Get ready, be updated. Bringing you the latest news about the Climate Change Commission.
 


 

MANILA, 3 March 2022 — Following the latest report of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that further reveals the Earth’s vulnerability to the impacts of climate change, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) emphasizes the urgent need to accelerate and strengthen adaptation and mitigation measures, especially at the community and local level.   The contribution of the IPCC’s Working Group II to the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), affirms that  “global warming has caused dangerous and widespread disruption in nature,” and “climate change is affecting the lives of billions of people, despite efforts to adapt.”   “I have seen many scientific reports in my time, but nothing like this. Today’s IPCC report is an atlas of human suffering and a damning indictment of failed climate leadership. With fact upon fact, this report reveals how people and the planet are getting clobbered by climate change,” said UN Secretary-General António Guterres.   To recall, the Working Group I report, released in August 2021, showed that emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities are responsible for approximately 1.1°C of warming since 1850-1900, and  that over the next 20 years, global temperature is expected to reach or exceed 1.5°C of warming.   The second installment of the AR6 focuses on the impacts of climate change on nature and people around the globe, explores the future impacts at different levels of warming and the resulting risks, and offers options to strengthen nature’s and society’s resilience to ongoing climate change, to fight hunger, poverty, and inequality and keep Earth a place worth living on – for current as well as for future generations.   “The report is a dire warning about the consequences of inaction. It shows that climate change is a grave and mounting threat to our well-being and a healthy planet. It also shows that our actions today will shape how people adapt to climate change and how nature responds to increasing climate risks,” said IPCC Chair Hoesung Lee.   The report introduces a special section on climate change impacts, risks, and options to act for cities and settlements by the sea, tropical forests, mountains, biodiversity hotspots, dryland and deserts, the Mediterranean as well as the polar regions; and an atlas that will present data and findings on observed and projected climate change impacts and risks from global to regional scales.   Specifically, the report presents the following points:   ·Human-induced climate change, including more frequent and intense extreme events, has caused widespread adverse impacts and related losses and damages to nature and people, beyond natural climate variability. Some development and adaptation efforts have reduced vulnerability. Across sectors and regions the most vulnerable people and systems are observed to be disproportionately affected. The rise in weather and climate extremes has led to some irreversible impacts as natural and human systems are pushed beyond their ability to adapt.   ·Progress in adaptation planning and implementation has been observed across all sectors and regions, generating multiple benefits. However, adaptation progress is unevenly distributed with observed adaptation gaps. Many initiatives prioritize immediate- and near-term climate risk reduction which reduces the opportunity for transformational adaptation.   ·Evidence of observed impacts, projected risks, levels and trends in vulnerability, and adaptation limits, demonstrate that worldwide climate resilient development action is more urgent than previously assessed in AR5. Comprehensive, effective, and innovative responses can harness synergies and reduce trade-offs between adaptation and mitigation to advance sustainable development.   “Our atmosphere today is on steroids, doped with fossil fuels. This is already leading to stronger, longer, and more frequent extreme weather events. Climate change-induced disasters come with high human and economic impacts,” said World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Secretary-General Prof. Petteri Taalas.   “This new IPCC report comes out at a time of great turmoil, when we need strong multilateralism to promote peace and a healthy environment. And the message this report sends is clear. Climate change isn’t lurking around the corner, waiting to pounce. It’s already upon us, raining down blows on billions of people,” said UN Under-Secretary-General and UN Environment Programme Executive Director Inger Andersen.   Meanwhile, the Working Group III report, which will focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions (climate change mitigation), will be released on April, according to the IPCC.   The CCC said that the latest IPCC release evidently illustrates the catastrophic effects of climate change and of rising temperatures in many parts of the world, including our country. Action to help our communities adapt is urgently needed.   Further, the National Panel of Technical Experts of the CCC has recently identified the leading climate-induced risks in the Philippines along with recommended strategies and measures to address long-term vulnerabilities and increase the country’s adaptive capacity to the impacts of the worsening climate.   The Commission vows to accelerate and improve local climate action by making climate risk information more available, understandable, and actionable. Despite the challenges of a global pandemic, the CCC will continue to strive to reach and capacitate as many local governments as possible in understanding risks and how these should be addressed by implementing effective and coherent adaptation and mitigation measures.   Access the Working Group II’s contribution to the Assessment Report through this link: https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sixth-assessment-report-working-group-ii/ and watch the replay of the launch through the Facebook page of the IPCC at https://www.facebook.com/IPCC/videos/646659490000380.
March 03, 2022 Thursday
MANILA, 2 March 2022 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) joins the celebration of World Wildlife Day tomorrow.   March 3 of each year marks the celebration of World Wildlife Day, in support of wild fauna and flora across the world and their role in ecosystems, and serves as a reminder to step up the fight against wildlife crime and human-induced reduction of species. The date also recognizes the day the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was signed in 1973.   This year’s theme, “Recovering key species for ecosystem restoration,” draws attention to the state of endangered and critically endangered wildlife, and to reverse their fate by implementing and supporting conservation and habitat restoration efforts. This aligns with UN Sustainable Development Goals 1 (No Poverty), 2 (Zero hunger) 12 (Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns), 13 (Climate Action) 14 (Life Below Water) and 15 (Life on Land).   Climate change is one of the greatest threats to our wildlife. Intense storms destroy nesting trees, drown animals, spread invasive species, and damage marine ecosystems. Prolonged heat and droughts stress plants and animals and burn grasslands and forests. Seasonal changes in plant growth causes unsynchronized animal life cycles.   High temperatures lead to ocean acidification and bleaching of coral reefs, which countless marine species depend on for food and shelter. Warmer waters also cause changes in ocean currents, altering migration patterns. Melting of mountain glaciers and land ice threatens species located in the Polar region, while sea level rise affects coastal wildlife.   With the increasing numbers of endangered and extinct species, the CCC urges all sectors of society to work together to change the course by conserving threatened species and protecting their habitats from threats such as climate change and biodiversity loss.   By raising awareness and educating the people on the importance of supporting wildlife conservation and protection, we as humans can help chart a path towards a sustainable future, with the goal of living in harmony with nature.
March 02, 2022 Wednesday
MANILA, 1 March 2022 — In observance of the Fire Prevention Month, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) reminds the public to take preventive measures to make our communities and the environment safe from fires.   The month of March is declared as the Fire Prevention Month by the virtue of Presidential Proclamation No. 115-A.    March is one of the hottest months of the year and the beginning of summer season. During this period, a lot of fire incidents are happening across the Philippines. Although our country is well-known for devastating typhoons, we also record fire incidents not only in urban areas, but also in mountains and forests. Wildfires are caused by a lot of factors, such as temperature, terrain, soil moisture, forest fuels, wind speed and direction, and frequent lightning strikes. These conditions are worsened by climate change. The changes in climate causes increase in average annual temperature, drier conditions, and drought, which elevates the risk and severity of wildfires. Burning forests release greenhouse gas thereby contributing to global warming.   This year’s theme, “Sa Pag-iwas sa Sunog, Hindi ka Nag-iisa,” encourages every individual to take preventive measures to avoid fire incidents. The Commission reminds the public to practice fire safety measures at home, community, forests and mountains. These include following safety protocols for handling fire when camping and storing fuel, proper disposal of cigarette butts, and local implementation of wildfire preparedness measures.
March 01, 2022 Tuesday
MANILA, 28 February 2022 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) and Oscar M. Lopez (OML) Center revealed today the six (6) distinguished judges for the Klima Film Festival 2021. They are as follows:   ·Dr. Doracie Zoleta-Nantes, Chairperson of the National Panel of Technical Experts   Dr. Nantes is currently the President of Southern Luzon State University. A recipient of the Most Outstanding Alumni Award from the University of the Philippines Los Baños, her specializations include Human Geography of Disasters, Natural Hazards, Environmental Migration and Rural-Urban Dynamics in Cities and Developing Agricultural Regions.   ·Dr. Rodel D. Lasco, Executive Director of the Oscar M. Lopez Center   Dr. Lasco is a pioneering and multi-awarded scientist with more than 36 years of experience at the national and international level. He is an author of several reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, as well as a member of the National Academy of Science and Technology in the Philippines.   ·Ms. Mary Liza B. Diño, Chairperson of the Film Development Council of the Philippines   As the current Chairperson and CEO of FDCP, Ms. Diño streamlined the agency's existing programs and aggressively conceptualized and implemented new, sustainable programs and initiatives that encompassed all areas of film industry development, from policies and legislation, training and education, international alliances and collaborations, workers' welfare and information, and support for Filipino filmmakers in all aspects.   ·Ms. Honey M. Castro, Chief of Corporate Affairs and Information Resource Management Division of the Philippine Commission on Women   With 20 years of experience in the government service, Ms. Castro is an expert in gender and development, communications, and advocacy management.   ·Dr. Rolando B. Tolentino, Professor at the University of the Philippines Film Institute and member of the Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino   Dr. Tolentino is currently a Professor at the University of the Philippines Film Institute. He has written extensively on Philippine cinema, literature, and popular culture producing more than 90 publications. Some of his works include “Like/Unlike: Kuwentong Facebook at Politika ng Agam-agam” (2014), “Almanak ng Isang Aktibista” (2011), and “Sakit ng Kalingkingan: 100 Dagli sa Edad ng Krisis” (2005).He is also a member of Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino and the Film Development Council of the Philippines. ·Ms. Sari Raissa LL. Dalena, Professor at the University of the Philippines Film Institute and an independent filmmaker   Ms. Dalena is currently a Professor at the University of the Philippines Film Institute. She won twice at the URIAN Film Awards for two short films: “Asong Simbahan” and “Mumunting Krus”. Her first feature-length documentary, “Memories of a Forgotten War,” had the honor of being the closing film at the Documentary Fortnight in New York City’s Museum of Modern Art and was screened at the Rotterdam International Film Festival. Memories of a Forgotten War and From Asia With Love are being distributed by Third World Newsreel. Her short film “Kamikaze” was selected at the Clermont Ferrand Short Film Market.   The esteemed jurors, hailed from the science and film industry, evaluated the short films for their cinematic attributes and technical execution, story and content, impact, as well as gender considerations.   Aside from the Best Film, these judges shall also determine the winners of the special awards including Best in Climate Advocacy, Best Screenplay, Best Director, Best Cinematography, Best Performance, Best Musical Scoring, Best Production Design, and Gender Balance Award.   Catch the winning films during the KFF 2021 Awarding Ceremony on March 11, 2022 at 1:00-3:00 PM via Zoom and Facebook Live through the pages of the Climate Change Commission and Oscar M. Lopez Center, in  collaboration with iWant TFC, as the KFF’s Official Media Partner, and the Support CCC II Project implemented jointly by the CCC and the GIZ Philippines.   The Klima Film Festival, a joint initiative with the OML Center started last year, aims to mobilize the youth in amplifying the importance of local climate solutions to further increase their influence on local climate policy-making, and generate local climate adaptation stories as viewed by young Filipino filmmakers by providing venue for the production and promotion of climate science-based short films.   For more information about the Klima Film Festival, visit the Facebook Page of the Climate Change Commission at facebook.com/CCCPhl, its website at https://climate.gov.ph/events/klima-film-festival/kff-2021, or message the KFF Secretariat at klimafilmfestival2021@gmail.com.
February 28, 2022 Monday
MANILA, 21 February 2022 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) recently released a handbook featuring climate change adaptation and mitigation programs of various local communities in the Philippines.   “Stories of Resilience: A Compendium of Local Climate Action in the Philippines” is a compilation of stories of hope and first-hand experiences of communities building resilience to the impacts of climate change, from practicing climate-smart farming and disaster risk reduction and recovery, to sustainable transport, and ecotourism.   It also features the origins of resilience and adaptation initiatives all over the country, the insights gleaned in their implementation, and their impacts within communities and beyond.   Some of the communities featured in the handbook are: Province of Batanes;  San Fernando, La Union; Pasig City and Marikina City; Pandan, Antique; Del Carmen, Siargao Islands; and Kabasalan, Zamboanga-Sibugay.   The Compendium aims to encourage other LGUs to embrace climate adaptation and mitigation activities and processes, and consolidate support from other stakeholders in the towards creating an innovative and evidence-based climate action. The said handbook is an initiative led by the office of former Commissioner Rachel Anne S. Herrera.   “This Compendium is tangible proof that no community is alone in looking for solutions. Many sectors and groups across the Philippines are finding ways to secure a better future for us in this climate crisis. This ultimately is what Compendium offers: not just best practices, not just blueprints for effective local climate action, but hope itself that we can find solutions to the great challenges ahead of us,” said Herrera during the Compendium’s virtual launch during the 14th Global Warming and Climate Change Consciousness Week.   To learn more about the Compendium, visit the CCC’s website at https://climate.gov.ph/newsroom/must-see.
February 21, 2022 Monday
MANILA, 16 February 2022 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) will hold National Climate Change Expenditure Tagging (CCET) training sessions this February, an annual activity under the national budgeting process, in coordination with the Department of Budget and Management (DBM).   The sessions form part of continuing efforts to build the capacity of national institutions in mainstreaming climate change in the domestic plans and programs of the country.   The CCET provides an avenue for National Government Agencies (NGAs), State Universities and Colleges (SUCs), and Government Owned- and Controlled-Corporations (GOCCs) to assess the alignment and scale of mobilization of public funds based on the National Climate Change Action Plan (NCCAP). Further, the CCET classifies public expenditures between climate change adaptation and mitigation through the use of typologies mirroring the NCCAP.   Below are the scheduled CCET sessions:   a.    Orientation for Government-Owned and -Controlled Corporations (GOCCs) 21 February 2022 (PM Session)   b.    Orientation for State Universities and Colleges (SUCs) 22 February 2022 (Luzon – AM Session) 22 February 2022 (Visayas – PM Session) 23 February 2022 (Mindanao – AM Session)   c.     Orientation for Program Convergence Budgeting for Risk Resiliency Program (PCB- RRP) 23 February 2022 (PM Session)   d.    Orientation for National Government Agencies (NGAs) 24 February 2022 (AM Session)   The sessions will include discussions on Introduction to Climate Change, Linkage of CCET to the Philippine Development Plan, Sustainable Development Goals, and NCCAP; Overview of Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation – Disaster Risk Reduction; and Entering CCET to the Online Budget Submission Portal.   The CCET was established through Joint Memorandum Circular (JMC) 2013-01 of the CCC and the DBM, which was amended through DBM-CCC JMC 2015-01 to be consistent with the development of an outcome-based budgeting system.   For more information about the CCET, visit the website of the CCC at https://climate.gov.ph/our-programs/climate-change-expenditure-tagging or the National Integrated Climate Change Database and Information Exchange System of the CCC at https://niccdies.climate.gov.ph/climate-finance/ccet.
February 16, 2022 Wednesday
MANILA, 16 February 2022 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) and Oscar M. Lopez (OML) Center announced today the list of qualifying films for the 2021 Klima Film Festival (KFF).   The second edition of the KFF with the theme, “Adapting For A Sustainable Future: Stepping Up Local Climate Action in a Post-Pandemic World,” was launched in October last year to highlight the importance of local climate action that will optimize our nation’s future — to plan, build, and support sustainable communities.   Prior to submission of films, participating teams have undergone mentoring sessions and rigid film production from science experts and film directors.   Science experts included Ms. Liz Courtney from Earth Observatory of Singapore, Dr. Noralene Uy, member of experts pool of the National Resilience Council, and National Panel of Technical Experts’ members Dr. Jihan Hashim-Adil, Dr. Patricia Sanchez, and Dr. Maria Angela Zafra.   Meanwhile, the film directors included Zig Dulay and Honee Alipio. Participating teams submitted their short film entries which run from seven to ten minutes. Films went into three screening processes – team eligibility, submission eligibility, and technical quality – before reaching the final judging.   Here are the shortlisted films for KFF 2021:   ·Modern Stray by Trianggulo Productions   Sunny, 21, has been called cheeky, rude, and materialistic. As she is writing content for her YouTube channel, she sees a picture of her childhood home in Batangas and hatches a plan to feature her provincial roots.   In her hometown, she retraces her past. The reflections and realizations for Sunny prod her on to a new path as an advocate for the environment.   ·Sigalot: Sa Pagitan ng Tao at Kalikasan by ENCA Film Production   Sa isang komunidad, may tatlong magkakapatid na nakatira malapit sa karagatan: sina  Luntian, Benilda, at Bagwis. Sa kabila ng pagiging pipi ni Benilda, patuloy siyang gumagawa ng mabuti para sa kalikasan. Isang araw, sa hindi inaasahang pagkakataon, nagkasakit si Bagwis sanhi ng maruming paligid. Dahil dito, sumubok si Luntian ng Pagbabago. Nagsimula siyang maglinis kasama ang ibang tao— subalit kritisismo at pagsalungat sa kanyang gawain ang inabot niya sa malalapit na kakilala.   Sa muling pagbabalik ni Luntian, baon na niya ang ideya, mungkahi, at adbokasiya na babago sa kanilang komunidad. May pag-asa kayang makamit nila ang pagkakaisa?   ·Tanaw by Playback Multimedia   Aira Mendoza is a 17-year-old HUMSS student raised by her mother, a retired Barangay Captain and environmental activist.   Schoolwork brings Aira to in-depth research on the many reasons for climate change, and onsite in a quarry. Standing up for a cause, she also finds new passion and education.   ·Viridescent by MCDP Films   Viridescent is a drama-filled science fiction in the tradition of verdant. A visionary woman and a defeatist man, each with their own convictions, must work together to retrieve crucial biological data that has been lost. Leila Montesclaros, a renowned scientist, and Noah Bolfango, the mission captain and software engineer of the genesis in Mars, have scanned and transcripted every frequency in the last five years. Then, a breakdown of communication between the two.   Dr. Leila Montesclaros must draw upon her ingenuity to fulfill their dream of securing planet Earth for humankind again. To reserve the planet that is solely ours. Our home. Our Viridescent.   Two other films, Iitaw by Cordrake Visuals and Little Things by Le Maire will vie for the Most Liked Poster and Most-Watched Trailer awards.   The festival will showcase the finalists through a Special Screening which will be held on March 9-10, 2022. With two sessions per day, the event will run from 10:00 AM-12:00 NN and 1:00-3:00 PM, respectively.   Moreover, the Awarding Ceremony will be held on March 11, 2022 at 1:00-3:00 PM where the KFF 2021 shall award the Best Film to receive Php 70,000, and other awards.   Both activities will be via Zoom and Facebook Live through the pages of the Climate Change Commission and Oscar M. Lopez Center, in the collaboration with iWant TFC, as the KFF’s Official Media Partner, and the Support CCC II Project implemented jointly by the CCC and GIZ Philippines.   For more information on the shortlisted films, full schedule of KFF Film Screening, and updates on the awarding ceremony, visit the Facebook pages of CCC and OML Center at facebook.com/CCCPhl and https://web.facebook.com/OMLopezCenter, or their websites at https://climate.gov.ph/events/klima-film-festival/kff-2021 and https://www.omlopezcenter.org/klima-film-festival-page.
February 16, 2022 Wednesday
MANILA, 7 February 2022 — Fisheries and marine conservation experts shared their insights on how the fisheries sector can be  climate-resilient and sustainable during the 76th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” with the topic “Fish for Change: The Fisheries Sector Fighting Climate Change.”   The online conversation, conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda featured guests including Atty. Alexandra Gamboa, Board Trustee of Philippine Reef and Rainforest Conservation Foundation; Fel Ceasar Cadiz, Director of Behavior Adoption & Training of RARE Philippines; and Antonio Fabela Regis, Jr., Junior Research Fellow of the Department of Climate Change of IIT Hyderabad. Atty. Rachel Anne Herrera also joined as co-host of the show.   Atty. Gamboa tackled the impacts of climate change on fisheries and shared the initiatives of Philippine Reef and Rainforest Conservation Foundation, Inc. (PRRCFI) on marine conservation.   “PRRCFI is a non-government organization in southern part of Negros. Currently, our areas of work are local initiatives in conservation, as well as ensuring or encouraging governance mechanisms for cooperation among relevant stakeholders. Mayroon din kaming education programs and programs on the sustainable business development, including ecotourism,” said Atty. Gamboa.   Cadiz introduced the “Fish Forever Program,” where the science of human behavior is used to encourage individuals and communities to adopt more sustainable practices and develop solutions to tackle globally significant and wicked environmental challenges.   “Addressing the problem of climate change and overfishing requires everyone. In the Philippines, the main message of our program is to work together, because we are all stakeholders to the state of our fisheries. Let's work together for the change we want,” said Cadiz.   Regis discussed the importance of building climate-resilient fisheries in the Philippines through nature-based solutions.   “The Philippines is one of many countries with high vulnerability to climate change. Our fishery is a finite resource – yes it is renewable, but limited and delicate. Building climate-resilient fisheries in the Philippines is ensuring that the quality, diversity, and availability of fishery resources will be sufficient for present and future generations, so as much as possible, in decision-making, planning, and resolving issues, we make sure that we consider nature-based solutions first,” said Regis.   Legarda also shared some of the initiatives, policies, and programs she had implemented in Antique to help the fishing communities thrive amid the impacts of the climate crisis. The province is known for having vast stretches of coastlines and an abundance of fish species. She also encouraged the government to provide adequate support to enhancing the production of the aquaculture sector and close gaps in fish production and ensure food security.   “I-operationalize at i-identify natin ang mga simpleng alituntunin, halimbawa dagdagan ang fishing boat, bigyan ng cold storage, glass freezer, lambat, ayusin ang daungan, i-research kung ano yung sustainable fishing practices ng sinaunang mga henerasyon, at bawal ang cyanide. Kapag ginawa ito ng bawat LGU at coastal barangay sa Pilipinas, hindi na tayo kailangan pang mag-angkat ng isda,” said Legarda.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
February 07, 2022 Monday
MANILA, 31 January 2022 — Young Climate Reality Leaders shared their experiences in engaging with various communities and critical decision-makers as part of climate action during the 75th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways” with the topic “Young Climate Leaders Breaking Barriers.”   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda featured guests including Ferth Vandensteen Manaysay, Engagement Officer of the Climate Reality Philippines; Sara Jane Ahmed, Finance Advisor to the Vulnerable Group of Twenty (V20) of Ministers of Finance of the Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF); and Carissa Pobre, Strategist for Creative Collaboration of Agam Agenda. Atty. Rachel Anne Herrera also joined in the episode as co-host.   Manaysay introduced MapaKalamidad.ph, a digital platform intended for vulnerable communities, government agencies with limited technical means, and individuals with modest means for data usage. MapaKalamidad.ph harnesses the power of social media and instant messaging platforms to crowdsource information about calamities and disasters at the street level   “Young people are still seen as passive victims during typhoons but we still have the strong potential to make collective capacity to drive solutions. We hope that MapaKalamidad.ph could really provide a concrete way to enhance the role of youth in educating, advocating, communicating disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation,” said Manaysay.   Pobre introduced Agam Agenda, a dynamic, shape-shifting platform for creative, trans-disciplinary collaboration designed to grow and contribute to fluid networks of climate-aware writers, artists, scientists, youth, and campaigners. Their campaign “When Is Now?” is comprised of stories, poems, photography, and other forms of art that aim to spread awareness on the issue of the climate crisis and can be used as a platform to demand climate justice.   “We must win when it comes to the climate crisis, but first, we must write. Agam Agenda tells the stories of those who truly feel the impact of the climate crisis,” said Pobre.   Ahmed discussed her work as a Finance Advisor of the V20 Group. She is the first Filipino and Bangladeshi awardee of the Climate Breakthrough Project, given to changemakers and leaders with bold ideas that could quickly and dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and fight climate change. Her breakthrough strategy is the Climate Prosperity Plan (CPP), which aims to catalyze economic transformation through investments in financial and energy planning in the world’s most climate-vulnerable countries.   "The Philippines is actually one of the founding members of the V20 back in 2015. It aims to translate the political ambition in the Climate Vulnerable Forum to real economic outcomes. When it comes to climate change, we know that significant losses and damages are being felt as the result of extreme weather events, sea-level rise, and other issues that are brought about by the climate crisis,” Ahmed stressed.   As a climate reality leader herself, Legarda lauded the guests for continuously inspiring and motivating more individuals and communities to take urgent climate action.   "We can talk all we want but talk is talk. But to see lives change even the small purok or city, and a barangay, or school, that would be good," said Legarda.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
January 31, 2022 Monday
MANILA, 25 January 2022 — The Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways will return with new episode this week, showcasing young Climate Reality Leaders (CRL) and their innovative ideas and solutions on the climate crisis. Invited CRLs will also share their experiences in engaging with various communities and critical decision-makers, while ensuring inclusive and genuine representation of young people and other vulnerable sectors.   The online conversation, conceptualized and hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 27 January 2022, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   The upcoming episode, entitled “Young Climate Leaders Breaking Barriers,” will feature guests including Ferth Vandensteen Manaysay, Engagement Officer of the Climate Reality Philippines; Sara Jane Ahmed, Finance Advisor to the Vulnerable Group of Twenty (V20) of Ministers of Finance of the Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF); and Carissa Pobre, Project Assistant of Agam Agenda.   The upcoming episode will provide viewers insights on stories and innovations of the invited CRLs that have made a mark in the climate movement. The discussions will focus about their work and experiences as young climate leaders to inform other climate advocates and the general audience on the role of the youth in climate action and the need for urgency to address climate change.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
January 25, 2022 Tuesday
MANILA, 4 January 2022 —  The Climate Change Commission (CCC) welcomes a new set of Certified BERDE Professionals within the agency after ten staff passed the comprehensive BERDE Professionals Basic Training Course and Qualifying Examinations.   BERDE, short for ‘Building for Ecologically Responsive Design Excellence’, is a tool to assess, monitor, and certify the performance of green building projects, above and beyond existing national and local building and environmental laws, regulations, and mandatory standards.   The BERDE Course was developed by the Philippine Green Building Council (PHILGBC) and aims to increase capability of professionals and project proponents in implementing green building projects. The training includes sustainability in buildings and in-depth discussion on the BERDE Green Building Rating System.   To advance the greening of Philippine healthcare facilities and implement relevant green building initiatives as part of the country’s climate action response, the CCC, along with 16 staff from the Department of Health (DOH) as the lead implementing agency for the climate-smart hospitals project, participated in the said training program.   Advancing green buildings is one of the priorities of the Commission as a crucial adaptation measure to the impacts of climate change in the most vulnerable communities, and to mitigate carbon emissions from built infrastructure.   To know more about BERDE and its courses, click the link: https://philgbc.org/become-a-certified-green-building-professional-2/. 
January 03, 2022 Monday
MANILA, 3 January 2022 — For its New Year special, The Best of Stories for a Better Normal Part 2 will air this week, focusing on the importance of reducing single-use plastic consumption.   The online conversation, conceptualized and hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 6 January 2022, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Selected segments from previous episodes and conversations with Czarina Constantino of WWF Philippines from our Episode 29 Uniting Against Single-Use Plastic episode; Marian Ledesma of Greenpeace from our episode 47 Uniting Against Single-Use Plastic episode; and Adeline Almelor from Iriga City, Camarines Sur from our Episode 49 Zero-waste and Innovative Community Pantries episode, will be featured, along with an introduction by Rachel Anne Herrera, CCC Vice Chairperson.   The Philippines is one of the major sources of plastic trash in the world's oceans, contributing almost three million metric tons of plastic wastes and 500,000 metric tons of plastic waste leakage per year. This special episode will feature organizations that seek to raise awareness on the scale of plastic pollution, and an online store focused on reducing single-use plastic.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
January 02, 2022 Sunday
MANILA, 30 December 2021 —  As part of technological innovations to address the climate crisis, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) had set up its climate information portal, tagged as the National Integrated Climate Change Database and Information Exchange System (NICCDIES).   Launched in May 2018, NICCDIES, which can be accessed through https://niccdies.climate.gov.ph/, is the Philippines’ first digital transparency system intended to serve the general public by providing climate data on climate change adaptation, climate change mitigation, climate finance, climate reports, and many more.   The lack of access to and understanding of climate information has been a major challenge not just in assessing and responding to similar climate hazards, but in enabling effective climate action. Access to climate information has been found to enable households and communities to take action to protect lives, livelihoods, and assets.   The NICCDIES portal is the CCC’s primary enabling platform for consolidating and monitoring data and information on climate change and climate action from public and private sector sources, allowing decision-makers to access, share, and exchange these data for policy-making, development planning, and investment decision-making. It includes database and information systems on the Philippine Greenhouse Gas Inventory Management & Reporting System; Adaptation; National and Local Climate Change Expenditure Tagging (CCET); National Climate Change Action Plan Monitoring and Evaluation; Local Climate Change Action Plans (LCCAP) database for monitoring and tracking; and Gender and Climate Change.   The CCC likewise highlights the importance of addressing inequity in access to climate information, which is often rooted in gender inequality and other sources of marginalization. To provide key information on the distinct impacts of climate change on women and gender-diverse persons, the CCC launched the “NICCDIES Gender and Climate Change” corner earlier this year.   The corner features an overview of Gender and Climate Change, and includes reference resources, international and local plans for mainstreaming gender into climate action, Philippine reports on Gender and Climate Action, and CCC’s efforts to mainstream gender into its mandate—including its Gender and Development (GAD) Focal Point Systems, its GAD Plan and Budgets, its GAD Accomplishment Reports, and its Gender Mainstreaming Evaluation Framework Report. Moving forward, the Commission continues to enhance the content of the corner, and works to develop a sex-disaggregated database on climate change.   Apart from the CCC’s official website, NICCDIES also serves as an enabling platform for consolidating and monitoring data and information on climate action from public and private sector sources, as well as other stakeholders, allowing decision-makers to access, distribute, and exchange these data for use in policymaking, development planning, and investment decision-making.   As part of the regular updating and enhancement of NICCDIES, the CCC plans to include the measurement, reporting, and verification of the Philippine Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC), as the tool and system for tracking information necessary for transparency, clarity, and understanding.   NICCDIES is one of the Commission’s efforts to improve access to relevant climate information and intensify climate information, education, and communication strategies of all sectors, as well as to improve the government’s e-governance and online presence amid the COVID-19 pandemic. 
December 29, 2021 Wednesday
MANILA, 22 December 2021 — Following the onslaught of Typhoon Odette (international name: Rai) in central Philippines, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) urged to strengthen adaptation actions at the local level in order to build community resilience against extreme climate-related events and minimize loss and damage.   In the latest report by the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC), Typhoon Odette affected 1.1 million Filipinos in 3,238 barangays, claimed 156 lives, and incurred damages to houses, infrastructure, and agriculture amounting to PHP390,587,949. The typhoon also cut off power, water, and communication lines. At least 12 cities and municipalities were declared under a state of calamity.   Along with other tropical cyclones experienced by many Filipinos as the strongest in their lifetime, Typhoon Odette is a stark reminder of how extreme weather can destroy entire towns and cause the suffering of millions in several hours of landfall.   Odette flattened houses and damaged critical infrastructure including airports, municipal halls, and evacuation centers, toppled electric posts and telecommunication towers, and crippled energy supply and the delivery of critical services.   As the level of global warming continues to increase, these extreme weather events and other climate impacts are becoming severe, and may be irreversible, threatening to further set back our growth as a nation. The rise in temperature intensifies the water cycle, bringing more intense rainfall and associated flooding, as well as more intense drought in many regions.   As stated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in their 6th Assessment Report released in August  2021, “it is likely that the global proportion of category 3-5 tropical cyclone instances and the frequency of rapid intensification events have both increased globally over the past 40 years”.   National agencies and local government units must have stronger consideration of climate science in crafting policies and implementing projects and programs for our most vulnerable regions, as well as for companies, businesses, and households to be more aware of the specific climate risks and hazards in their area. A systems-wide transformation is essential to climate-proof our future and will entail a shift in every aspect of planning and investing for development.   In order to adapt to the intensifying effects of climate change, as part of long term recovery and rehabilitation, the climate body and its National Panel of Technical Experts raised the following points:  Building the capacity of our local governments and communities to understand climate-related risks and hazards and therefore prepare and implement climate and disaster action plans with systems redundancy to save lives and minimize loss and damage; Raising the minimum standards in building homes and critical infrastructure to withstand strong winds from extreme weather events, as well as creating green spaces within urban infrastructures that can help mitigate floods; Improving early warning systems by providing impact-based forecasting that is more understandable and actionable for communities in order to prepare and heed call for evacuation before calamities strike, especially for those residing in high-risk areas; Conducting nationwide regular typhoon preparedness and response drills similar to those for earthquakes; Adopting a "sister cities and municipalities" program for exchange of urgent relief and assistance between two or more towns; andTranslating climate information into knowledge products and further integrate climate action into our education curriculum across all levels.  As the country reels from the aftermath of Typhoon Odette, the Commission underscored the non-negotiable goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius—our climate threshold for survival. 
December 21, 2021 Tuesday
MANILA, 15 December 2021 — Part 1 of “The Best of Stories for a Better Normal” will be aired this week, focusing on efforts to preserve nature and promote backyard food gardening.   The online conversation, conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 16 December 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   The new Vice-Chairperson and Executive Director of the Climate Change Commission, Rachel Anne S. Herrera, will join as co-host.   Highlights from previous episodes and interview clips from Lee Ann Canals-Silayan, Founder of Kaleekasann nursery from our Planting Native Trees episode; Diding Libao of Inang Maria’s Garden from our May Pagkain sa Bakuran episode; and Karen Hizola, Executive Director of Global Seed Savers Philippines from our Saving Seeds and Growing with Nature episode, will be featured.   Almost two years into the pandemic, many Filipinos have turned to planting and cultivating more greenery for their food source, or as a hobby to cope with stress from the sudden isolation. This upcoming episode will put a spotlight on the importance of food security, native trees propagation, and saving seeds.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
December 14, 2021 Tuesday
MANILA, 15 December 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) reminds the local government units and the citizens to prepare as Typhoon Odette enters the Philippine Area of Responsibility and is expected to make landfall within the vicinity of Caraga or Eastern Samar on Thursday afternoon or evening.   According to the latest bulletin of PAGASA issued at 11:00 AM today, Typhoon Odette was estimated at 590 km East of Hinatuan, Surigao del Sur, with maximum sustained winds of 120 km/h near the center, gustiness of up to 150 km/h, and central pressure of 975 hPa.   Tropical Cyclone Wind Signal No. 2 was raised on the Eastern portion of Surigao del Norte (Claver, Siargao and Bucas Grande Islands) and Surigao del Sur, while 28 provinces and areas are listed under Tropical Cyclone Wind Signal No. 1.   Residents especially those in areas with public storm warning signals should regularly monitor weather updates and advisories for evacuation; while disaster preparedness and response agencies should be on alert for emergencies and concerned government departments ready to provide basic needs and relief items for residents in temporary shelters and affected areas.   With the Philippines being regularly visited by typhoons every year, the CCC urged the public to be aware of early warnings issued by their local government units and enhance their knowledge on disaster preparedness measures, especially that we are now experiencing stronger, more intense typhoons due to the changing climate.   Among the top 10 climate-induced risks identified by the CCC’s National Panel of Technical Experts are flooding; increase in frequency and severity of tropical cyclones; extreme rainfall; and wind patterns.   The CCC encourages local government units, especially those in the vulnerable communities, to intensify its climate change adaptation programs with disaster prevention and preparedness as its priority.   Adaptation actions include early warning communication down to the sitio or purok level; nature-based solutions such as planting of mangroves and trees; creation of permanent evacuation facilities; enhancing preparedness of hospitals and medical facilities; and providing training on every barangay and local government officials on disaster preparedness.
December 14, 2021 Tuesday
MAYNILA, ika-15 ng Disyembre 2021 — Ating ipapalabas ngayong linggo ang “The Best of Stories for a Better Normal” Part 1 kung saan ibibida ang ilang natatanging mga tagpo mula sa mga nakaraang episodes. Mapapanood ang interview clips kina Lee Ann Canals-Silayan, na Founder ng Kaleekasann nursery mula sa ating Planting Native Trees episode; Diding Libao ng Inang Maria’s Garden mula sa ating May Pagkain sa Bakuran episode; at Karen Hizola, Executive Director ng Global Seed Savers Philippines mula sa Saving Seeds and Growing with Nature episode.   Ang online talakayan, na hango sa konsepto ng three-term Senator, na ngayo’y Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, ay ipapalabas sa Huwebes, ika-16 ng Disyembre 2021,10:00 ng umaga via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl, facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Kasama bilang co-host ang bagong Vice Chairperson at Executive Director ng Climate Change Commission na si Rachel Anne S. Herrera.   Halos dalawang taon sa gitna ng pandemya, maraming mga Pilipino ang bumaling at lumipat sa pagtatanim at pag-aalaga ng mas maraming mga halaman para sa kanilang pagkain, o simpleng kahiligan para lang makayanan ang tindi at bigat ng biglaang pagkakahiwalay sa normal na pamumuhay. Ibibida sa susunod na episode ang kahalagahan ng food security, native species ng mga puno, at pag-iipon ng mga binhi.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan, kamalayang pang-kapaligiran, at mga kasanayan sa pakiki-angkop sa klima, naglalayon ang “Stories for a Better Normal” na baguhin ang kaisipan ng bawat Pilipino, mga pamilya at pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga paraan kung paano maisasakatuparan ang ‘better normal’ sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.   Ang online na talakayan na ito ay na-organisa sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission, na binigyang-suporta naman ng Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines at Mother Earth Foundation.
December 14, 2021 Tuesday
MANILA, 14 December 2021 —  The 74th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” highlighted the eco-friendly practices and alternatives made by micro-and social enterprises for gift-giving and celebrations this holiday season.   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by a three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda, with CCC Commissioner Rachel Anne S. Herrera as co-host, featured guests including Shine De Castro, Co-Founder of Old Manila Eco Market in Intramuros, Manila; Erin Larissa Canto, Project Officer from Wala Usik Economy in Bacolod City and Talisay City, Negros Occidental; and Jade Joquiño, Co-Owner of Darlings’ Milktea in Maasin, Iloilo.   “Micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) are all over the country and comprise around 99% of the Philippine economy. They are very important in our national productivity. Kaya gusto natin i-emphasize na kung ang ating MSMEs at social enterprises ay environmentally-conscious, they can play a significant role in reducing waste, promoting culture and heritage, and creating green jobs and opportunities in the community,” Commissioner Herrera emphasized.   De Castro shared the COVID-19 response of the MSMEs and how tourism places like the Intramuros are bouncing back sustainably through Baluarte San Diego Eco-Market, which offers eco-friendly and naturally-made products, upcycled and handmade products, regional products, and fresh produce from Intramuros urban farm.   “Naniniwala po kami na having a sustainable lifestyle doesn’t stop in just refusing single-use plastic. Ito po ay nasa lahat ng aspeto ng ating pamumuhay. From food to tourism, to building a sustainable community, to even fashion,” said De Castro.   Canto introduced Wala Usik stores, which prototypes reducing single-use plastic packaging from fast-moving consumer goods sold in small quantities.   “We got inspired with how we used to see sari-sari stores before here in the Philippines nung hindi pa widely-used yung plastics. We can see that items are stored in glass jars, banana leaves, people are using their own bayongs in purchasing items, tapos we are supporting local economy. We thought of, “Why not bringing that back in the modern times?, and this is where Wala Usik Tiyangge and Kapehan were born,” said Canto.   Joquiño introduced Darlings’ Milktea, a local milktea shop that serves their beverages not on plastic cups, but in reusable and locally-made bamboo cups.   “We are receiving great feedback that Darlings milk tea is a sustainable milk tea shop. We also receive recognition in different magazines and tv shows about our shop and this helps us send a message to everyone that we need to go back to our sustainable way,” said Joquiño.   Legarda lauded these small businesses’ efforts in integrating sustainability in their daily operations. She encouraged other MSMEs and businesses to join the crusade towards sustainability, especially during this holiday season where Filipinos are accustomed to buying presents for their loved ones.   “All that glitters is not gold, because you can find gold even in trash. Recycle, upcycle, and find beauty in everything around us,” said Legarda.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
December 13, 2021 Monday
MAYNILA, ika-8 ng Disyembre 2021 — Sa ika-74 na episode ng seryeng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways”, ibibida natin ang micro at social enterprises na nagpapatupad ng waste management at nagsusulong ng mga eco-friendly na mga regalo sa pagdiriwang ng kapaskuhan.   Ang online na talakayan, sa  pangunguna ng three-term Senator, ngayo’y Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, ay ipapalabas sa Huwebes, ika-9 ng Disyembre 2021,10:00 ng umaga via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl, facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda, and facebook.com/DepartmentOfEducation.PH. Dalawang masuwerteng manonood ang maaaring manalo ng mga tablet kung makakapag tune in sa buong programa.   Kasama sa pag-uusap sina Shine De Castro, na Co-Founder ng Old Manila Eco Market sa Intramuros; Erin Larissa Canto, na Project Officer mula sa Wala Usik Economy sa Bacolod City at Talisay City, Negros Occidental; at si Jade Joquiño, na Co-Owner ng Darlings’ Milktea sa Maasin, Iloilo.   Ang mga environmentally conscious micro at social enterprises ay may mahalagang papel sa pagbabawas ng basura, pangangalaga sa kapaligiran, pagsusulong ng lokal na kultura at heritage, at pagbibigay ng mga trabaho at economic opportunities sa ating mga pamayanan.   Ibibida sa episode na ito ang mga pamamaraan tungo sa sustenableng pamumuhay mula sa pang araw-araw hanggang sa mga pangpaskong mga karanasan at gawain ng mga karaniwang mga Pilipino.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan, kamalayang pang-kapaligiran, at mga kasanayan sa pakiki-angkop sa klima, naglalayon ang “Stories for a Better Normal” na baguhin ang kaisipan ng bawat Pilipino, mga pamilya at pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga paraan kung paano maisasakatuparan ang ‘better normal’.   Ang Stories for a Better Normal ay na-organisa sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission, na binigyang suporta ng Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, at Mother Earth Foundation.
December 07, 2021 Tuesday
MANILA, 7 December 2021 — The Climate Change Commission’s National Panel of Technical Experts (NPTE) laid out climate science, innovative technologies, and strategies for multi-sectoral cooperation for national and local governments to minimize loss and damage from climate-induced risks and achieve long-term resilience.   In a roundtable discussion held during the annual observance of the 14th Global Warming and Climate Change Consciousness Week, the NPTE identified top 10 climate-induced risks such as (1) sea level rise, (2) coastal erosion, (3) flooding, (4) increase in frequency and severity of tropical cyclones, (5) extreme drought, (6) temperature increase/rising urban heat index, (7) extreme rainfall, (8) climate influenced diseases, (9) wind patterns, and (10) biodiversity loss.   “We need to push for collaboration between local government units and higher education institutions to generate regional databases on climate change concerns and issues, integrate climate change adaptation programs in university extension and research, reorganize disaster risk reduction management councils and increase community groups' scientific knowledge on disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation to inform the people and facilitate their access to the People's Survival Fund,” said Dr. Doracie B. Zoleta-Nantes, chair of the NPTE.   “Looking at the commonalities in terms of challenges in the cities of Cagayan de Oro, Ormoc, Angeles, Legazpi, and Tagum, we will notice that some challenges, which include sea-level rise and coastal inundation, saltwater intrusion, waste management, higher rainfall intensity leading to higher flooding and rain-induced landslide, water supply and demand, drought, poor city zoning, and urban heat island effect, are happening and quite common in the five cities,”  said Dr. Patricia Ann J. Sanchez.   “The recent experiences in flood hazard mapping made clear that our local government units are really in need of technical capacity-building activities, for them to maximize the use of latest technologies, and to help them enhance their resilience and reduce their vulnerability to climate impacts like flooding. Therefore, higher education institutions must continuously engage with the local community to inform and capacitate them to mitigate the negative impacts of flooding, as well as in evaluating adaptation strategies,” said Engr. Merriam M. Santillan   “In achieving the mission of developing sustainable innovations, the NPTE, in collaboration with SUCs, ensures a holistic approach toward climate resilience through science, technology, innovation, and policy recommendation for faster adoption and adaptation. We will support upscaling of adaptable and applicable technologies to other provinces to reach greater impact,” said Dr. Nathaniel R. Alibuyog.   “Given the intersecting risks and vulnerabilities, climate and disaster scientists must generate knowledge with local stakeholders, professionals, and practitioners. We must work with public and private sectors to design preventive program measures, preparedness, and information dissemination programs, in order to reduce the impacts of typhoons, floods, sea-level rise, and loss of livelihoods of fisherfolks and farmers,” said Dr. Emma E. Porio.   “During monsoon months, typhoons and floods lead to large damage and losses to cities and localities, especially marginal and vulnerable communities. Our Climate and Disaster Risk Assessment showed Iloilo City as highly exposed and vulnerable to flooding, storm surge, sea-level rise, and drought,” said Dr. Gay D. Defiesta.   “For NPTE climate action, we are suggesting the revitalization of climate change research and development units in state colleges and universities; formation and operationalization of climate action network at the regional as well as national levels; the LGU adoption for climate action program; learning from the locals and knowledge-sharing, bringing back science-based knowledge to the locals; and the adoption of climate and disaster risk financing and insurance for inclusive access to catastrophic insurance at the lowest sustainable cost among our poor and vulnerable local communities,” said Dr. Eduardo O. Mangaoang.   “We are advocating for the private sector to integrate ecosystem-based adaptation as natural capital. It has a direct effect on businesses, which include asset protection, damage cost avoidance, carbon sequestration, alignment to changes in corporate strategy or values, revenue generation, and ultimately, it has the potential to lower the risk profile of businesses in their day-to-day operations, which ends up into a positive cash flow for companies, and improves their respective bottom lines and business performance in general,” said Dr. Maria Angela G. Zafra.   “In order to increase our resiliency to the impacts of climate change on our water resources, we must adopt water demand management. It includes any actions that reduce the amount of freshwater that we use, or that keep the water cleaner in the course of that use than it otherwise would be. It involves the use of technical, administrative, economic, financial, social, and political approaches and practices in order to reduce the use of water, with the goal of securing long-term, reliable, affordable, and safe water supply for the benefit of society and the environment,” said Dr. Jihan H. Adil.   “COVID-19 reminded us about the prime importance of our health. Let us make sure that health is not forgotten as we survive and thrive in this era of a warming planet,” said Dr. Ramon Lorenzo Luis R. Guinto.   “One thing that poses a serious threat to the health of families and communities is displacement. Once people have to leave their homes and be in a place temporarily and unexpectedly, where they do not have access to most basic needs like water, food, and clothing, then we are likely to see outbreaks of diarrheal disease, skin disease, exacerbation of hypertension and diabetes, and the mental health dimension, which could be stress and the suffering that comes from not being in our home,” said Dr. Susan P. Mercado.   “Fisheries are also facing a changing climate. Rising temperatures, increased rainfall, shifting wind and current patterns, will necessarily change seasonal productivity patterns in coastal waters, increasing further the impacts on our resources. We can take measures to make the catching of fish more sustainable in the long term, and by doing so, we reduce our vulnerability to climate change,” said Dr. Wilfredo L. Campos.   “The generation of new fisheries and aquaculture technologies that can withstand the impacts of tropical cyclones and other calamities must be done in order to mitigate their impacts. We should use the best available climate science and strategies in order to combat and mitigate the effects associated with any climate-induced risk,” said Dr. Encarnacion Emilia S. Yap.   “Our surveys from over 50 coastal municipalities show that around 68% of the municipal waters or coastal fisheries are already overfished. The results are underestimated since we did not account for the illegal and destructive fishing practices, which are still rampant in many areas of the country,” said Dr. Richard N. Muallil.   The roundtable discussion brought together state universities and colleges, higher education institutions, local government unit representatives, and various national government agencies, to highlight the importance of local involvement in climate action.   Following the forum, the CCC and the Department of Finance will hold a media briefing this December 9 about climate hazards in the Philippines and actions that the government has been doing to address these risks. Interested media participants may register through this link: bit.ly/CCNPTERegistration.
December 06, 2021 Monday
MANILA, 7 December 2021 — The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST-PAGASA) and the Manila Observatory have released a report on historical and projected annual climate extremes in the country, warning Filipinos of a warmer climate and of its worsening consequences across different sectors.   The report, titled “Philippine Climate Extremes Report 2020: Observed and Projected Climate Extremes in the Philippines to Support Informed Decisions on Climate Change Adaptation and Risk Management,” presents the projected changes in 24 climate extremes indices for RCP4.5 and RCP8.5—referring to representative concentration pathway, which is a greenhouse gas concentration trajectory adopted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. RCP8.5 is the basis for worst-case climate change scenarios.   During its launch held during the annual observance of the 14th Global Warming and Climate Change Consciousness Week, the authors introduced the findings of the report, and tackled the consequences on agriculture, human health, water resources, environment and biodiversity, and infrastructure. The report also outlined adaptation options that may help reduce the possible impacts.   “How will the future climate of the Philippines look like based on our analysis of the climate extremes indices? Extreme temperature indices are all pointing towards a warmer climate throughout the Philippines as we go further into the future, with the RCP 8.5 scenario showing warmer temperature increases than the RCP 4.5 scenario, as expected,” said Dr. Francia Avila of Manila Observatory.   The report can be used to identify areas and sectors which are most at risk to climate extremes and thus require rapid disaster risk assessment and climate adaptation planning to minimize current and future impacts. Local government units can use this report in formulating local climate change action plans and mainstreaming of national climate change initiatives.   The report also includes the Climate Extremes Risk Analysis Matrix (CERAM), a complementary tool to Climate Information Risk Analysis Matrix (CLIRAM), that aims to help users in developing their disaster risk assessment and climate adaptation plans. Also presented during the launch was the Climate Information Map, an interactive map that allows users to access datasets on climate projection information within the country.   During the launch, representatives from national government agencies, local government, and the academe who are working on climate science shared their insights on the said report.   “We highly commend PAGASA for developing a portal where planners, local government units, and other users can easily download the data... The DHSUD, through our support to such endeavors, would welcome collaborations with national government agencies, local government units, the academe, local and international partners, CSOs, homeowners’ associations, etc., in developing and providing a sustainable, safe, and resilient human settlement for the Philippines,” said Dir. Dunstan San Vicente of the Department of Human Settlements and Urban Development.   “We can help other sectors in informing them on how climate change may affect their work and in guiding them in finding solutions. We are looking forward to the successful application and the widespread dissemination and future training on the use of these tools among our local government planners, trainers, academic institutions, and other stakeholders,” said Mr. Albert Magalang of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.   “I'm really happy with this kind of collaborative efforts in these climate models, on how this can be applied locally and how it can be mobilized by the local planners, the MDRRMOs, communities, especially the private sector investors in different systems like agriculture, coastal resource, and the like; fine tuning this information and its implication in terms of what crops they should plant, how should it change their strategies, and how will this affect their livelihood,” said Professor Emma Porio of the Ateneo de Manila University, also a member of the Climate Change Commission (CCC) National Panel of Technical Experts.   “In behalf of local governments, we therefore call our national leaders, and big businesses, to look into the science, innovation, and technology for our coastal and upland areas and the metropolitan cities. Explore opportunities to build the right responses for our communities, be it nature-based solutions or engineering solutions,” said Vice Mayor Alfredo Coro of Del Carmen, Siargao Islands, Surigao del Norte.   The Climate Extremes Report 2020 follows the DOST-PAGASA reports on the observed climate change (2011) and projected mean climate change (2018) in the Philippines.   The launch and webinar is a collaborative effort of Manila Observatory, DOST-PAGASA, Ateneo de Manila University, and CCC.   Watch the replay of the launch through this link: https://www.facebook.com/CCCPhl/videos/928095581173984 or by visiting the Facebook pages of PAGASA, Manila Observatory, or the CCC.
December 06, 2021 Monday