Get ready, be updated. Bringing you the latest news about the Climate Change Commission.
 


 

TAKIP (cover in English) explores the feasibility of using wax from taro leaf (Alocasia macrorrhizos) as a for reusable face mask fabric to repel water. This can protect users from getting COVID-19 from droplets of water. Photo from the presentation of Kiara Raye Cartojano, inventor of Takip. MANILA, 9 November 2021 — In continuation of its COP26 Youth Series, the 69th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” once again highlighted the exemplary innovation of young Filipina innovators and advocacy campaigns of young leaders on climate change adaptation and mitigation.   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda, with CCC Commissioner Rachel Anne S. Herrera as co-host, featured young inventors and climate advocates, including Engr. Aisa Mijeno, Inventor and Co-Founder of Sustainable Alternative Lighting (SALt); Kiara Cartojano, Inventor of Takip (Taro Leaf Wax coating for reusable face mask fabric); Engr. Angelica Anne Munar, an International Eco-Concrete Competition Awardee; and Engr. Danielle Madriaga, Coordinator for The Climate Reality Project Philippines.   “The youth will continue to drive the climate ambition that we need to have as a global community, and the youth will always continue to keep the governments and decision-makers accountable. We hope for the Philippine delegation to deliver, to bring home what we really need here, the support, financing, technology, for us to be successful in limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius,” said Comm. Herrera.   The first three guests shared their outstanding innovations, such as the Sustainable Alternative Lighting (SALt), a sustainable lamp powered by salt water; Eco-concrete made from recycled materials such as fly ash and waste glass combined with pozzolanic tuff; and Takip, a reusable face mask that uses Taro Leaf Wax as a hydrophobic coating for its fabric.   “We need to get ourselves involved because we are all going to be affected by climate change. Accessing of information, learning of what’s happening around is no longer an option, it is an obligation, not just for the youth, but for all of us. Moving and taking part in the solution should be our commitment, not just as a citizen of this country but also as an inhabitant of this world,” said Engr. Mijeno.   “What we can do as a youth is to be responsible for sharing climate information and awareness. Yung mga small actions po, like supporting local businesses that advocate for sustainability, that’s what the youth can also do in addressing the climate problem,” said Cartojano.   "Being eco-friendly does not only talking about shifting material decisions, it is also important to think about everything holistically, about your choices as a whole. Learning is actually limitless, but I believe leadership and sustainability should also be limitless,” said Engr Munar.   Engr. Madriaga, meanwhile, shared her journey as a Climate Reality Leader, the importance of green buildings, and the role of youth in the ongoing climate negotiations in Glasgow.   "To my fellow youth - Take this opportunity to be engaged because this is a critical decade for climate action. No matter where you are, no matter what you are doing, there's always something you can contribute. Take inspiration from the amazing youth innovators and leaders who were able to find a way to contribute in their own fields, and join us in manifesting a better reality, a better normal for all of us,” said Engr. Madriaga.   As a way of supporting young innovators, Deputy Speaker Legarda suggested for all their invention to be transmitted and proposed to the Department of Science and Technology for patenting.   "Lahat ng inventions ng ating mga kabataan ay dapat na mai-share sa DOST Community Empowerment thru Science and Technology (CEST) program at i-adopt, para hindi mawala sa kanila. May mga inventions sila, ngunit busy sa eskwela o walang pondong kapital, kaya nakakalimutan na, sayang lang. Now that we are doing the budget, we can provide an endorsement funding under the DOST-CEST," Deputy Speaker Legarda said.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation. 
November 08, 2021 Monday
MANILA, 8 November 2021 — The Climate Change Commission joins the nation in commemoration of the 8th anniversary of the devastation of Super Typhoon Yolanda (international name: Haiyan) today, November 8, and calls for stronger anticipatory adaptation action to protect the lives of Filipinos as climate risks worsen.   “Eight years on, Yolanda remains a powerful reminder to strengthen our anticipatory adaptation measures to protect Filipinos amid worsening climate risks, and make sure they and future generations will not have to suffer like our people did in 2013,” said the Commission.   This year’s commemoration comes as the world is in deep talks at the 26th Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Glasgow, Scotland. COP26 has been touted as a critical climate summit, especially with the past decade emerging as the warmest on record and with more extreme weather events including typhoons, heatwaves, floods, and forest fires worsening all over the world because of the effects of climate change—effects that disproportionately impact climate-vulnerable countries like the Philippines.   The climate body said that “The latest climate science shows that the coming climate change impacts can be even more frequent and more severe for vulnerable countries like the Philippines, ranked as 4th in the 2021 Global Climate Risk Index of countries most affected by climate-related disasters in the last decade. To be proactive in protecting the lives and livelihoods of Filipinos at the local level, we must build up scientific knowledge on local hazards in our communities to develop risk-adaptive measures. For every coastal community, we must know the risk of storm surge that may go inland and submerge homes, farmland, and other properties. Early warning systems will only be effective if they are actionable, and this means they must consist of understandable information down to the last mile."   Anticipatory or proactive adaptation refers to measures that must take place even before the impacts of climate change are observed, instead of simply reacting to them. Aside from building knowledge on local hazards and strengthening early warning systems, other possible measures include setting new building codes and design standards to address likely hazards, providing incentives for relocating and retrofitting, purchasing insurance and other social protection to cushion losses and unemployment, and adjusting housing conditions to extreme weather events.   Reports from the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council estimate that Yolanda, which made a total of six landfalls from November 8, 2013, affected over 16 million and displaced 5.1 million people, and caused over P95 billion in damages. One of the strongest tropical cyclones in world recorded history, it left 6,300 dead, more than 1,000 missing, and over 28,000 injured in all affected areas.
November 07, 2021 Sunday
MANILA, 3 November 2021 — The 69th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” will once again feature Filipino youth innovators and leaders and their innovations and advocacy campaigns on climate change adaptation and mitigation to inspire more youth to innovate toward a healthy, resilient, and sustainable future.   The online conversation, conceptualized and hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 4 November 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda. Two lucky viewers can win tablets by tuning in throughout the program.   Joining the online conversation are Engr. Aisa Mejino, Inventor and Co-Founder of Sustainable Alternative Lighting (SALt); Engr. Angelica Anne Munar, an International Eco-Concrete Competition Awardee; Kiara Cartojano, Inventor of Takip (Taro Leaf Wax coating for reusable face mask fabric); and Engr. Danielle Madriaga, Coordinator for The Climate Reality Project Philippines.   The youth are leading the charge on climate action. As nations gather to step up climate ambition at the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP26), the voice of the youth on the need for urgent climate solutions should be amplified. Countries must redouble efforts to support the youth who are working for disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation and mitigation, and environmental sustainability.   The upcoming episode shall recognize the Filipino youth innovators and grassroots leaders, to encourage and inspire their fellow youth to be the innovators of the future and contribute to the mitigation of climate change.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
November 02, 2021 Tuesday
MANILA, 3 November 2021 — The Climate Change Commission, in partnership with the Oscar M. Lopez Center, has launched the second Klima Film Festival (KFF) 2021 with the theme, “Adapting for a Sustainable Future: Stepping Up Local Climate Action in a Post-Pandemic World” as it aims to reach  young filmmakers and mobilize them as communicators on the importance of scaling up local climate action.   This year’s KFF specifically focuses on harnessing the potential of films in building awareness and understanding of the climate crisis, and driving action to address its causes and impacts; urging the youth in amplifying the importance of local climate solutions to further increase their influence on local climate policy-making, and generating local climate adaptation stories as viewed by young Filipino filmmakers by providing venue for the production and promotion of climate science-based short films.   In the digital launch held October 29, the CCC and OMLC welcomed the interested youth participants and introduced the mechanics of the film festival.   “On this second year of KFF, I am confident that our youth will make us proud again. Give all your best. Let your creativity flow and shine through. And make a world of difference in building a healthier, safer, and more secure future for all Filipinos,” said CCC Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman.   “I'm looking forward to the entries for this year's Klima Film Festival. The youth is the future, not just of our nation, but of the planetary climate. You will inherit the climate, and to a large degree, you are also influencing what the future climate will be. Therefore, your voice is so important in this conversation,” said OML Center Executive Director Dr. Rodel D. Lasco.   “As one of the members of the youth who have the dedication, the resiliency or have the ability to adapt to change, our love for making different films were affected too by the pandemic.  However, let's remember, fellow youth, that if one door has closed, there's always hope that it will open a new opportunity to come,” said Jerome Pineda of Aquarian Eye Media, who was awarded last year for Best Film for his KFF entry ‘Our World’.   “This prestigious event will not just showcase the talents of the youth, but enables them to learn more about climate change in their locality and translate it into a creative way. By this, the youth will become the tool to educate the people about what we can do to have a sustainable future, and how much time we have left, that we have to move, and that we have to take responsibility as it is all in our hands,” said Mikone Joshua Calungsod of Ang Maharlika Productions, winner of the KFF 2020 Second Best Film for "Verdant."   Chairperson Mary Liza B. Diño of the Film Development Council of the Philippines (FDCP), and Mr. Butch Ibañez, Vice Head of the National Committee on Cinema of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts, were present to support the launch.   “We need loud, energetic, aggressive voices to disturb the downturn and talk about saving rather than wasting. Like Greta Thunberg, KFF and its young invested filmmakers are now about to join this revolution," said Chair Diño.   “The best part of watching any films is what comes right after. The impact. To all the filmmakers, may your films shine a light into array, a spark may be small but within us all, it can be mighty,” said Mr. Ibañez.   The youth participants also joined the General Assembly – the first of the two-part learning workshops for the KFF, where the rationale of the KFF theme, contest mechanics, forms, and gender considerations were discussed.   For the next steps, participants are expected to submit their film concept or synopsis and their team information through the Official Registration of the KFF which can be accessed through this link https://bit.ly/KFF2021TeamRegistration to proceed to the  Climate Film Labs.   Each Climate Film Lab will involve science and film mentors who shall guide the teams on the technical soundness of storytelling and the craft of filmmaking.   For more details about the Klima Film Festival, visit the official Facebook pages of the Climate Change Commission and Oscar M. Lopez Center at https://www.facebook.com/CCCPhl and https://www.facebook.com/OMLopezCenter.   To access the 2020 KFF winners and entries, contact the KFF Secretariat at klimafilmfestival2021@gmail.com.   
November 02, 2021 Tuesday
Photo from the World Meteorological Organization MANILA, 2 November 2021 — The 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) officially starts this week, with the primary goal of increasing ambition and enhancing the Paris Agreement's implementation guidelines to keep the goal of limiting global average temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius within reach.   COP26 President Alok Sharma, MP of the United Kingdom, vowed to move the negotiations forward by resolving the outstanding issues, promoting opportunities for green growth, green jobs, and cheaper, cleaner energy, and launching a decade of every increasing ambition and action.   “The rapidly changing climate is sounding an alarm to the world, to step up on adaptation, to address loss and damage, and to act now to keep 1.5C alive. We know that this COP, COP26, is our last best hope to keep 1.5C in reach, and I know that we have an unprecedented negotiations agenda ahead of us. But I believe, this international system can deliver,” said Sharma.   United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Executive Secretary Patricia Espinosa called upon the Parties to complete the necessary work towards the full implementation of the Paris Agreement. Aside from lowering greenhouse gas emissions, the Paris Agreement should prioritize adaptation agenda, address loss and damage from extreme weather events, and increase the provision of support to developing countries.   “We need to significantly increase financial support, especially for the most vulnerable countries. We also need to accelerate the development and implementation of National Adaptation Plans. A clear path to solutions exists. I call upon all Parties to recapture the spirit of multilateralism that resulted in the adoption of the Paris Agreement and fulfill their commitments under it,” said Espinosa.   Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Chairperson Dr. Hoesung Lee highlighted the importance of science in shaping government policies. Prior to the COP, the IPCC released in August the first part of its ongoing Sixth Assessment Report, which laid out the most up-to-date physical science basis for the understanding of the climate system and climate change.   “I encourage everyone to seize the moment, seize the opportunity this gathering offers. We, the scientific community, are ready to work with you on the understanding of scientific evidence of climate change, its impacts and adaptions and how these translate into realities of climate action,” said Dr. Lee.   76th UN General Assembly President Abdulla Shahid echoed the key messages from the membership of the General Assembly, which include accelerating efforts to ensure that all countries have access to the latest technological innovations; ensure that monetary pledges to net-zero targets are utilized, prioritized, or measured; ensure 50/50 split, in adaptation and mitigation financing; and lead the youth towards blue and green economies.   “Only one variable remains, and it is us. We have to make the choice to address climate change. We have to choose the hard but necessary actions. We have to listen to the science and, increasingly, our global population, who are demanding action,” said Shahid.   Coinciding with the opening of COP26 is the release of the provisional ‘State of the Global Climate 2021’ by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The report draws from the latest scientific evidence to show how the planet is changing “before our eyes.”   The study provides a snapshot of climate indicators such as greenhouse gas concentrations, temperatures, extreme weather, sea level, ocean warming and ocean acidification, glacier retreat and ice melt, as well as socio-economic impacts.   The report finds that the past seven years, including 2021, are likely to be the warmest on record as greenhouse gases reached record concentrations in the atmosphere. Moreover, global sea level rise accelerated to a new high in 2021, with continued ocean warming and ocean acidification.   Based on the data from the months of January to September of this year, the global mean temperature was about 1.09°C above the 1850-1900 average. This may place 2021 as the sixth or seventh warmest year on record globally. But the ranking may change at the end of the year.   Following the release of the report, the Philippines, through the statement of Department of Foreign Affairs Secretary Teodoro Locsin Jr., asked the developed and industrialized countries “to absorb the brunt of hard solutions” and “help those will less capacity, who even now are taking as much of the brunt as they can, without equivocation or purpose of evasion.”   The 26th Session of the Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC or #COP26 is a global gathering to adopt an action plan for all countries to tackle the climate crisis together. It takes place from October 31 to November 12 in Glasgow, Scotland. To know the latest updates about the COP26, visit https://ukcop26.org/.
November 01, 2021 Monday
Pili Seal is a new product innovation of sealant for aircraft integral fuel tank made from the waste of Pili Tree Resin which is also called as “spent resin” or “de-oiled resin”. It was hailed as the 2021 National Winner of the Philippine James Dyson Award. Photo from the presentation of Mark Kennedy Bantugon, the inventor of Pili Seal. MANILA, 2 November 2021 — The 68th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” highlighted the exemplary innovation of young Filipino scientists and advocacy campaigns of young leaders on climate change adaptation and mitigation.   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda, with Atty. Ipat Luna and CCC Commissioner Rachel Anne S. Herrera as co-hosts, featured guests including Mark Kennedy Bantugon, Inventor of Pili Seal and James Dyson Awardee 2021; Naiah Mendoza, Co-inventor of Project FEET and World Robot Olympiad Canada 2020-X Awardee; Adelle Yuson, a physicist from Central Mindanao University; and Marinel Ubaldo, a Climate Reality Leader and the Advocacy Officer for Ecological Justice and Youth Engagement of Living Laudato Si’ Philippines.                                                             Legarda urged the national and world leaders to support young scientists, youth leaders, and young environmental innovators who are working on disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation and mitigation, and environmental sustainability, and hear their voices in calling for climate justice.   "I hope that the youth's presence in Glasgow will really deliver the message of climate justice. We did not cause it, we are 0.3% emitter in global greenhouse gas emissions in the world, but we bear the brunt. But we must not wallow in pity or poverty, because we can do something, not just to mitigate or to reduce our use of fossil fuels, but also to adapt. As Global Champion for Adaptation, my advocacy is to share climate-adaptive practices to the youth, to the agriculture sector, to the business and industry sector, and to everybody,” said Legarda.   The first three guests shared their outstanding innovations, most of which are made from waste materials.   “I want to share not only my invention, but most importantly, its authentic message and intention in sustainable advocacy. I want to introduce a new perspective that a specific waste material, like Pili Tree resin, can give a new function which is beneficial to our community,” said Bantugon.   "Yung project FEET po, more than creating it for the sake of winning the competition, mas importante po na makatulong tayo sa ibang tao at sa ating mundo. Kaya palaging pinaaalala sa amin na everytime na may sasalihan kami, hindi lang dapat mag-isip para sa sarili lang namin, habang bata pa ay magtulungan tayo para in the future, mapigilan natin yung damaging effects ng climate change na nakakaalarma po talaga ngayon,” said Mendoza.   “Being exposed to various experiences allowed me to strive for sustainability, and being a physicist, I am proud to say that from climate to energy, physics has been key to the most pressing issues. I hope that our researchers and scientists would be able to get out of the lab and make it happen for people to enjoy and help make this world a better place to live in,” said Yuson.   Ms. Ubaldo, meanwhile, shared her experiences in mainstreaming climate change issues in her hometown in Samar and their organization’s advocacy in fighting for climate justice.   "In our manifesto during the Youth4Climate: Driving Ambition in Milan, we are requesting countries to ensure the systematic and meaningful engagement by scaling up capacity-building programs and dedicating funds to support the youth participation in decision-making at the multilateral, national, and local levels," said Ubaldo.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation. 
November 01, 2021 Monday
MANILA, 30 October 2021 — Three-term Senator Loren Legarda emphasized the importance of the upcoming talks at the 26th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in securing the lives and livelihoods of Filipinos amidst the intensifying climate crisis.   “COP26—if it delivers—can help secure the lives and livelihoods of Filipinos today and in the future as we continue to deal with the consequences of global warming. Many climate-vulnerable countries like ours are anxiously waiting for its results,” Legarda said.   Almost 200 nations and territories will finally gather in person in Glasgow, Scotland for 12 days of global climate action talks and negotiation from October 31 to November 12, after the COP was postponed last year because of the pandemic.   Hosted by the United Kingdom in partnership with Italy, COP26 will center on four key themes: securing global net-zero by mid-century and keeping 1.5˚Celsius within reach; urgent adaptation to protect communities and natural habitats; mobilizing finance; and working together to deliver the means of implementation to the Paris Agreement: climate finance, technology transfer, and capacity building from developed countries to developing ones.   This year’s summit has been touted as a critical meet given the need for immediate action to prevent the average global temperature from going beyond 1.5˚C and avert the most catastrophic impacts of climate change. 2021 has also been described by scientists as humanity’s “last best chance” to reduce emissions enough to keep the planet below 1.5˚C.   “This is a make-or-break point for all nations to get their act together and agree on how to effectively implement the Paris Agreement, which is meant to limit global warming and ramp up our ability to adapt to worsening climate risks. Our hope is that COP26 will bring major progress on those fronts,” Legarda concluded.
October 29, 2021 Friday
MANILA, 29 October 2021 —  House Deputy Speaker and Antique Congresswoman expressed support to the launch of the Global Parliamentary Group of the Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF), a dedicated program for parliamentarians from across the 48 CVF member-states to support one another to fight the climate crisis.   Legarda said that the Global Parliamentary Group should enable the CVF’s call for a Climate Emergency Pact in safeguarding the 1.5 degrees Celsius limit of the Paris Agreement and the delivery of at least $100 billion per year in climate finance or $500 billion until 2024 for developing countries. She also stressed that ambition must be complemented by the right economic and financial support structures to mobilize climate finance flows to our economies.   “Parliaments must challenge and complement the executive departments to dramatically raise climate ambition. If countries historically responsible for the climate crisis won’t act with urgency, we must act in concert to compel them to take responsibility. We must, in parallel, set a path for ourselves to secure a low-carbon and climate resilient future,” Legarda said.   Legarda explained that CVF Global Parliamentary Group lends further impetus to climate action by establishing a dedicated work plan of legislative activities that will help achieve the targets of the Paris Agreement, Sustainable Development Goals, and Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, as well as support planetary prosperity through Climate Prosperity Plans.   The four activity areas for the CVF Global Parliamentary Group include sharing of best practices and knowledge resources to support active collaboration, development of a unified legislative framework and agenda, and international outreach to engage in dialogue with parliaments outside the CVF in order to encourage robust international partnership for climate action.   “Hard-fought development gains and productivity will continue to be undermined or reversed if the 1.5-degrees is breached. We need unprecedented global collaboration. Let us take this global step together through the CVF Global Parliamentary Group,” Legarda concluded.   The CVF is an international partnership of countries highly vulnerable to a warming planet composed of 48 members across  Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America and the Pacific, representing over 1.2 billion people worldwide.   The CVF Global Parliamentary Group launch was moderated by Mr. Saber Chowdhury, Chair of the Bangladesh Parliamentary Committee on the Environment, Forest and Climate Change, and was held in collaboration with the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) and the Global Center on Adaptation (GCA). The event gathered support from other world leaders, including former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon; Mr. Hassan Latheef, Chair of the Maldivian Parliament’s General Purpose Committee; IPU Secretary-General Martin Chungong; and Mr. Darren Jones, Chair of the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee of the United Kingdom’s House of Commons.
October 28, 2021 Thursday
MANILA, 27 October 2021 — Almost 200 nations and territories will finally gather in-person in Glasgow, Scotland for 12 days of global climate action talks and negotiations, also known as 26th Conference of Parties (COP26) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, after its postponement last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.   Since 1995, the annual climate change conference has brought together delegates around the world led by heads of state, climate experts and negotiators, government ministries, young people, civil society, faith groups, indigenous peoples and even ordinary citizens to forge a global response to keep the temperature rise below dangerous levels and prevent the climate crisis from causing irreversible consequences for the world’s poorest and most vulnerable.   COP26 will be held across two sites: The Scottish Events Campus (SEC), referred to as the Blue Zone, and the Glasgow Science Centre, known as the Green Zone.   The Blue Zone hosts the negotiations. This space brings together delegations from 197 Parties to deliver their statements, stories, and commitments at panel discussions and side events. Meanwhile, the Green Zone is a platform for the general public, youth groups, civil society, academia, artists, business and others to have their voices heard through events, exhibitions, and marches and demonstrations that promote dialogue, awareness, and ambition needed to urgently cut greenhouse gas emissions that have caused the warming of the planet.   Four key themes will run in COP26 are for countries and the world to: ·Secure global net zero by mid-century, and keep 1.5 degrees Celsius within reach; ·Urgently adapt to protect communities and natural habitats; ·Mobilize finance; and ·Work together to deliver the means to implement the Paris Agreement.   This year’s summit is critical as the countries around the world must make an immediate response to prevent the average global temperature from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius compared with levels before the Industrial Revolution, and avoid the most catastrophic impacts of climate change.   This year was described by scientists as humanity’s “last best chance” to reduce emissions enough to keep the planet below 1.5 degrees Celsius of warming. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently released its Working Group 1 report, “Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science Basis 2021,” which shows that the global greenhouse gas emissions are at an all-time high due to human activities.   More extreme weather events are taking place all over the world - including typhoons, heatwaves, floods and forest fires, which are getting worse because of the effects of climate change. The icecaps are melting and sea levels are rising. The past decade was the warmest on record.   Developing countries like the Philippines tend to emit less and are not responsible for most of the emissions but these countries experience some of the worst effects of climate change.   The CCC expects the upcoming COP to prioritize the following key areas:   Green recovery: COP26 is the first COP since the COVID-19 pandemic. Nations will undoubtedly demand this COP26 to ensure the prioritization of green recovery packages in the global climate ambition. The Philippines, being one of the countries with a high number of COVID-19 cases and vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, expects to give preferential attention in pushing this agenda to ensure our pandemic recovery.   Increased climate ambition: This is the country's first COP with a submitted Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) - which commits to a 75 percent reduction and avoidance of GHG emissions. Moreover, parties are required to submit a new NDC every five years. As it has been five years since the Paris Agreement entered into force, parties are expected to outline their increased climate aspirations on the forthcoming COP, especially from the major carbon emitter countries.   Nature-based Solutions: COP26 will begin discussions on how nature-based solutions, such as ecosystems-based practices, can be a climate solution for absorbing greenhouse gases like carbon from the atmosphere.   Loss and damage mechanism: This refers to providing technical assistance to the countries that are vulnerable and have difficulties to adapt to the impacts of climate change, resulting in the loss of land, livelihoods, among others. As a developing country, the Philippines shall urge developed nations to honor their climate financing commitments. The assistance that the country can obtain from them can be utilized to substantially improve our adaptive capacity and pave the path towards climate resiliency.   The Commission believes that the COP26 will bring major progress since the Paris Agreement and new decisions on how to cut GHG emissions.   For the CCC, the forthcoming COP26 should shed a light on the most vulnerable populations, such as women, children and adolescents, persons with disabilities, the elderly, migrants, and indigenous people, who have contributed little to the climate emergency, but are bearing the brunt of the worst consequences of the climate crisis.
October 27, 2021 Wednesday
MANILA, 26 October 2021 — Filipino youth scientists and grassroots leaders will gather virtually to feature their innovations and advocacy campaigns on climate change adaptation and mitigation and to inspire fellow youth to advance the frontiers of innovation toward a healthy, resilient, and sustainable future on the 68th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways COP26 Series" with the theme "Together for a Sustainable Future."   The online conversation, conceptualized and hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 28 October 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda. Two lucky viewers can win tablets by tuning in throughout the program.   Joining the online conversation are Mark Kennedy Bantugon, James Dyson Awardee 2021; Naiah Mendoza, World Robot Olympiad Canada 2020-X Awardee; Adelle Yuson, a physicist from Central Mindanao University; and Marinel Ubaldo, a Climate Reality Leader and the Advocacy Officer for Ecological Justice and Youth Engagement of Living Laudato Si’ Philippines.   The youth are leading the charge on climate action. As nations gather to step up climate ambition at the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climatre Change (COP26), the voice of the youth on the need for urgent climate solutions should be amplified. Countries must redouble efforts to support the youth who are working for disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation and mitigation, and environmental sustainability.   The upcoming episode shall recognize the Filipino youth scientists and grassroots leaders, to encourage and inspire their fellow youth to be the innovators of the future and contribute to the mitigation of climate change.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 25, 2021 Monday
MANILA, 26 October 2021 — Three-term Senator and UNFCCC global champion of resilience Loren Legarda emphasized the need for the upcoming 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) to deliver on the Paris Agreement’s commitments on climate finance if Filipinos are to avoid more greenhouse emissions and survive the intensifying impacts of climate change during a media briefing held Tuesday, October 26 via Zoom.   Legarda gave an opening statement during the Pre-COP26 media briefing convened by the British Embassy Manila, the Embassy of Italy, the United Nations, and the Department of Finance. Newly installed British Ambassador to the Philippines Laure Beaufils also gave an opening statement, along with the DOF and the UN.   “We count on the DOF as head of our national delegation to ensure that developed countries will finally move with urgency to deliver on their commitments in terms of the Paris Agreement’s means of implementation: climate finance, technology transfer, and capacity building from developed countries to developing ones,” Legarda said.   “Without these, the Philippines will not be able to build the capacity and technical know-how we need to avoid more GHG emissions, and we will not be able to survive the intensifying impacts of climate change. The same fate awaits many climate-vulnerable developing countries like us,” she added.   During the briefing, Legarda also emphasized the call of the Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF)—which she co-founded—for COP26 to finalize and deliver strong carbon market mechanisms. Aside from this, Legarda said COP26 should enable emissions avoidance, a concept introduced by the Philippines in the previous COP, by establishing the eligibility of emissions avoidance activities —which, in effect, would allow the Philippines and other developing countries to assert “our right to the remaining global emissions space without actually emitting them.”   Legarda said the Philippines expects also COP26 to agree on a Delivery Plan for the annual $100 billion over five years, from 2020-2024, pledged by developed countries to vulnerable countries to help them adapt to climate change and mitigate further rises in temperature. Rich nations should have delivered $100 billion already starting last year and by 2025, the $100 billion should start increasing steadily yearly. She also expects COP26 to make action on Loss and Damage integral to its outcome. These will be critical to the implementation of the Philippines’ Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) to the Paris Agreement, which will also be brought forward to COP26.   At the same time, however, Legarda emphasized the need for more ambitious national targets—and for making every budget a climate adaptive budget.   “The country's credibility will be on the line with our NDC as it is. It is virtually a business as usual NDC if over 90% of our pledge remains conditional. We are fooling ourselves. These are big numbers that are empty. It’s a big balloon full of nothing but air. It’s high time to fix this,” she said.   During her opening statement, Legarda also highlighted the role of its participants in widening the public’s understanding of COP26 and of broader climate issues.   “I hope this conversation paves the way to building more awareness and spurring the engagement of more Filipinos on critical climate issues in COP26 and beyond,” she concluded.
October 25, 2021 Monday
Contingency planning is important as it sets guidance on how to respond in the event of an emergency or disaster, and helps schools to resume normal activities as quickly as possible. Photo from the presentation of Ms. Monalyn Bermijiso of DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service. MANILA, 22 October 2021 — The 67th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” highlighted the ways the Department of Education (DepEd) instills and practices disaster risk reduction and preparedness in all its offices, schools, and for learners and personnel.   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda, with CCC Commissioner Rachel Herrera as co-host, featured guests including Dir. Ronilda Co and Ms. Monalyn Bermijiso of DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS); Mr. Glenn Sabido from the Schools Division Office (SDO) of Iloilo; Ms. Ghia Ureta from Alasasin Elementary School, SDO Bataan; and Ms. Johannna Mae Sitchon from Panabo City National High School, SDO Panabo City.   “Sa gitna ng iba’t ibang panganib na dala ng mga natural hazards tulad ng bagyo, matinding tagtuyot, lindol, o pagputok ng bulkan, mahalaga na ang ating mga public schools o paaralan ay nasa ligtas na lugar. Kaya dapat ay mayroon tayong risk mapping at risk assessment sa bawat paaralan at bawat local government unit. Ang istruktura ng ating mga paaralan ay kailangang disaster-proof at akma sa local hazards. Ang mga mag-aaral, guro, at mga staff ng paaralan ay kailangang handa rin sa kung ano mang pwedeng mangyari, in the case of a disaster,” said Deputy Speaker Legarda.   The guests shared their initiatives in helping students understand the whys and hows of disaster preparedness and emphasized the importance of making schools and communities adaptive and disaster-resilient.   “Ang ating vision ay maging resilient ang ating mga learners and enjoy and exercise their rights to be safe and protected. Ang learners natin ay vulnerable, pero they are also actors of risk reduction and resilience. Sa ating preparedness ay may meaningful participation ang mga bata, and our personnel act as enablers and support to our learners. Ang ginagawa natin ay system-wide approach, hindi lang sa isang opisina, kundi sa lahat ng levels of governance,” said Dir. Co.   “Paano nga ba natin itinuturo sa mga paaralan at sa ating mag-aaral ‘yung kultura ng paghahanda? Una ay ang pag-integrate natin sa ating curriculum. Based sa ating K-12 curriculum guide, pumapasok ang DRR topics sa mga subjects na: Science, Health, at Araling Panlipunan. Dito natin napag-aaralan ‘yung mga factors na nakakaapekto sa pagbabago ng klima, ano ang dapat gawin ng mga mag-aaral before, during, and after natural hazards, anu-ano ang nilalaman ng GO bag, at ano ‘yung mga survival skills na kailangan nating matutunan,” said Ms. Bermijiso.   “One of our best practices in Iloilo is the Batang Empowered and Resilient Team (BERT) program. Ito ay grupo ng mga estudyante na kung saan ay nagfa-facilitate ng peer-to-peer teaching of DRRM sa kani-kanilang schools. Sila rin ang in-charge sa student-led school watching at hazard mapping kung saan pini-present nila ang result sa kanilang school planning team to be integrated in their school improvement plan and their annual investment plan. They also serve as focal persons of learners in planning for a safe school, and  the one promoting child-centered DRRM in school,” said Mr. Sabido.   “When the COVID-19 pandemic came in, we strategized to create immediate and timely responses to the current health crisis. These include the procurement of emergency response equipment and sanitation materials, availability of isolation room with emergency response equipment, as well as outlining our COVID-19 IATF-aligned school health protocols," said Ms. Sitchon.   “Relative to the efforts of managing disasters in the country, we believe that Alasasin Elementary School has a tangible role in building our community as a resilient learning environment. We plan and commit efforts to create a conducive learning atmosphere and process to enable our learners to develop their full potentials, morals, and skills needed for themselves, their communities, and the country,” said Ms. Ureta.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 21, 2021 Thursday
MANILA, 22 October 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) continues its comprehensive efforts to adapt to a new normal and strengthens climate resilience as it celebrates its 12th year in service tomorrow.   The Commission was formed under Republic Act 9729 or the Climate Change Act signed in October 23, 2009. Under the Office of the President, the CCC is the sole policy-making body of the government tasked to coordinate, monitor and evaluate the programs and action plans of the government relating to climate change.   Despite the imposition of community quarantines brought by the COVID-19 pandemic, the CCC has responded to emerging challenges of the changing policy landscape and pursued the delivery of its mandates more efficiently and effectively.   Through the facilitation of CCC, the Philippines communicated its first Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) on 15 April 2021 to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Towards its implementation and reporting, the CCC has sustained its coordination and collaboration efforts with agencies and institutions in developing policy and measures (PAMs) of the lead sectoral agencies and identifying technical and implementation support needs.   Just last year, the Commission developed major resolutions and policy directives that mainstream climate change adaptation and mitigation actions, which include:   ·Adopting the Thematic Priorities of the Philippine Country Programme for the Green Climate Fund 2019-2023; ·Urging the Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation - Disaster Risk Reduction (CCAM-DRR) Cabinet Cluster, and Its Member Agencies to Adopt the Principles of the Circular Economy, Encourage the Use of Environment-Friendly Products and Practices, And Prohibit Single-Use Plastics in Their Respective Offices; ·Endorsing to the President of the Republic of the Philippines the Submission of the First Philippine Nationally Determined Contribution to the UNFCCC; ·Creating the Interagency Technical Working Group for Sustainable Finance; and ·Promulgating the Call for Nominations to the National Panel of Technical Experts of the Climate Change Commission.   The Commission delivers various technical advisory support and capacity building initiatives geared towards enabling national government agencies and local government units to design and program climate change plans, activities, and programs.   The CCC also pursues enhanced access to finance instruments such as Green Climate Fund (GCF) and People’s Survival Fund (PSF), and continues to monitor progress of public appropriations for climate action.   The Commission also conducted digital climate change capacity building and technical assistance activities to build the adaptive capacities and knowledge on climate change mitigation of national and local stakeholders. These include webinar workshops on NDC, local climate change action plan (LCCAP), national and local climate change expenditure tagging (CCET), and greenhouse gas inventory; PSF e-learning sessions and virtual clinics; and the Klima Film Festival for the youth.   The Commission continues to embark on partnerships with various agencies in government,  the private sector, and civil society to spark local action that bring in new voices that improve areas of action on climate, sustainable  development, and disaster risk reduction.   Moreover, the CCC has been a staunch advocate for gender empowerment and has consistently implemented efforts to ensure gender equity in terms of representation, non-discrimination, and respect of identity.   Recognizing the impacts of single-use plastics on climate, the CCC is also actively pushing for the passage of a landmark law that shall ban the single-use plastics and accelerate the uptake of circular economy to strengthen the country’s climate action.   Amidst the pandemic, the Commission carried out its information and education campaigns and introduced innovations in the delivery of its capacity development programs, through e-learning platforms, webinar presentations on climate change adaptation and mitigation, and other initiatives for public awareness and participation, aside from the regular press releases and artcards posted on the CCC social media accounts.   As the country faces the looming climate emergency, the Commission shall continue to deliver on its programs and outputs as planned and targeted, in line with the goal to build the adaptive capacity of communities, increase resilience of natural ecosystems to climate change, and optimize mitigation opportunities towards sustainable development.   For the succeeding years, the CCC will lay the urgent work ahead towards creating an enabling environment to guide and track progress of the transition to a low-carbon economy and transformation towards a climate-smart Philippines.   To know the various programs and events spearheaded by the Climate Change Commission, visit its website at climate.gov.ph or its social media accounts at CCCPhl.
October 21, 2021 Thursday
MANILA, 20 October 2021 — The 67th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” will feature the programs, projects, and activities of the Department of Education (DepEd) that inculcate disaster preparedness in all DepEd offices, schools, learners, and personnel.   The online conversation, conceptualized and hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 21 October 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl, facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda, and facebook.com/DepartmentOfEducation.PH. Two lucky viewers can win tablets by tuning in throughout the program.   Joining the online conversation are Dir. Ronilda Co and Ms. Monalyn Bermijiso of DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS); Mr. Glenn Sabido from the Schools Division Office (SDO) of Iloilo; Ms. Ghia Ureta from Alasasin Elementary School, SDO Bataan; and Ms. Johannna Mae Sitchon from Panabo City National High School, SDO Panabo City to discuss the DepEd’s disaster preparedness programs and good practices in public schools.   The Philippines, given its geographical location, archipelagic formation in the tropical Pacific, and population distribution, is highly exposed to natural hazards such as storms, flooding, drought, and rise in sea level, and is greatly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.    In 2021, the Global Climate Risk Index listed the Philippines as the number four country most affected by extreme weather events.  The country was likewise ranked ninth highest disaster risk among 181 countries in the world.   Based on the Department of Education (DepEd) Enhanced Basic Education Information System (EBEIS) data from school years 2009-2010 to 2018-2019, 47,188 schools reported to have experienced natural hazards.   Hence, reinforcing the capacities of the whole community towards the risk and adverse impacts of natural hazards is essential in order to reduce vulnerability.   The DepEd recognizes its responsibility in addressing these vulnerabilities. Through its disaster preparedness program initiatives, DepEd aims to protect its education investments, most especially its stakeholders, from the impacts of natural and human-induced hazards.   As part of its disaster preparedness program, the Department through the Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service is currently developing an edutainment series called “The Adventures of Ready Kid!”. This series is intended for children to understand natural hazards and disaster preparedness concepts easily. The series will contain 8 episodes, each providing a discussion on what to do before, during, and after each hazard. It will also introduce basic concepts about each hazard, including their causes or triggers, effects on schools and community, and mitigation measures in the Philippine setting.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 19, 2021 Tuesday
MANILA, 20 October 2021 — The Climate Change Commission and Nestle Philippines are partnering to empower Filipino youth for climate action as they launched “Klimathon: Our Race Towards a Net Zero Reality” on Wednesday, October 20, 2020.   Klimathon is an innovation lab focused on new and workable solutions that can help address current issues on the climate crisis, focusing on plastic waste management, renewable energy and energy efficiency, and food security. The initiative aims to amplify the voice of the youth and highlight their capability to develop and implement meaningful climate actions.   CCC Chairperson-designate and Finance Secretary Carlos G. Dominguez, who formally opened the launch, expressed his gratitude to the organizers and participants of Klimathon for “bringing together bright young minds from all over the country”.   “Your proposals will surely help our experts craft and implement achievable, coherent, concerted, and compelling climate action programs on the ground,” Dominguez said.   Nestle Philippines Chairman and CEO Kais Marzouki likewise highlighted the “crucial and necessary role” of the youth in tackling climate change, especially in addressing plastic problems, lowering greenhouse gas emissions, and ensuring food security.   “At Nestle Philippines, one of the largest markets for Nestle worldwide, we are deeply committed to pursuing our environmental goals. These support the attainment of the country’s Nationally Determined Contribution,” Marzouki noted.   “We cannot do this alone. In order to succeed, we must engage with other stakeholders. Thus, we are happy to collaborate with the CCC towards strengthening initiatives to promote science-based solutions to climate change—in particular, working with our youth,” he emphasized.   CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Emmanuel De Guzman also commended Nestle Philippines “for its express resolve to reduce by half its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 towards net zero by 2050,” as well as for its efforts to engage the youth.   “With the world set to have the largest youth population ever in the coming years, honing their talents and harnessing their creativity to make a difference in climate action and to exemplify a sustainable, climate-friendly lifestyle is key to transforming our society,” De Guzman said.   The partnership was formalized in the signing of a Memorandum of Agreement led by De Guzman and Nestle Philippines Senior Vice President and Head of Public Affairs Arlene Tan-Bantoto. Also giving their messages of support during the launch and signing were Senator Pia Cayetano, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Undersecretary Analiza Rebuelta-Teh on behalf of Secretary Roy Cimatu, The Climate Reality Project Philippines Branch Manager Nazrin Camille Castro, and Kids for Kids Philippines founders Natasha and Isabelle Mañosa-Tanjutco.   Citing a study showing that a six-year-old child today will experience thrice as many disasters than their grandparents, CCC Commissioner Rachel Anne Herrera underscored how young people have been more proactive and more passionate about climate issues.   “We need to work for our youth and with them. This is what Klimathon is really all about—empowering and helping our youth really make an impact,” Herrera added.   The Klimathon is open to groups of Filipino students and young professionals, aged 16 to 24, who could develop projects based on one of the three focus pillars: plastic waste management, energy efficiency and renewable energy, and food security. Finalists will undergo a mentorship program with industry and field experts and cash prizes await the winning teams.   “These subject matter experts are from government, civil society, and even our subject matter experts from Nestle. They will mentor the finalists, and with this Klimathon, they will have more opportunities—they can expand their network, and we can also introduce their innovation to our partners in the whole value chain,” said Nestle Philippines Assistant VP for Sustainability and Public Affairs Christine Ponce-Garcia.   “We will ensure that these ideas come intro fruition through our mentorship, and we will ensure also that these ideas are introduced to our experts not just in Nestle but also in other companies as well,” she added.   Proposals may be sent to klimathon2021@gmail.com on or before November 10, 2021. More details on the competition mechanics are available through this link : https://climate.gov.ph/events/klimathon.
October 19, 2021 Tuesday
MANILA, 17 October 2021 — In observance of the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) pledges for solidarity and promotion of concrete activities geared toward ending poverty.   October 17 is designated as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty through UN Resolution No. 47/196, which aims to raise awareness and highlight the problems faced by poverty-stricken people or families and work towards eradicating poverty globally in all its forms.   People living in poverty experience many injustices in life, including dangerous work conditions, unsafe housing, lack of nutritious food and water, unequal access to justice, lack of political power, and limited access to health care. They are the ones most exposed, least resourced and suffer the most from the climate emergency and the pandemic.    They are at the frontline of climate change impacts with severe drought bringing hunger, and floods wiping away crop fields, leading to loss of livelihoods. They work largely in the informal sector and often live in low-quality, unsafe housing in unhealthy environments next to dumping sites or in unsafe areas along mountain edges or swamps.  When a disaster strikes, their homes and lives are the first to be destroyed. Moreover, they are often excluded from a sustainable lifestyle simply because of their lack of access to financial and physical resources, and yet they also risk being blamed for this.    The COVID-19 pandemic reversed years of progress in the fight against poverty. Millions of people around the world have been pushed into poverty as a result of the economic shutdown, especially in areas where poverty rates are already high.  The ‘new poor’ join the ranks of people already living in poverty pre-pandemic.   As the country embarks in post-COVID recovery and building back better, the CCC said that the people living in extreme poverty should not be returned to the structural disadvantages and inequalities of the past. Rather, they must build forward.   This year’s theme, “Building forward together: Ending Persistent Poverty, Respecting all People and our Planet,” means transforming the relationship with nature, dismantling structures of discrimination that disadvantage people in poverty and building on the moral and legal framework of human rights that places human dignity at the heart of policy and action.   Poverty eradication strategies, climate action and post COVID-19 recovery efforts must equally reach the communities who have been pushed furthest behind and actively encourage and engage them in the implementation of policies and decision-making processes that directly affect their lives.
October 16, 2021 Saturday
MANILA, 16 October 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) joins the call for an improved access to healthy, affordable and sustainable food diets, especially in the era of a global pandemic, in observance of World Food Day today with the theme, “Our actions are our future.”   According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), more than three billion people, or almost 40% of the world’s population, cannot afford a healthy diet, while almost 2 billion people are overweight or obese due to poor diet and sedentary lifestyle.   Moreover, about 14% of the world’s food is lost due to inadequate harvesting, handling, storage and transit, and 17% is wasted at the consumer level, and in turn, emits greenhouse gas.   With COVID-19, intensifying impacts of climate change, and unsustainable management of food, nutrition and food security are expected to worsen, and the vulnerable and marginalized sectors like smallholder farmers and indigenous peoples will be severely affected.   With this, the CCC urges all sectors – national and governments, businesses, civil society groups, academe,  the youth, and individuals – to unite and play more positive roles to end hunger by raising awareness and by adopting a more sustainable food system that shall ensure the production and availability of affordable and nutritious food for every Filipino. These must be done while changing consumption behaviors.   The CCC emphasizes that existing good practices like the “Plant, Plant, Plant” and the Adaptation and Mitigation Initiatives in Agriculture (AMIA) programs of the Department of Agriculture should continue and be strengthened; the Gulayan sa Paaralan of the Department of Education should be supported at the local level; and climate-resilient farming practices should be scaled up to keep a steady supply of healthy food within communities.   The agency also points to the harmful effects of food waste, and presented easy steps to avoid it:   1.    Shop smart by making a list and sticking to it; 2.    Get only what you can eat; 3.    Bring home leftovers; 4.    Store your food correctly; 5.    Save your seeds and either plant or share; and 6.    Compost as much as you can.   The food we produce, purchase, cook, eat, and store impacts the entire food cycle. It is crucial to be mindful of our actions to secure  brighter future of the environment and human beings.   World Food Day is celebrated every year around the world on 16 October in honor of the date of the founding of the FAO in 1945 and to tackle global hunger and eradicate it across the world. It also aims to bring awareness on the important global issues such as poverty, conflict and climate change that impact the world’s food supply and distribution. 
October 15, 2021 Friday
MANILA, 15 October 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) welcomed the new set of its National Panel of Technical Experts (NPTE) in a press conference last October 13.   “We are no longer in the business of building a grand theory about climate change. We are now in the business of implementing concrete projects and programs to build the resilience of our communities, reverse the degradation, and protect our vital food sources. What is global must now be addressed at the local level. What was theoretical now demands practical applications on the ground,” said Department of Finance Secretary Carlos G. Dominguez III, Chairperson-designate of CCC, as he introduced the sixteen (16) new members of the panel.   Under the Climate Change Act of 2009, the NPTE provides technical advice to the Commission in climate science, technologies, and best practices for risk assessment and enhancement of the adaptive capacity of vulnerable human settlements to potential impacts of climate change.   This year, the panel was reconstituted to fill in with outstanding Filipino experts who are working on the ground and engaging with local communities in terms of climate change adaptation and mitigation, in line with the country’s change of paradigm to combat the effects of the climate crisis.   From 130 nominees screened by the Chairperson-designate and the three Commissioners of CCC, the following were selected:   1.    Dr. Jihan H. Adil, environmental planning and engineering expert specializing in wastewater and climate change.from Zamboanga City. She is currently the National President of Society of Environmental Engineers and Head of the Department of Environmental Engineering, Western Mindanao State University;   2.    Dr. Nathaniel R. Alibuyog, agricultural engineer specializing in land and water management, and Dean of the College of Engineering, Mariano Marcos State University in Batac, Ilocos Norte;   3.    Dr. Zenaida L. Andrade, chemical engineer and Associate Professor and Program Coordinator of the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science in Eastern Visayas State University in Tacloban City;   4.    Dr. Wilfredo L. Campos, an expert in biological oceanography, coastal ecology and ecosystems, coral reef ecology, and fisheries. He is currently the Chair of the Division of Biological Sciences, University of the Philippines Visayas;   5.    Dr. Gay D. Defiesta, who specializes in natural resource and agricultural economics, and currently a Professor at the University of the Philippines Visayas;   6.    Dr. Ramon Lorenzo Luis R. Guinto is a staunch planetary health advocate and practitioner. Currently, he is an associate professor of the Practice of Global Public Health and Inaugural Director of the Planetary and Global Health Program of the St. Luke’s Medical Center College of Medicine;   7.    Dr. Eduardo O. Mangaoang, an expert in upland, lowland, and coastal forest landscape restoration and conservation. Currently, he is a Professor and Director of the Regional Climate Change R&D Center of Visayas State University in Baybay, Leyte;   8.    Dr. Jimmy T. Masagca, an expert in fisheries and mangroves, and Professor at the Catanduanes State University and Head of Research and Knowledge Management of the Pacific Island Institute for Pedagogy, Technology, Arts and Sciences;   9.    Dr. Susan P. Mercado, an international public health and food security expert. She has served as Undersecretary of the Department of Health and current Director of the Food Systems and Resiliency Program at the Hawaii Public Health Institute, and Special Envoy of the President for Global Health Initiatives;   10. Dr. Richard N. Muallil, a marine scientist and a recognized expert in coastal resource management and marine protected areas. He is the Director of Continuing Education and Extension Services, Mindanao State University in Tawi-Tawi;   11. Dr. Doracie B. Zoleta-Nantes, a specialist in geography and hazards studies, and President of Southern Luzon State University in Lucban, Quezon Province;   12. Dr. Emma E. Porio, a specialist in climate and disaster vulnerability and gender assessment, and Professor Emeritus at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, School of Social Sciences of the Ateneo de Manila University. She is also a Science Research Fellow of the Manila Observatory where she is Project Leader and Principal Investigator of the transdisciplinary action research project, "Coastal Cities at Risk: Investing in Climate and Disaster Resilience in the Philippines (CCARPH);   13. Dr. Patricia Ann J. Sanchez, a licensed agricultural engineer specializing in disaster risk management and water resource assessment. She is currently an Associate Professor and Chair of the Interdisciplinary Studies Center for Water (ISCW) at the University of the Philippines Los Baños;   14. Engr. Merriam M. Santillan, a geodetic engineer, and Dean of the College of Engineering and Geosciences at Caraga State University in Butuan City;   15. Dr. Encarnacion Emilia S. Yap, a post-harvest fisheries technology specialist, and Dean of the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of the Philippines Visayas; and   16. Dr. Maria Angela G. Zafra, an expert in inclusive business models, sustainable finance, and gender inclusivity, and adjunct faculty at the School of Business and Governance, Ateneo de Davao University. She is the executive director of the Strategia Development Research Institute, a nonprofit research organization providing policy research, capacity building, and technical assistance in various social and economic development areas.   The CCC Commissioners also welcomed the new members of the panel.   "The science of climate change is unequivocal, its message to everyone is clear: We’re all in danger, our survival is at stake, and urgent action can still save us. I trust that our new assembly of experts will be truly generous in lending their knowledge and expertise and untiring in helping convey this compelling message of science down to the last mile,” said Secretary Emmanuel M. de Guzman.   "It is time to localize everything: It's not about concepts anymore, but this is bringing action now to the local level. That is actually the purpose of mainstreaming climate change action which, as expected, should not just linger on the nationwide scale, but translated into local actions with corresponding benefits,” said Commissioner Noel Antonio Gaerlan.   "The climate crisis is based on solid scientific analysis, but it is also best explained as a human-caused problem caused by collective behavior. Our accumulated carbon emissions in the atmosphere are products of fossil fuel-based technology and energy, and they are also borne out of human activity and choices. Together with the diverse roster of experts, we can make climate science accessible and understandable to our communities on the ground as tools for decision-making and investment planning,” said Commissioner Rachel Anne S. Herrera.   The Commission also expressed their gratitude to the former members of the panel, who served from 2015 up to September of this year.   To know more about the new NPTE, visit the CCC Facebook page at https://facebook.com/CCCPhl or its website at https://climate.gov.ph/our-story/our-experts/profiles-of-members. 
October 14, 2021 Thursday
MANILA, 13 October 2021 — In celebration of the International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) amplifies the call for international cooperation to reduce disaster risk and losses.   October 13 is designated as the International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction through UN Resolution 64/200, which aims to raise awareness on the importance of shifting from post-disaster reaction to pre-disaster action and how countries must build their capacities in managing disaster and climate risk, in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030.   The Sendai Framework has seven strategic targets and 38 indicators for measuring progress on reducing disaster risk and losses. The year’s theme focuses on the sixth target: “Substantially enhance international cooperation to developing countries through adequate and sustainable support to complement their national actions for implementation of the present Framework by 2030.”   The CCC said that this year’s target underscores that reducing disaster risk has never been more challenging due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the growing climate emergency.   Disasters disproportionately affect developing countries, particularly archipelagic countries or countries with extensive coastlines like the Philippines, due to higher vulnerabilities and increased risk levels especially in terms of mortality, numbers of people injured, displaced and homeless, economic losses (as a percentage of GDP) and damage to critical infrastructure.   The impacts of disasters, most of which have increased in intensity and have been exacerbated by climate change, often greatly exceed the country’s capacity to respond to and recover from disasters and impede progress towards sustainable development.   For the CCC, there is a need to scale up international cooperation for disaster risk reduction to support climate-vulnerable countries in setting climate change adaptation and resilience-building programs, in order to build resilience and reduce risk against the impact of climate hazards such as droughts, floods and rising sea-levels.   These include capacity-building, technology transfer, and increasing the availability of and access to multi-hazard early warning systems at the local level which are vital to support adaptation in climate-sensitive sectors such as health, water and agriculture.   As COP26 approaches, the CCC hopes that the forthcoming conference will deliver on the promise of significantly increasing levels of global ambition when it comes to both reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and support to climate change adaptation.   Moreover, international cooperation for disaster risk reduction is needed to ensure that our most vulnerable populations, including women, children and youth, people with disabilities, the elderly, migrants and indigenous people, which have contributed the least to the climate emergency, are not abandoned or left behind. 
October 12, 2021 Tuesday
MANILA, 12 October 2021 —  The 65th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” featured climate change adaptation and resilience practices as well as the protection and restoration efforts of our fisherfolk and advocate groups to support the fisheries sector.   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by a three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda featured guests including Roberto “Ka Dodoy” Ballon, Chairperson of the Coalition of Municipal Fisherfolk Associations in Zamboanga Sibugay and 2021 Ramon Magsaysay awardee; Ruperto “Ka Uper” Aleroza, National Anti-Poverty Commission Vice Chair for Basic Sectors; and Atty. Rhea Yray-Frossard, Fisheries Management Officer and Coordinator. Climate Change Commissioner Rachel Anne Herrera opened the show and joined as co-host.   “Sa gitna ng lumalalang krisis sa klima o climate emergency, patuloy na pag-init ng mundo, pagtaas ng lebel at pag-init ng tubig-dagat dahil sa pag-absorb ng extra carbon dioxide na nasa hangin, polusyon at plastic wastes, illegal fishing activities, ano na ang kalagayan ng ating karagatan, coral reefs, mangroves, at mga isda? What are the practices related to climate change adaptation na nakatutulong sa pagprotect at pagrestore ng marine ecosystems ang pwede nating gamitin o matututunan mula sa mga komunidad at organisasyon na naging successful na sa pag-implement ng mga ganitong practices? We will discuss ways of protecting and healing our marine environment in order to revive the fisheries sector,” said Commissioner Herrera.   Mr. Ballon shared their story of reviving the dying fishing industry through mangrove restoration and implementing sustainable fishing practices. He recalled that before, mangrove forests have been converted into aquaculture farms  As mangrove forests vanished, fishers are catching less amount of fish, which led them into poverty. Eventually, fishers resorted to dynamite fishing, which further led to destruction of their fishing areas.   To restore fish catch and marine habitats, Ballon and others have started to plant mangroves. Today, through the Coalition of Municipal Fisherfolk Associations in Zamboanga Sibugay (Comfas), more fishers and coastal municipalities now understand the importance of a healthy marine ecosystem for sustainable fisheries by replicating their mangrove planting initiatives.   “Mayroon tayong karagatan at iyon po ang ating bangko. Tuwing wala po kaming pera pantustos sa aming pamilya at kabuhayan, nagwi-withdraw po kami sa aming bangko. Ngayon, alam na namin kung paano pangalagaan ang ating napakayaman na bangko na karagatan, na may mangrove, sea corals, at sea grasses. Hindi lang kami nag wi-withdraw, kung hindi nagde-deposit din kami sa pamamagitan ng pagtatanim ng mangroves, hindi pagtatapon ng basura, coastal clean-ups, at hindi pagsira ng karagatan tulad ng illegal fishing,” said Ballon.   Atty. Frossard shared the Oceana’s efforts in helping the fisherfolks and coastal communities adapt to the impacts of climate change through information and education campaigns, and lobbying science-based policies for ocean conservation, fisheries protection, and food security.   “In our problem with climate change, everything is connected, and we need to act now. Ito yung kailangan naming ma-emphasize talaga that in Oceana there’s a sense of urgency in implementing full and effective implementation of our laws in prioritizing the fisherfolks that are most vulnerable with the effects of climate change. Empowering coastal communities amid the pandemic is an opportunity we cannot afford to miss,” said Atty. Frossard.   Mr. Aleroza shared the efforts of the National Anti-Poverty Commission in protecting the rights of the fisherfolk and building their climate resilience, and emphasized the need for the establishment of a department that will facilitate the matters concerning fisheries.   "Kung pag-uusapan ang epekto ng climate change, talagang napakalaki ang impact nito sa ating mga mangingisda. Ang pag-init ng tubig ay nagkakaroon ng coral bleaching o pagputi ng ating bahura. Dahil diyan ay namamatay din yung mga organic na pagkain ng mga isda at lumalayo ang ating mga isda sa iba pang uri ng nabubuhay sa ating katubigan. At dahil din sa init na nararamdaman ng mangingisda habang nasa laot, hindi na kami makatagal. Gustuhin man namin na may mahuli pa, 'pag sobrang mainit na ay kailangan na naming umuwi. Dahil doon, ang epekto naman sa kabuhayan namin ay yung pagbaba ng aming huli at kita," said Aleroza.   Legarda lauded these initiatives and efforts of fisherfolk groups and fisheries advocates, and vows to further help the fisheries sector to thrive amid COVID-19 and climate emergency and achieve sustainable development.   “Ang ating karagatan ay bangko ng pagkain, pagmamay-ari nating mga Pilipino, at ang ating mga mangingisda ang siyang nangangalaga rito. Dapat na magtulungan tayo para mapalaganap natin ang Ecological Solid Waste Management Law sa 80 provinces, at sa mahigit na 800 coastal cities and municipalities sa ating bansa,” said Legarda.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation. 
October 11, 2021 Monday
MANILA, 8 October 2021 — New members of the Climate Change Commission (CCC) National Panel of Technical Experts (NPTE) will be announced by the CCC together with the Department of Finance (DOF) in an online press conference on Wednesday, October 13, 2021 to be livestreamed on the CCC and DOF Facebook pages at facebook.com/CCCPhl and https://www.facebook.com/DOFPH.   The new NPTE members will be joined by DOF Secretary and CCC Chairperson-designate, Carlos G. Dominguez, CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Emmanuel M. de Guzman, and CCC Commissioners Noel Antonio V. Gaerlan, and Rachel Anne S. Herrera. The presscon will be moderated by DOF Assistant Secretary Paola Alvarez.   “After two months of nomination and selection, we are now ready to welcome the newly-appointed panel of technical experts that shall guide us as we strengthen evidence-based action towards addressing the climate crisis,” said Secretary de Guzman.   The NPTE is composed of experts in various disciplines related to climate change and disaster risk reduction. The experts pool provides technical advice to the Commission in climate science and its cross-cutting sectoral themes, green technologies, and best practices for risk assessment and enhancement of the adaptive capacity of vulnerable communities to potential impacts of climate change, as created under the Climate Change Act of 2009 or Republic Act No. 9729.   The call for nominations opened in July 7 of this year with the aim to broaden the country’s pool of experts on climate change and ensure institutional, regional, sectoral, and gender representation in the NPTE membership.   Know more about the National Panel of Technical Experts’ activities by visiting the website of the CCC at https://climate.gov.ph/our-story/our-experts/national-panel-of-technical-experts-forum.
October 07, 2021 Thursday