LGUs on climate action.   Through ACT Local, relevant stakeholders will be capacitated to assist and contribute to efforts that will generate information, boost capacity development, promote cooperation and convergence, facilitate vertical and horizontal alignment for development planning, and access to climate financing windows toward climate resiliency.
October 29, 2020 Thursday
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Celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Month in 24th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 28 October 2020 — Representatives from Indigenous Peoples (IP) communities will gather virtually to discuss the role of environmental sustainability in enhancing resilience to future shocks on the 24th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” dedicated to celebrate the Indigenous Peoples’ Month.   The episode, hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 29 October 2020, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/conglorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are: Waway L. Saway, member of Talaandig in Bukidnon and Head of the Family Food Security Cycle program of Hineleban Foundation; and Delia Pauden, Cluster head of Ati in Antique and Aklan.   In previous episodes, the online series tackled food gardening and saving seeds, permaculture, good nutrition and diet, planting native trees, practical sustainability, narrating risk to resilience stories through books, tree pest and disease management, reviving indigenous textiles and crafts, transforming waste into wages, and championing sustainable urban mobility.   This upcoming episode will be an avenue to raise awareness on  interventions needed from all sectors to safeguard our vulnerable rural livelihoods, including culture-based livelihoods of our IPs.   By virtue of Presidential Proclamation No. 1906 signed in 2009, the month of October was declared as National Indigenous Peoples’ Month in the Philippines to put preferential attention on the importance of recognizing and protecting the rights of indigenous cultural communities geared towards national unity and development. This year also commemorates the 23rd year of Republic Act No. 8371, or the Indigenous Peoples' Rights Act (IPRA) of 1997.   The number of IPs in the Philippines remains unknown, but it estimated to be between 10% to 20% of the 110 million national population. Mostly subsistence farmers, herders, fishers, and hunters, the IPs have millennia of collective knowledge about the ecology of the surroundings.   This upcoming episode will bring focus to the cultural wealth and heritage of indigenous Filipinos and the need to preserve indigenous knowledge, systems, and practices.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 28, 2020 Wednesday
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Message on the National Indigenous Peoples' Month
October 26, 2020 Monday
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Legarda, Global Center on Adaptation Shore Up Climate Resilience, Adaptation in COVID-19 Recovery Efforts
MANILA, 24 OCTOBER 2020 — House Deputy Speaker and Antique Congresswoman Loren Legarda welcomed the leadership of the Global Center on Adaptation (GCA) in keeping the momentum for adaptation and building resilience despite the pandemic and expressed that COVID-19 recovery packages must be climate adaptive and pegged on achieving the 1.5 degrees Celsius climate goal enshrined in the Paris Agreement, during the GCA’s 2nd Board Meeting held virtually on October 23.   The GCA acts as a solutions broker, bringing together governments, the private sector, civil society, intergovernmental bodies, and knowledge institutions that can address the obstacles slowing down adaptation action. Legarda sits as Member of the GCA Board, which is chaired by former United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon with co-chair Mr. Feike Sijbesma, Honorary Chairman of Royal DSM.   “I would like to commend the anticipatory stance of the GCA on responding to one of the most pressing challenges of our time—recovering and rebuilding lives and economies post pandemic. The action tracks set by the GCA complement the priorities we see across countries, especially for developing nations and particularly for poor and vulnerable communities, who are hardest hit by the pandemic and the resulting economic shocks,” Legarda said, as she addressed the meeting chaired by Mr. Ban and moderated by Prof. Patrick Verkooijen, CEO of the GCA.   “Our interventions in the GCA should also continue urging world leaders and governments to ensure that economic stimulus packages must be climate-adaptive and transformative towards a world of  1.5 degrees Celsius, as enshrined in the Paris Agreement. COVID-19 recovery must be climate adaptation,” Legarda added.   Deputy Speaker Legarda during the Launch of the Global Commission on Adaptation (GCA) last October 16, 2018 in The Hague, Netherlands.   Legarda said that the GCA’s focus on Africa, as the most vulnerable continent, is an obvious priority to bolster food security and rural well-being, water for growth and resilience, and adaptation support to its fast-developing urban centers. She added that the “the template for Africa can be the template for the Philippines as well,” expressing that the GCA could support and extend to other parts of the developing world as well, especially those that are recognized to have climate risks and other socioeconomic vulnerabilities, particularly in the Asia Pacific region.   Legarda also emphasized the value of convergence, climate science, and finance in mainstreaming adaptation into country programs, adding that a South-South Center in the Philippines will be established through the efforts of the Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF) and the Climate Change Commission (CCC).   “Convergence of the public, private sectors and the academe and a whole of nation approach is much needed. I think everything that we must do must be based on science and research. As parliamentarians, we also have to ensure that the whole national budget is a budget geared towards adaptation. The GCA can work towards the influencing or mainstreaming of adaptation in country processes in the aspects of water security, sanitation, education, infrastructure, and other focus areas of the GCA,” Legarda expressed.   Aside from Legarda, other GCA Board members and advisers in attendance included: Dr. Akinwumi Adesina, President of the African Development Bank; Mr. Dag-Inge Ulstein, Minister of International Development of Norway; Mr. Peter Eriksson, Minister for International Development Cooperation of Sweden; Mr. Abul Kalam Abdul Momen, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Bangladesh; Mr. Abul Kalam Azad, Special Envoy for the United Nations CVF Presidency; Mr. Huang Runqui, Minister of Ecology and Environment of the People’s Republic of China; Mr. José Antonio Meade, Secretary of Finance and Public Credit of Mexico; Mr. Roald Lapperre, Vice Minister for the Environment, Netherlands Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management; Mr. Vijay Rangarajan, Director-General of the Americas and Overseas Territories of the United Kingdom; Mr. Rémy Rioux, CEO of the Agence Française de Développement (AFD); President Ali Bongo Ondimba of Gabon (represented by Gabon’s Forests, Oceans, Environment and Climate Change Minister Lee White); Miami, Florida Mayor and President of the U.S. Conference of Mayors in 2020, Mr. Francis Suarez; Mr. Rodger Voorhies of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Mr. Tao Zhang, Deputy Managing Director at the People's Bank of China (PBOC) and International Monetary Fund (IMF) Executive Director for China; Mr. Axel van Trotsenburg, World Bank Managing Director of Operations; Ms. Bernice Van Bronkhorst, Global Director of the Climate Change, Sustainable Development Practice Group of World Bank; Mr. Jamal Saghir, Director of the Sustainable Development Department for the Africa Region at the World Bank; Mr. Brooks Preston, Managing Director of the Macquarie Group; and Ms. Mathilda Buijtendijk, GCA Director of Operations.
October 24, 2020 Saturday
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CVF Parliament Leaders support the call for greater ambition ahead of NDC Midnight Deadline
MANILA, 23 October 2020 — Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF) parliamentarian leaders are united in calling for more ambitious commitments ahead of the December 31 Midnight Deadline for nations to submit their updated Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).  CVF parliamentarians led by House Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda; Speaker of the People’s Majlis of Maldives, H.E. Mohamed Nasheed; and President of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) and Chair of Parliamentary Standing Committee on the Ministry of Environment Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) of Bangladesh, Saber Chowdhury, convened yesterday in a meeting chaired by the CVF Presidency of Bangladesh Special Envoy, Abul Kalam Azad.  Also in attendance were Designated National Focal Points of the CVF Presidency of Bangladesh, Additional Secretary MoEFCC Shamim Razi, Director-General Nazrul Islam of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs; and Chair of the CVF Expert Advisory Group Dr. Saleemul Huq. The meeting aimed to define efforts to accelerate formation of a supportive financing and regulatory environment to deliver a “Climate Prosperity” agenda from the CVF, and for policy de-risking for climate action. The launch of a South-South CVF parliamentary collaboration program which aims to enable parliamentarians from across the 48 CVF member-states to share valuable experiences and good practices on laws and policies in support of ambitious and urgent climate action to safeguard communities and progress towards the CVF’s “maximal resilience”, 100% renewable energy, and other goals, was also discussed. The CVF also endeavors to secure greater commitments to action by bringing CVF parliamentarians worldwide together with the IPU, to open the possibility of having a beneficial collaboration with parliaments from non-CVF countries. Deputy Speaker Legarda, the CVF Ambassador for Parliaments, lauded the initiative of Hon. Chowdhury for taking on the “ambition” task with CVF in 2020, and stressed the importance of the upcoming CVF-IPU collaboration in advancing the voices of the vulnerable nations and in pushing for the submission of enhanced NDCs before the year ends. The Philippines early on communicated that it will submit its updated NDC alongside the country’s adaptation priorities. The process is facilitated by the Climate Change Commission, with active support from other government agencies and civil society. Legarda also supported the creation of Climate Prosperity Plans to mobilize finance across a range of sources for CVF/V20 infrastructure and economic programs, to promote both robust socioeconomic progress and emissions reduction while building greater climate and disaster resilience.  She also emphasized that the CVF member-countries should share their respective enacted “best” laws which could also be adopted in other jurisdictions to increase ambition, promote tools and knowledge for adaptation, and increase the flow of international finance for climate action. The Climate Vulnerable Forum is an international partnership of 48 developing nations most threatened by the global climate emergency. The current president of the CVF is Bangladesh, which took over from the Marshall Islands this year and will hold the presidency until 2022.   The CVF countries are Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Barbados, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Colombia, Comoros, Costa Rica, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Fiji, The Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kenya, Kiribati, Lebanon, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mongolia, Morocco, Nepal, Niger, Palau, Palestine, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Samoa, Senegal, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tanzania, Timor-Leste, Tunisia, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, and Yemen.
October 23, 2020 Friday
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Make cities environmentally-sustainable through comprehensive urban mobility programs
In support of an eco-friendly and sustainable urban mobility in their city, Pasig City launched an interest-free bike loan program for their employees in the city government. Photos from the Pasig Transport Facebook Page. MANILA, 23 October 2020 — Mayors of bike-friendly cities and sustainable mobility advocates presented their best practices, programs, and strategies for green and inclusive urban mobility solutions during the 23rd episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” with the topic “Championing Sustainable Urban Mobility.”       The online conversation hosted by Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda featured local chief executives of Pasig City Mayor Vico Sotto and San Juan City Mayor Francis Zamora; with Mr. Chito Bauzon, Assistant Vice President of SM Supermalls. Mr. Red Constantino, Executive Director of the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, co-anchored the show. In celebration of World Cities Day on the 31st of October, the episode featured Metro Manila cities’ strategies in providing the great majority of the population access to active mobility and non-motorized modes of transportation that are not only safe and functional, but are also efficient and environmentally-sustainable. “Mobility is something that our working people really need. Ultimately, what is good for our working households is good for the climate. The approach is if we pay attention to development, then the climate benefits as well,” said Red Constantino. Mayor Sotto shared that Pasig City is developing a system of sustainable mobility by establishing permanent protected and pop-up bike lanes and widening of sidewalks. He also mentioned that they have a bike loan program for frontliners and city employees as their way to address mobility challenges amidst the pandemic. As individuals, Mayor Sotto also stressed the importance of demanding more from the government to ensure a better normal. “We can engage our government, let’s demand for better public transportation. Let’s demand to lessen the allocation of the road networks for private vehicles, and make it a more equitable system for everyone. Let’s demand these things and engage the government, the groups, and show that together, we can make this new normal a better normal for everyone,” said Sotto. Mayor Zamora highlighted that championing the environment is one of the key points in the 10-point agenda of ‘Makabagong San Juan’. He also discussed San Juan city’s policies and programs, such as Bicycle Ordinance 2020, separate lanes for bicycles and motorcycles, police bike patrols, solar pit stops for bike repair, the bike-sharing program for employees, public transportation modernization, and the goal of building a solar-powered city. “There was a time before when people didn’t really care too much about the environment, pero ngayon, nagbago na rin naman ang perspective ng ating mga mamamayan, at lahat naman po ay nag-aalaga sa ating kalikasan. Marami kaming ordinansa which we have passed and we are implementing with regard to the maintenance of cleanliness in our city,” said Zamora. Mr. Bauzon shared SM Supermalls’ advocacy of creating bike-friendly communities to support the bike-riding public and to contribute to the creation of sustainable cities and in the reduction of pollution. “Paniniwala po namin, it has to be a holistic approach, hindi lang natatapos ‘yan that we provided bike lanes and facilities, kundi, ano [pa] ‘yung pwede naming maitulong to encourage the public or the people to have a behavioral change, a mindset that supports the need for creating bike-friendly communities,” said Bauzon. Legarda reiterated that the advocacy of making cities bike-friendly should be expanded, with the help of LGUs implementing programs from the ground, in addition to the strict implementation of ecological solid waste management. “We must expand the convergence of eco-friendly practices, not just planting native trees but also the implementation of ecological solid waste management because bike lanes and the environment around bikers is so important,” Legarda concluded. As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, Stories for a Better Normal aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.      This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, and the Mother Earth Foundation.
October 23, 2020 Friday
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Gawing Environmentally-Sustainable ang mga Lungsod sa Pamamagitan ng Malawakang Urban Mobility Programs 
MAYNILA, Ika-23 ng Oktubre taong 2020 – Naglahad ang dalawa sa mga Alkalde ng Metro Manila ng kanilang programa tungkol sa magaan na paglalakbay ng tao sa kanilang nasasakupan. Ang magandang proyektong ito ay nakaangkla sa tinatawag na “urban mobility solutions” na ibinahagi sa Episode 23 ng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways," na may temang "Championing Sustainable Urban Mobility."    Ang online talakayan na pinangunahan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda bilang host at Red Constantino, Executive Director ng Institute for Climate at Sustainable Cities, bilang co-host, ay dinaluhan nina Mayor Vico Sotto ng Pasig City at Mayor Francis Zamora ng San Juan City. Mula sa pribadong sektor, nandoon din si Chito Bauzon, Assistant Vice President ng SM Supermalls.  Sa pagdiriwang ng World Cities Day sa ika-31 ng Oktubre, ibinahagi ng episode na ito ang magagandang pamamaraan at diskarteng ginagawa ng mga lungsod para makapagbigay sa tao ng daan sa aktibong paggalaw at paggamit ng sasakyang hindi de-motor pero ligtas, gumagana nang maayos at nakabubuti sa kapaligiran.      “Ang mobility o kalayaan sa paglakbay-kilos ay isang bagay na talagang kailangan ng mga tao, hindi lang para para sa mga siyudad. Kung ano ang maganda para sa mamamayan ay makabubuti rin para sa ating klima. Kung pagtutuunang-pansin natin ang pag-unlad, makikinabang din ang pagbuti ng klima," ayon kay Red Constantino.   Sa Pasig City, ibinahagi ni Mayor Sotto ang pagsasagawa ng isang sistemang makatutulong sa “sustainable mobility” sa pamamagitan ng pagpapatayo ng “pemanent protected and pop-up bike lanes” at pagpapaluwag ng mga bangketa. Binanggit niya na mayroon din silang bike loan program para sa frontliners at mga empleyado ng lungsod. Ang mga pagsisikap na ito ay paraan para matugunan ang mga problema sa pagkilos at paggalaw ng tao. Binigyang-diin ni Mayor Sotto na mahalaga ang paghingi ng tulong sa gobyerno para masiguro ang tinatawag na “better normal”.     "Maaari tayong makipag ugnay-tulungan kasama ang pamahalaan, humiling at pilitin nating magkaroon tayo ng mas mahusay na pampublikong transportasyon. Hingin nating mabawasan ang alokasyon ng road networks para sa mga pribadong sasakyan at gawin itong isang mas pantay na sistema para sa lahat. Hingin natin ang lahat ng mga bagay na ito para mahikayat ang gobyerno, mga grupo, at maipakita natin na kung tayo ay sama-sama, magagawa nating better normal ang new normal para sa lahat," diin ni Mayor Vico Sotto.    Sa Juan City naman, sinabi ni Mayor Francis Zamora na ang pagtatanggol niya sa kalikasan ay isa sa mga “key points” ng kanyang 10-point agenda para sa pagsusulong ng isang 'Makabagong San Juan'. Tinalakay ng Alkalde ang mga patakaran at mga programa ng lungsod tulad ng Bicycle Ordinance 2020, hiwalay na daan para sa bisikleta at motorsiklo, police bike patrols, solar pit stops para sa pagkumpuni ng mga bisikleta, bike-sharing para sa mga empleyado ng lungsod, modernisasyon ng pampublikong sasakyan, at ang layuning makapagpatayo ng isang solar-powered na siyudad.      "Mayroong mga pagkakataon noon na walang pakialam ang mga tao sa gobyerno, sa kapaligiran, pero ngayon, nagbago na ang perspective ng ating mga mamamayan, at lahat naman po ay nag-aalaga sa ating kalikasan. Marami kaming naipasang ordinansa na siya ring ipinatutupad sa pagpapanatili ng kalinisan sa ating lungsod," dagdag ni Mayor Francis Zamora   Maganda rin ang ang ibinahagi ni Chito Bauzon, Assistant Vice President ng SM Supermalls. Inisa-isa nito ang mga layunin at adhikain ng SM Supermalls na magkaroon ng bike-friendly communities para suportahan ang mga mahihilig magbisikleta, makapag-ambag sa pagkakaroon ng sustenableng mga lungsod at makatulong sa pagbabawas ng polusyon.    "Paniniwala po namin, kailangan ng malawak na pagtingin, hindi lang natatapos ‘yan sa paglalaan namin ng bike lanes at mga pasilidad, kundi, ano [pa] 'yung puwede naming maitulong para mahikayat ang publiko o mga tao na magkaroon ng pagbabago ng ugali, magkaroon ng kaisipan na sumusuporta sa pangangailangan na makagawa tayo ng bike-friendly communities,” sabi ni Chito Bauzon.    Ayon naman kay Deputy Speaker Legarda, ang adhikaing gawing bike-friendly ang mga lungsod ay kinakailangan pang palawakin sa tulong ng mga LGUs na nagpapatupad ng mga programa, kasama ang mahigpit na pagpapatupad ng ecological solid waste management.    "Kailangan nating palawakin ang pagsasama-sama ng mga ginagawa tungkol sa ikagaganda ng kalikasan, hindi lang pagtatanim ng puno kundi pati na rin ang pagpapatupad ng ecological solid waste management, dahil ang bike lanes at ang paligid na iniikutan ng bikers ay importante," pagtatapos ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda.   Bilang isang online discussion na nagtataguyod sa kalusugan, kamalayan sa kapaligiran, at gawaing angkop sa klima,  ang “Stories for a Better Normal” ay naglalayong baguhin ang kaisipan ng mamamayan, mga pamilya at mga komunidad sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga pamamaraan kung paano magkakaroon at maipatutupad ang isang 'better normal' sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.    Ang online discussion na ito ay inorganisa mula sa pakikipagtulungan ng Tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) na sinusuportahan ng Institute for Climate at Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, at ng Mother Earth Foundation.
October 23, 2020 Friday
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Bike-friendly cities and establishments to be featured in 23rd Episode of “Stories for a Better Normal” Series
MANILA, 21 October 2020 — Mayors of bike-friendly cities and sustainable mobility advocates will gather virtually to underscore the need for green and inclusive urban mobility solutions as part of the country’s post-pandemic recovery, on the 23rd episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic “Championing Sustainable Urban Mobility.”             Viewers can look forward to hearing straight from Pasig City Mayor Vico Sotto and San Juan City Mayor Francis Zamora about their cities’ urban mobility programs. Joining the conversation are Chito Bauzon, Assistant Vice President of SM Supermalls and Red Constantino of the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities.   The episode, hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 22 October 2020, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/conglorenlegarda. In previous episodes, the online series tackled food gardening and saving seeds, permaculture, good nutrition and diet, planting native trees, practical sustainability, narrating risk to resilience stories through books, tree pest and disease management, reviving indigenous textiles and crafts and transforming waste into wages.   This upcoming episode will feature Metro Manila cities’ strategies in providing the great majority of the population access to active mobility and non-motorized mainstream modes of transportation that are not only safe and functional, but also efficient and environmentally-sustainable.   According to a COVID-19 Community Mobility Report, the movement of people nationwide within public transit hubs, such as the Manila Metro Rail Transit and the Light Rail Transit stations, or bus and jeepney terminals, declined by as much as 85 percent in late April 2020. The latest report dated September 8 showed a 57 percent decline in transit station mobility nationwide, with a 67 percent decline in Metro Manila alone, compared to the end of July figures. The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) counted over 100,000 cyclists traversing six (6) major intersections on EDSA last June, with an average of 4,000 cyclists every day. During a previous episode on sustainable urban mobility, the MMDA supported Legarda’s recommendation to have a bike masterplan in Metro Manila, including the establishment of dedicated, protected, and connected bike lanes, as part of the “Better Normal for the Workplace, Communities and Public Spaces Act of 2020” (House Bill 6864 or Better Normal Bill), which she authored and sponsored in Congress. The episode will air in celebration of World Cities Day on the 31st of October, which aims to promote cooperation toward meeting opportunities and addressing challenges of urbanization, and contributing to sustainable urban development around the world. As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 21, 2020 Wednesday
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Sustainable Consumption, Circular Economy Should be Part of Better Normal
Among the livelihood programs of the Barangay Holy Spirit in Quezon City is the production of materials made from plastic wastes and other recyclables. Photo from the presentation of Brgy. Holy Spirit Councilor Joemar Lagarto.   MANILA, 19 October 2020 — Ecological solid waste management and recycling advocates echoed the importance of incorporating the concepts of circular economy and sustainable consumption and production in the country’s post-COVID-19 recovery plans during the 22nd episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic “Transforming Waste into Wages.” The online conversation hosted by Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda featured advocates and entrepreneurs, including Mr. Joemar Lagarto, Councilor from Barangay Holy Spirit in Quezon City; Ms. Shine De Castro, co-founder of Old Manila Eco Market; Ms. Wilhelmina “Willie” Garcia, founder of Junk not!; and Ms. Katherine Mana-Galido, co-founder of Back to Basics Ecostore, who all shared their experiences in starting eco-friendly programs that now generate livelihoods in their communities. Councilor Lagarto shared Barangay Holy Spirit’s journey and legacy of a solid waste management program since 1997, three years before the enactment of the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act, and how they established their gulayan sa barangay in 1998. With a model urban farm, training, and livelihood center that produces bags, home and office decorations, and storage baskets made from recyclable materials, Barangay Holy Spirit earned the Hall of Fame Awardee of the Seal of Housekeeping for Barangay Governance from the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG). “Nung nagsara ang Payatas dahil nagkaroon tayo ng shortage kung saan itatapon ang basura nung bago pa gumuho ito, naisip na namin noon na bakit hindi natin pag-aralan at turuan ang mga tao na dalawa lang ang dapat sine-segregate – ‘yung nabubulok at ‘di nabubulok na basura. [Naisip namin na] siguro mababawasan din ‘yung maitatapon sa Payatas kung ire-recycle natin at pagkakakitaan ng mga tao ang ating mga patapon na mga bagay. Maganda pala na magkaroon tayo ng training sa mga tao, turuan sila para i-recycle ang isang bagay na walang bayad o libre. Ang lahat ng nagawa nila, pwede nilang ibenta at pagkakitaan," said Lagarto. Ms. De Castro showed how they conceptualized, organized, and established an eco-friendly market, which offers naturally-made, handmade, and upcycled products, including those from regions and indigenous communities. She also discussed the challenges and opportunities they are facing during the pandemic. “Ang aming pangarap ay magkaroon ang lahat ng siyudad ng ganitong klaseng weekend market dahil kaya naman pong gawin, and at the same time, i-extend sa komunidad ang pagtulong, hindi lang sa local MSMEs. I-involve rin po ang buong community pati ang mga residente,” said de Castro. Ms. Garcia, an environmentalist and interior designer by profession, shared her experiences in producing furniture and accessories made of trash, which she successfully exhibited in Europe. She also shared how she was inspired by the Ecological Solid Waste Management (ESWM) Act and committed to influence young people to earn from waste. “Tinuturo ko sa community [kung papaano ang] proper waste management. All the plastic wastes that they collected, may tinuro akong technique sa kanila how to manually make it into rope. Nung nalaman nila ‘yun, nag-set-up kami ng Materials Recovery Facility to properly segregate all their household wastes. Eventually, hindi na rin nila nagamit, kasi household pa lang, nagse-segregate na sila, binebenta na nila ‘yung mga recyclable, tapos ‘yung residual wastes, ‘yung plastic, ‘yun naman ‘yung binibili ko sa kanila sa community, and we turn it into home furnishing. Then may program kami na you have to buy back the finished product out of your wastes,” said Garcia. Ms. Galido, a Climate Reality Leader and a human and environmental rights advocate, shared how she transformed climate campaigning into action with her back-to-basic (BTB) eco-store, stressing that a refilling system for stores should be part of the better normal. “Kami ay pare-parehong mga nababahala sa sobrang packaging kaya maliban sa pagdadala ng reusable bottles at pag-iwas sa straw, gusto namin na sa tahanan namin ay zero-waste at walang packaging. Doon po nagsimula na gusto namin ng pagbabago, back-to-basics ang aming tindahan, kami ay nagpapahalaga sa essentials, at kung anong mahalaga sa pamilya. Zero-waste journey ang gusto naming maibahagi, para mabago ang throwaway culture,” said Galido. Legarda encouraged households and LGUs to reduce waste by properly implementing segregation of waste at source, and encouraging individuals in their respective communities to recycle, upcycle, and plant their own food in support of the government’s thrust of building a sustainable, resilient, and inclusive society during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. "Isinulong natin ang Ecological Solid Waste Management Act dahil naniniwala ako na kaya ng ating mga barangay ang mag-segregate, recycle, at upcycle ng mga basura. Maraming sa ating mga LGUs ang hindi pa rin sinusunod ang batas, ngunit nakita naman natin ngayon na mas dumarami pa ang nagsasabuhay nito sa ating komunidad at maging sa sariling bahay. Naniniwala ako na kayang-kaya natin ang zero-waste lifestyle at circular economy bilang bahagi ng ating better normal,” Legarda concluded. As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, Stories for a Better Normal aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.             This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, and the Mother Earth Foundation.
October 19, 2020 Monday
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CCC on World Food Day: Improve food systems to build back better
MANILA, 16 October 2020 — In celebration of World Food Day, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) reiterates the call to improve food systems by adopting innovative solutions make it more resistant to economic shocks brought by the COVID-19 pandemic.                                                                         World Food Day (WFD), celebrated every year around the world on 16 October in honor of the date of the founding of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in 1945, tackles global hunger and strives to eradicate hunger across the world. It also aims to bring awareness on the important global issues such as poverty, conflict and climate change that impact the world’s food supply and distribution.   According to FAO, “in recent decades, the world has made significant progress in improving agricultural productivity. Yet, the food systems are still out of balance. Hunger, obesity, environmental degradation, loss of agro-biological diversity, food loss and waste, and a lack of security for food chain workers are only some of the issues that underline this imbalance… This year’s celebration marks the 75th anniversary of FAO in an exceptional moment as countries around the world deal with the widespread effects of the global COVID-19 pandemic… National and local governments, private sector, and civil society need to make sure that food systems grow a variety of food to nourish a growing population and sustain the planet, together.”   The FAO found that nearly 690 million people are hungry, up 10 million since 2019. The COVID-19 pandemic could add between 83 to 132 million people to this number, depending on the economic growth scenario.   The CCC said that preserving access to safe and nutritious food is and will continue to be an essential part of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly for poor and vulnerable communities, who are hit hardest by the pandemic and resulting economic shocks. It cited the “Plant, Plant, Plant” and the Adaptation and Mitigation Initiatives in Agriculture (AMIA) programs of the Department of Agriculture, which promote integrated farming systems in addition to the adoption of other climate change adaptation measures, and have shown positive impacts to communities during the pandemic.   Examples of AMIA village interventions include a greenhouse for vegetable seedling production, mechanical harvester for rice, automatic artificial incubator for chicken eggs, and rotavator, being utilized to generate income and to adapt to climate change. AMIA villages also source additional income from vegetable gardens as well as from livestock while waiting for their main crop to mature or during lull in fishing. Instead of burning agricultural wastes such as rice straw and banana leaves they utilized them as substrates for mushroom production and/ or feed to the vermi worms in organic fertilizer production. The AMIA program is coordinated by the DA-Climate Resilient Agriculture Office (CRAO).   The climate body stressed that the government should scale up these good practices to ensure food supply and that farmers and workers in the agriculture sector remain thriving amid the pandemic.    The agency also stressed that the public must consider growing food at home and in community-run gardens o “gulayan sa barangay” to ensure a steady supply of safe and nutritious food even in this challenging time.
October 16, 2020 Friday
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Message on World Food Day
 
October 16, 2020 Friday
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CCC, DILG Highlight Critical Role of Academic Institutions on Local Climate Action Planning
MANILA, 16 October 2020 — In the second leg of the “Accelerated Climate Action and Transformation (ACT) Local Online Conference,” the Climate Change Commission (CCC), together with the Department of Interior and Local Government, underscored the critical role of higher education institutions (HEIs)  in the development and enhancement of local climate change plans of local government units (LGUs).   The ACT Local Conference, a four-part online webinar organized by CCC, capacitates HEIs from the various regions in the Philippines to provide technical assistance on the climate science, issues, vulnerabilities, and risks to their respective LGUs and communities on the development of science-based and risk-informed local climate plans.   CCC Commissioner Rachel Herrera highlighted the established partnerships of CCC with several academic intitutions through regional consortiums, which serve as platforms for exchanging knowledge and best practices on climate action.   “Through this ACT Local Conference, this convergence initiative, we hope to consolidate and accelerate all our efforts to better support our communities and local government units to deal with the intensifying impacts of climate change. Our aim for this conference is to build their adaptive capacity by providing the right tools and information, enabling partnerships, and expanding networks for LGUs to lead climate action on the ground,” said Herrera.   “This will entail making use of the best available climate science and research to be utilized in your local development strategies and action plans on climate change. As frontliners, you must know the specific risks and threats faced by your communities, so you could plan better and more effectively. This is making the science work for us,” Herrera added.   Mr. Elmo L. Dimaano, Head of the Disaster Risk Reduction-Climate Change Adaptation (DRR-CCA) Section of the Local Governance Training and Development Division of the DILG-Local Government Academy, gave an overview of the development of the enhanced Local Climate Change Action Plans (eLCCAPs) and how these should be anchored on the country’s National Framework Strategy on Climate Change (NFSCC) 2010-2022 and the National Climate Change Action Plan (NCCAP).   “LCCAP is a document prepared by LGUs with substantial content on policies, programs, and measures to increase the community’s resilience to the impacts of climate change, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The NFSCC and NCCAP underscore the integration of [climate] adaptation and mitigation measures into all existing national and local plans and strategies,” said Dimaano.   Ms. Carizon G. Espenesin, Development Management Officer of the Strategic Partnership Division of CCC, discussed how the CCC’s flagship capacity building program, the Communities for Resilience (CORE): Convergence Initiative, supports the strengthening of cooperation between and among sectors towards mainstreaming climate change adaptation and mitigation in local development planning.   “This is not just a sole achievement of the Climate Change Commission. The CORE Initiative really espouses multi-stakeholder convergence within civil society organizations, national government agencies, local government units, private sector. Through this webinar, we are hoping to strengthen our partnership with the academic sectors—our higher educations institutions, local government and state universities and colleges,” said Espenesin.   The ACT Local Online Conference aims to formalize a sustainable partnership between the national government, academe, and the private sector in providing technical and/or financial resources to LGUs on climate action.   Through ACT Local, relevant stakeholders will be capacitated to assist and contribute to efforts that will generate information, boost capacity development, promote cooperation and convergence, facilitate vertical and horizontal alignment for development planning, and access to climate financing windows toward climate resiliency.   The third part of the online webinar, airing on October 20th, will focus on the overview of conducting entity- and community-level greenhouse gas inventory and national and local climate change expenditure tagging.   Interested participants may register through this link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/accelerated-climate-action-transformation-for-local-communities-act-local-tickets-121024931829?aff=PARTICIPANTS   For more information about the ACT Local Online Conference and ACT Local Program, visit the Facebook page of the Climate Change Commission at www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
October 16, 2020 Friday
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