Mga Pilipinang Kampeon ng Resilience, tampok sa Ika-38 na Episode ng seryeng ‘Stories for a Better Normal’
MAYNILA, ika-17 ng  Marso taong 2021 — Alinsunod sa pagdiriwang ng National Women’s Month, pag-uusapan virtually ng mga Pilipinang lider sa usaping climate resilience ang makabagong mga gawain at pagkilos ng mga kababaihan ukol sa disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation, at pati na rin ang national pandemic recovery sa ika-38 na episode ng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” na may temang, “Juana Laban sa Krisis sa Klima at Pandemya: Kaya!”   Sa pangunguna ni dating three-term Senator at ngayo’y Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, mapapanood ang episode na ito ngayong Huwebes ika-18 ng Marso 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live sa facebook.com/CCCPhl at facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Kasama sa online na talakayan ang mga kababaihang kampeon sa larangan ng resilience na sina Atty. Lesley Jeanne Cordero, Senior Disaster Risk Management Specialist ng World Bank;  Ms. Lara Jean Salaysay, isang Climate Reality Leader at Project Development Officer ng Department of Education (DepEd); at si Ms. Louise Mabulo, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Young Champion of the Earth 2019.   Matatandaang sa nakaraang mga episode, pinag-usapan sa online na serye ang sari-saring mga kuwento ng mga mamamayang Pilipino mula sa iba't ibang mga sektor at mga rehiyon sa bansa na patuloy na nakikibaka sa mga epektong dulot ng pandemyang COVID-19  at ng climate crisis.   Para sa episode na ito, bibigyang-diin ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng kaniyang mga panauhin ang ekstraordinaryong papel ng ordinaryong mga Juanas sa ating lipunan sa gitna ng pandemyang COVID-19, para lamang maka-inspire at ma-empower ang ating mga kababaihan, matanda man o bata pa na sila'y maaaring maging mga champions of resilience sa kani-kanilang mga paraan.   “Kapag binibigyang kakayanan natin ang kababaihang siguruhin na kaya nilang 'di lamang makasabay kun'di makaahon sa climate at disaster risks at tuluyan na ring mamuno at maging aktibong mga communicators sa usaping disaster risk reduction at climate change adaptation 'di lang natin mapipigilan na sila'y maging biktima ng mga sakuna, kun'di binibigyang pagkakataon din natin silang maging mga champions of resilience,” pahayag ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, na isang UNISDR Global Champion of Resilience, UNFCCC National Adaptation Plan Champion, at Commissioner of the Global Commission on Adaptation.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan at kamalayang pang-kapaligiran, naglalayon ang "Stories for a Better Normal" na baguhin ang kaisipan ng mga tao, mga pamilya, at mga pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga pamamaraan kung saan maaaring magkaroon tayo at maisasabuhay natin ang isang ‘better normal’ sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.   Na-organisa ang online na talakayang ito mula sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) na binigyang-suporta naman mula sa Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Philippine Commission on Women, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
March 17, 2021 Wednesday
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Filipina Champions of Resilience in 38th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 16 March 2021 — In line with the celebration of the National Women’s Month, Filipina climate resilience leaders will gather virtually to put a spotlight on the innovative work of women in disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation, and in national pandemic recovery on the 38th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic, “Juana Laban sa Krisis sa Klima at Pandemya: Kaya!”   The episode, hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 18 March 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are women champions of resilience, including Atty. Lesley Jeanne Cordero, Senior Disaster Risk Management Specialist of World Bank; Ms. Lara Jean Salaysay, a Climate Reality Leader and Project Development Officer of the Department of Education (DepEd); and Ms. Louise Mabulo, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Young Champion of the Earth 2019.   In previous episodes, the online series featured different stories of Filipino people from various sectors and regions of the country coping up with the impacts of COVID-19 pandemic and climate crisis.   For this episode, Legarda and guests will highlight the extraordinary roles of ordinary Juanas in the society amid the COVID-19 pandemic, to inspire and empower women and girls to be champions of resilience in their own ways.   “When we empower women to ensure that they are able to adapt to climate and disaster risks and be leaders and active communicators in disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation we do not only prevent them from becoming victims of disasters, but we also allow them to be champions of resilience,” said Legarda, who is a UNISDR Global Champion of Resilience, UNFCCC National Adaptation Plan Champion, and Commissioner of the Global Commission on Adaptation.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Philippine Commission on Women, Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation. 
March 16, 2021 Tuesday
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CCC: Time to ban non-essential plastics to reduce GHG emissions, fight climate change
Photo from pexels.com. MANILA, 15 March 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) calls for banning of non-essential and single-use plastics as part of enforcing ambitious targets to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from all sectors. The Commission said that the problem on plastics is not only a waste or pollution issue, but also a climate issue. Plastics become an essential component of products and packaging due to its durability, lightweight, and low cost. Despite its numerous benefits, plastics originate as fossil fuels and emit GHGs which worsens the climate. According to the “Plastic & Climate: The Hidden Costs of a Plastic Planet” released by the Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL), GHGs are emitted at each of the stages of the plastic lifecycle: 1) fossil fuel extraction and transport, 2) plastic refining and manufacture, 3) managing plastic waste, and 4) plastic’s ongoing impact once it reaches oceans, waterways, and landscape. The extraction and transport of fossil fuels to create plastic produces GHG through methane leakage and flaring, fuel combustion and energy consumption in the process of drilling for oil or gas, and through land disturbance when forests and fields are cleared for well pads and pipelines. Even plastic refining also produces emissions. Plastics that are landfilled, recycled, or incinerated also produce emissions. While landfilling plastics emits the least, it, in turn, presents other significant risks, like on health and on the environment. Recycling has moderate emissions. Incineration is the primary driver of emissions from plastic waste management. Unmanaged plastic ends up in the environment, where it continues to have climate impacts as it degrades. Plastics at the ocean’s surface, coastlines, riverbanks, and landscapes continually release methane and other GHGs, and that these emissions increase as plastic breaks down further. Microplastic in the oceans also interfere with the ocean’s capacity to absorb and sequester carbon dioxide. Microscopic plants and animals play a critical role in the biological carbon pump that captures carbon at the ocean’s surface and transports it into the deep oceans, preventing it from re-entering the atmosphere. Around the world, these plankton are being contaminated with microplastic. Plastic pollution reduces the ability of phytoplankton to fix carbon through photosynthesis. It also reduces the metabolic rates, reproductive success, and survival of zooplankton that transfer the carbon to the deep ocean. The report also expressed that the plastic industries’ plans to expand plastic production threaten to exacerbate plastic’s climate impacts and could make limiting global temperature rise to 1.5°C impossible. “If the production, disposal, and incineration of plastic continue on its present growth trajectory, by 2030, these global emissions could reach 1.34 gigatons per year—equivalent to more than 295 five-hundred-megawatt coal plants. By 2050, plastic production and incineration could emit 2.8 gigatons of CO2 per year, releasing as much emissions as 615 five-hundred-megawatt coal plants,” the report stated. To avoid overshooting the 1.5°C target, the report suggested to aggregate global greenhouse emissions within a remaining (and quickly declining) carbon budget of 420–570 gigatons of carbon. “But if the growth in plastic production and incineration continues as predicted, the cumulative greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 will be over 56 gigatons CO2e, or between 10–13 percent of the total remaining carbon budget. By 2100, exceedingly conservative assumptions would result in cumulative carbon emissions from plastic of nearly 260 gigatons, or well over half of the carbon budget,” the report added. With this data, the CCC is highly concerned with the problems of plastic, especially at the local scale. The climate body said that the most effective way to address the plastic crisis is to dramatically reduce the production of unnecessary plastics, beginning with national and global bans on nearly all single-use and disposable ones.
March 15, 2021 Monday
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CCC: Panahon na para ipagbawal ang non-essential plastics nang mabawasan ang GHG emissions, na syang makatutulong magpanalo ng laban natin sa climate change
Larawan mula sa pexels.com. MAYNILA, Ika-15  Marso taong 2021 — Nananawagan ang Climate Change Commission (CCC) para sa tuwirang pagbabawal ng mga non-essential at single-use plastics bilang bahagi ng pagpa-patupad ng ating ambisyosong mga layunin na mabawasan ang greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mula sa lahat ng mga sektor.   Sinabi ng Commission na ang problema natin sa mga plastics ay hindi lamang usapin ng waste or pollution, kundi usapin din ito ng climate. Ang plastics ay naging isa sa napaka-halagang bahagi ng ating mga produkto sa usapin ng packaging dahil sa mga katangiang mayroon ito tulad ng durability, ang pagiging lightweight, at low cost. Sa kabila ng marami nitong mga kapakinabanggan, ang plastics ay nagmumula sa fossil fuels na syang nag-e emit ng GHGs na syang nagpa-palala ng kundisyon ng ating klima.   Ayon sa ulat/pagaaral na “Plastic & Climate: The Hidden Costs of a Plastic Planet” na inilathala Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL), ang GHGs ay na e-emit sa bawat stage ng plastic lifecycle: 1) pagta-tanggal at pagta-transport ng fossil fuel, 2) plastic refining at manufacturing, 3) pamamahala sa mga basurang plastic, at 4) ang patuloy na pinsalang dulot ng plastics kapag humantong na ito sa ating mga karagatan, mga daluyang-tubig, at ang kabuuang kalagayan ng lugar.   Ang extraction at transport ng mga fossil fuels para lamang makagawa ng plastic ay syang nagpo-produce ng GHG sa pamamagitan ng methane leakage at flaring, fuel combustion at energy consumption sa proseso ng paghuhukay natin para sa oil o gas, at sa pamamagitan ng land disturbance kapag ang mga kagubatan at mga kapatagan ay nililinis at pinapatag para lamang makagawa tayo ng well pads at pipelines. Kahit na ang plastic refining ay nakagagawa rin ng mapag-pinsalang mga emissions.   Ang mga plastic na napupunta sa mga landfill, at nare-recycle, o di kaya'y sinusunog ay nakapag-poproduce din ng emissions. Habang nasa proseso tayo ng landfilling ng plastic, nakapag-dudulot din ito ng iba pang napaka-hahalagang mga panganib, tulad ng sa kalusugan at sa kapaligiran. Ang recycling ang syang nakapag-dudulot lamang ng bahagyang mga emissions. Habang ang pagsusunog ay syang pangunahing dahilan ng mapinsalang mga emissions mula sa pamamahala ng mga basurang plastic.   Ang mga plastics na palutang-lutang nalang sa ibabaw ng karagatan, mga baybayin,  mga pampang, at tanawin  ay patuloy na bumubuga o nagpapakawala ng methane at iba pang mga GHGs, at ang mga  emissions na ito ay nadaragdagan habang ang mga plastic ay patuloy na nabubulok.   Ang mga microplastics na nakakalat sa ating mga karagatan ay nakagagambala din sa kakayahan nitong maka-absorb at maka-sequester ng carbon dioxide. Ang microscopic na mga hayop at halaman ay gumaganap ng isang napaka-halagang papel sa loob ng  biological carbon pump na syang humuhuli sa carbon na lumulutang sa ibabaw ng karagatan at dinadala nya ito sa kailaliman ng mga karagatan, ito rin ang pumipigil sa muling pagpasok nito sa ating atmosphere. Sa buong mundo ang mga plankton na ito ay nagiging  contaminated  na nang  mga microplastics na nakakalat at naka tambak lang. Nakakabawas sa kakayahan ng mga phytoplankton na ayusin ang carbon sa pamamagitan ng photosynthesis ang plastic pollution. Nakakabawas din ito sa metabolic rates, reproductive success, at survival ng mga zooplankton na maglipat ng carbon sa kailaliman ng karagatan.   Ipinahiwatig din sa ulat na ang mga industriya ng plastic ay nag abala na palawakin pa ang kanilang produksyon na sya ring nagbabantang makapag-palala pa ng masasamang mga epekto ng plastics sa klima at kung saan maaaring gawing imposible ang layunin nating mapigilan ang pagtaas ng global temperature rise bago pa ito umabot ng 1.5°C.   “Kung ang produksyon, pagtatapon, at pagsusunog ng plastics ay hahayaan na lamang nating mavpatuloy sa kaslukuyan nitong  growth trajectory, pagdating ng taong 2030, ang mga global emissions na ito ay maaaring umabot na sa 1.34 gigatons kada taon—maaaring umabot sa mahigit kumulang na to 295 five-hundred-megawatt coal plants. Pag-abot natin ng taong 2050, ang produksyon ng plastics at pag susunog nito ay maaaring maka- emit 2.8 gigatons ng CO2 kada taon, na naka pag-papawala ng mahigit kumulang na 615 five-hundred-megawatt na bulto at lawak ng emissions na mula sa mga "coal plants", ayon sa naka saad sa ulat.   Para lamang maiwasan ang pag- overshoot natin sa 1.5°C target, iminungkahi ng ulat na pagsama-samahin natin ang nai-ipong global greenhouse emissions sa loob ng natitirang  (quickly declining) at mabilis nang nauubos na carbon budget na  420–570 gigatons.   “Pero kung ang paglago ng plastic production  at pag susunog natin ay mag papatuloy na tulad ng ating inaakala, ang pinag-patong patong na greenhouse gas emissions, ito ngayon ay aabot ng mahigit pa sa 56 gigatons CO2e pag dating ng taon 2050, o mahigit kumulang na  10–13 percent ng kabuuang natitirang carbon budget pag dating ng taon 2100, ang sobrang labis na konserbatibong mga pala-palagay ay mag bubunga ulit ng pinag-patong patong na carbon emissions mula sa plastics na halos umabot na sa  260 gigatons,  o lagpas pa sa kalahati sa carbon budget,”  dagdag pa ng ulat.   Gamit ang data na ito, ang Climate Change Commission ( CCC) ay lubos na nag aalala ukol sa mga problema natin sa plastics, lalung lalo na sa pang-lokal na antas. Sinabi ng climate body na ang pinaka epektibong paraan upang matugunan ang plastic crisis ay ang biglaan at lubusang pag babawas sa produksyon ng mga di kinakailangang o unnecessary plastics, kung saan kinakailangan nating magsimula sa national hanggang umabot tayo sa global bans ng halos lahat ng single-use at disposable plastics.
March 15, 2021 Monday
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"Achieve empowerment for women in the Philippine coffee industry” – Coffee Experts
Robusta coffee trees of Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda in Tagaytay City. Photo from the PowerPoint presentation of the Deputy Speaker during the 37th episode of Stories For A Better Normal. MANILA, 12 March 2021 — Filipina coffee enthusiasts highlighted the state of the local coffee industry in the Philippines and called for increased coffee promotion and production in the 37th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” hosted by three-term Senator, now House Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda. The third part of the resilient livelihoods episode with the topic, “Kwentong Kape ng Kababaihan” featured all-Filipina guests including Pacita “Chit” Juan, co-chair of Philippine Coffee Board, Inc.; Jocelyn Mamar, a coffee farmer; and Rosario Juan, Chief Executive Officer of the Commune Café, in celebration of Women’s Month. “Bakit kape? Ano ang koneksyon niyan sa climate change? Tatlong aspeto ang nakaaapekto sa climate change, at ang climate change ay nakaaapekto sa pang-araw-araw na buhay. Una, urban governance, kung papaano sinusunod ang ating batas. Pangalawa, ecosystems decline, ‘pag kalbo ang bundok at marumi ang lawa at ilog, papaano na tayo? At pangatlo, dito papasok ang kape - rural livelihoods - ang kabuhayan ng mga kababayan sa kanayunan, ang pinagkakakitaan ng ating micro and small enterprises. Papaano na ang coffee farmers, ano ang epekto ng pandemya at papaano tayo makatutulong dito,” said Legarda, who launched a special coffee blend made from Robusta beans, “Lola Mameng’s”, named after her maternal grandmother who planted coffee trees many years ago. The guest coffee connoisseurs have shown and presented the long and meticulous process of coffee-making – from farming and harvesting, drying, milling – up to roasting and serving. They also discussed how the coffee farmers and businesses are coping up with the impacts of a pandemic as well as climate change. "Noong 2002, kami ay nagconduct ng trainings around the country at meron kaming kaakibat na LGU, PGU, or organizations. Ngayon, mayroon kaming project with USAID para sa mga kababaihan sa walong bayan na pinagkukunan ng kape at ginagawaan ng programa para ma-connect ang farmers sa mga buyers. At sa tulong ng Department of Trade and Industry - Export Management Bureau, kami ay nag-present ng green beans at kung papaano ito pwedeng ibenta sa ibang lugar para makilala ang Philippine Coffee. Alam natin na maliit lang ang produksyon nito at dapat bago tayo mag-export, ipakilala natin ang sarap ng Philippine coffee." said Chit. "Ine-encourage talaga namin na magtanim ng kape, at ‘wag gumamit ng synthetic fertilizers. Dapat yung organic lang. Kung ano ‘yung waste natin, ibabalik natin sa farm," said Mamar. “It was really our vision and mission to promote Philippine coffee. Mula pagbukas namin noong 2013, ang ino-offer lang namin na kape ay ang kapeng galing sa Pilipinas. Ang sinasabi ng mga tao ay “Huh? May kape ba tayo?”, ‘yung iba naman “Huh? Masarap ba ‘yung kape natin?” ‘Yun ang naging challenge for us to really show people and let them taste good coffee from the Philippines,” said Rosario. Legarda reiterated the need to establish an inventory of coffee farms all over the Philippines, and also called for increased appreciation and support for the women coffee makers who continuously uplift the coffee culture in the country. “This is not the last for coffee because there’s much to learn and much to do to help our coffee farmers. Hindi po kailangan ng sampung ektarya o magmana ng maliit na lupa. Kahit sampung puno, kayang magtanim ng kape. Dapat nating maitaas ang antas ng kabuhayan ng ating mga kababaihang gumagawa ng kape,” Legarda concluded. As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities. This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Philippine Commission on Women, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
March 12, 2021 Friday
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Cabinet Cluster TWG Convened on Circular Economy, Sustainable Consumption and Production and Addressing Single-Use Plastics
According to Consumers International, 50% of all plastic produced every year are used and then thrown away in just minutes. Photo from the PowerPoint presentation of the Department of Trade and Industry. MANILA, 12 March 2021 — During the 1st Meeting of the Cabinet Cluster on Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation and Disaster Risk Reduction (CCAM-DRR) Technical Working Group (TWG) on Circular Economy, Sustainable Consumption and Production, and Single-Use Plastics, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) recommended that the preferred approach of waste avoidance and reduction include the phasing out of single-use plastics.   “There is broad support for the campaign because we have at least 489 cities, municipalities, and provinces banning and regulating single-use plastics. A national ban is urgent to support our programs on climate-resilient recovery and environmental conservation, and to reduce our country’s growing carbon footprint,” said CCC Commissioner Rachel Herrera.   Government agencies presented ongoing initiatives and studies done with development and private sectors, which was created following the presentation to the Cabinet Cluster of the Resolution “Adopting the Principles of Sustainable Consumption and Production, Towards Regulation and Phaseout of Single-Use Plastics and a Responsible Transition to the Use of Environment-Friendly Products” on January 27, 2021. The meeting was held to align and consolidate sustainability and resilience efforts within the government.   “Indeed, plastic pollution is a public health, waste management, and climate change concern. And this really underscores the urgent need to promote circular economy and sustainable consumption and production in our governance and societal systems,” said Assistant Director Vizminda Osorio of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources - Environment and Management Bureau (DENR-EMB), who chaired the TWG meeting.   “For DENR, strategies and programmatic activities for the prevention, reduction, and management of marine litter have been set. Our overarching goal is to have zero waste in Philippine waters by 2040 through responsibility and accountability,” Dir. Osorio added as she presented the National Plan of Action for the Prevention, Reduction and Management of Marine Litter under their review.   Undersecretary Mercedita Sombilla of the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) said that “the implementation of the national action plan will require multi-stakeholder collaboration, adding that, “There is a need for legislative reforms on food and electronic waste management, extended producer responsibility and sustainable public procurement. Electronic waste is especially relevant with the increased demand for electronics during the pandemic quarantine.”   For Undersecretary Ruth Castelo of the Department of Trade and Industries-Consumer Protection Group (DTI-CPG), making everybody understand the problem of plastic pollution is imperative. “It is the mindset that we need to change. We have expressed that doing away with single-use plastics needs to be included in the Department of Education’s curriculum so we can shape the mindset of young Filipinos. Every member of the community including the youth must do something about plastic waste,” said DTI Usec. Castelo.   The Department of Science and Technology (DOST) also conveyed their support and offered to provide the science and development of technologies. They shared their formation of an Environment Protection Committee and Technical Working Group to provide business management policies relevant to clean businesses. The Office of the Cabinet Secretariat will look into a mechanism to ensure the effective implementation of each agency's plans and programs.   With support from the Department of Finance, experts from the World Bank (WB) were also asked to share their studies on plastic pollution in the Philippines, particularly the Top 10 plastics flowing through the Pasig River, and their insights on the formation of a Roadmap Towards Zero Single-Use Plastics in the country.   “The Philippines is significantly impacted by plastics pollution, but is now starting to take concrete actions to combat it. The Pasig River alone is one of the top 10 plastics polluted rivers in the world and is accompanied by a lot of health issues, repercussions in terms of economic loss,” said the WB Environment, Natural Resources and Blue Economy Global Practice team led by Anjali Acharya and Junu Shrestha.   “Our plastic diagnostics study showed that plastic pollution in different sites along the Pasig River have different compositions. If we were to target reduction policies, having policies targeted on these plastics, we can identify what plastics to focus on,” the team added.   Another upcoming World Bank study on the markets of plastic circularity showed that a striking 79% of all resin materials or recyclable plastic value is lost, highlighting opportunities for creating value from these materials that are normally considered “waste.”   The meeting ended with expressions of support from the different agencies to the proposed Roadmap and an agreement to set technical meetings to further streamline programs, initiatives and advocacy narratives.
March 12, 2021 Friday
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Legarda: Translate national plans, policies into local action to enhance resilience
Photo from the PowerPoint presentation of Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda during the 7th Asia-Pacific Climate Change Adaptation Forum. MANILA, 10 March 2021 — Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda called for greater solidarity, cooperation, and action in enhancing the resilience of the Asia-Pacific region in light of the intensifying effects of the climate crisis and the crippling effects of the COVID-19 pandemic as Keynote Speaker at the Plenary Session on Policy and Climate Governance of the 7th Asia-Pacific Climate Change Adaptation Forum. “The massive scale of the climate crisis has never been more evident than today. We meet today in recognition of a planet that is fast declining, as record highs of 2020 as the warmest year and the period 2011 to 2020 as the warmest decade on record, worsening effects of climate change, and economic shocks from this pandemic set us back to achieve our goals on sustainable and resilient development,” said Legarda, a three-term Senator who is also Global Champion for Resilience of the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction and National Adaptation Plan Champion of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. The weeklong forum aims to exchange good practices of climate governance at the international, regional, and national levels that support adaptation actions towards building the resilience of sectors, including shaping a green recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. The Asia-Pacific region is considered as highly vulnerable to climate and disaster impacts, with the 2019 Asia-Pacific Disaster Report finding that “economic losses due to disasters are larger than previously estimated with most of this additional loss linked to the impact of slow onset disasters in the agricultural sector” and that “multi-hazard average annual loss (AAL) for the region is $675  billion, of which $405 billion, or 60 percent, is drought-related agricultural losses, particularly in rural economies.” Legarda also cited a study from the Asian Development Bank, which said that “even under the Paris consensus scenario in which global warming is limited to 1.5°C to 2°C above preindustrial levels, some of the land area, ecosystems, and socioeconomic sectors will be significantly affected by climate change impacts, to which policymakers and the investment community need to adapt.” The legislator, who is also a Commissioner of the Global Commission on Adaptation, stressed that the Asia-Pacific region could expect prolonged heatwaves, coastal sea-level rise, and changes in rainfall patterns, which could disrupt ecosystem services and lead to severe effects on livelihoods, and in turn, affect human health and migration dynamics, and give rise to potential conflicts. As the author of landmark laws on climate adaptation and mitigation and environmental protection, Legarda said that policies, plans, and programs should be translated into local action with measurable gains through fair and effective enforcement. According to the GCA’s 2019 flagship report, “Adapt Now: A global call for leadership on climate resilience,” adaptation investments were found to consistently deliver high returns, with benefit-cost ratios ranging from 2:1 to 10:1 and "often creates more jobs per dollar spent than more traditional investment, with superior local benefits. Legarda also noted that in the recent Climate Adaptation Summit, governments and businesses committed to bring climate finance to 50% adaptation from being skewed in favor of mitigation, and addressed the problem that only 10% of climate finance actually reaches local communities. With this, Legarda underscored the need to promote the principles of “locally-led adaptation” where frontline vulnerable populations must have a voice and role in shaping the recovery in every key sector and system. “The response must address underlying inequities in society affecting the capacity of local actors to adapt even as they stand on the frontlines of climate change, including marginalized communities, indigenous peoples, women and children, and youth. Local planning and investments can help ensure that the best information is shared, resources are made available, and the best policies are enacted,” Legarda added. In line with the GCA's "locally-led adaptation" principles, Legarda urged policymakers and leaders to: (1) expand financial resources available to local governments and community-based organizations; (2) facilitate efficient access to international and domestic climate finance and the transfer of technology and knowledge on adaptation and mitigation; (3) adopt nature-based solutions, such as wetlands restoration for water storage and soil moisture, reconnecting rivers to floodplains, planting mangroves to protect from coastal flooding, and increasing green urban spaces; and (4) invest in social preparation for the transformation of all sectors towards low carbon development and a green economy, and the sustained implementation and monitoring of outcomes of national climate plans. “Considering that ecosystems contribute at least 30% of climate solutions, mainstreaming biodiversity conservation and nature-based solutions should be at the very heart of discourse, planning, and implementation of climate action, with cross-sectoral, cross-pillar, and multi-stakeholder engagement as its foundation,” Legarda added. Lastly, Legarda emphasized the need to implement science-based global, national, and local action plans and policies to identify specific risks and vulnerabilities. “As leaders, policymakers, planners, and implementers in our respective fields, let us give our region and the world the best fighting chance to bounce back better from this pandemic, ready and braced to cope with and to overcome the climate crisis.” “Through this summit and beyond, let us learn from another, support each other’s adaptation and mitigation actions, advise on strategies, and strike convergence where possible. The Philippines looks forward and stands ready for more meaningful regional partnerships and initiatives that we could scale up at the global level,” Legarda concluded. The 7th Asia-Pacific Climate Change Adaptation Forum is being held virtually from March 8-12, hosted by Japan's Ministry of the Environment together with the APAN Secretariat at the UN Environment Programme. Resilience as the unifying theme of the event is structured around four thematic “streams”: (i) inclusive resilience (ii) nature-based resilience, (iii) economic sector resilience, and (iv) communities and local resilience. Join in the week-long Forum by registering through this link: https://bit.ly/2YE3Fbt
March 10, 2021 Wednesday
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Filipino Women in Coffee Industry in 37th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 9 March 2021 — Women coffee enthusiasts will gather virtually to share knowledge on the coffee industry – farming,  processing, retail, and marketing – and its challenges and opportunities in the new normal on the 37th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic “Kwentong Kape ng mga Kababaihan.” This is a third of the four-part episode which focuses on supporting resilient livelihoods.   The episode, hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 11 March 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are Filipina coffee connoisseurs, including Pacita “Chit” Juan, Co-chair of Philippine Coffee Board, Inc.; Jocelyn Mamar, a coffee farmer; and Rosario Juan, Chief Executive Officer of the Commune Café.   In previous episodes, the online series tackled the role of traditional weaving and pottery industry in providing environmentally-sustainable and viable livelihood options to communities, while preserving cultural heritage and local craftspersonship.   In this episode, Legarda and guests will call on the families, local governments and the general public to support small-scale coffee farmers and keep the local coffee industry alive, and to encourage the youth to spur coffee bean production for future generations.   The legislator will also launch during this episode a special coffee blend made from Robusta coffee named Lola Mameng’s, after her maternal grandmother who planted the coffee trees many years ago.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
March 09, 2021 Tuesday
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CCC on International Women’s Day: Choose to challenge and shake gender barriers of all forms
MANILA, 8 March 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) calls on the public to build a more gender-equal world in celebration of International Women’s Day.   Celebrated annually during March 8, International Women's Day offers an opportunity to reflect on progress made, to call for change and to celebrate acts of courage and determination by ordinary women who have played an extraordinary role in their communities. The Day also marks a call to action to accelerate gender equality.   With the theme, “ChoosetoChallenge,” this year’s celebration aims to challenge and seek out inequality, and celebrate the efforts of women and girls around the world in shaping a more equal future and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.   Women’s full and equal participation in all facets of society is a fundamental human right. Yet, around the world, from politics to entertainment to the workplace, women and girls are largely underrepresented.   Especially at this time, women mostly stand at the front lines of the COVID-19 crisis, as health care workers, caregivers, innovators, community organizers and as some of the most exemplary and effective national leaders in combating the pandemic. The crisis has highlighted both the centrality of their contributions and the disproportionate burdens that women carry.   On a positive note, the Philippines remains one of the top countries in terms of closing the gender gap, according to the Global Gender Gap Report 2020 of the World Economic Forum.   The report shows that the Philippines has closed 78% of its overall gender gap, garnering a score of 0.781. With this, it ranked 16th out of 153 countries with the narrowest gap between men and women.   The CCC urges to seek out and celebrate achievements of both men and women, big or small, and collectively help create an inclusive world for all. Diversity must be integrated into the formulation and implementation of policies and programs in all spheres and at all stages of pandemic response and recovery.   The Commission also noted that building a sustainable future for all means leaving no one behind - including women and girls. They must be heard, valued and celebrated throughout society to reflect their perspectives and choices for their future and that of the advancement of humanity.
March 08, 2021 Monday
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“Capacitate culture-based livelihoods, MSMEs for inclusive, sustainable growth” – Ceramicists, Brickmakers
Ms. Siegrid Bangyay, a ceramic artist from Sagada, Mountain Province demonstrated how to make pots and ceramics. Photo from the Powerpoint presentation of Ms. Bangyay. MANILA, 5 March 2021 — Ceramicists and brickmakers call for more capacity-building initiatives to enrich culture-based livelihoods in the 36th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” hosted by three-term Senator, now House Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda. The second part of the resilient livelihoods episode with the topic, “Pottery: Continuity and Change” gathered potters, brickmakers, and representatives from the government and academe and showcased various traditional crafts and masterpieces made of clay from the different regions in the Philippines. Sheryl Ebon-Martinez, a ceramicist from Oryoqi Handmade Pottery; Siegrid Bangyay, a ceramic artist from Sagada, Mountain Province; Alvin Obrique, a pottery maker from Sibalom, Antique; and Anacleto Amar, a brickmaker from Tibiao, Antique; Nelia Elisa Florendo, chief of Industrial Technology Development Institute of the Department of Science and Technology; Rosaly Jean Resolute, Business Counselor from Negosyo Center of the Department of Trade and Industry; and Elsie Marie Carloto, a ceramic teacher and researcher at the University of Antique were this episode’s guests. “In this era of climate change, apektado ang ating mga trabaho sa probinsya, sa rural areas, sa kanayunan...And we are going back to basics, using the wealth of our soil and our land sustainably for resilient rural livelihoods,” said Legarda. The guest ceramicists showed and demonstrated their creations and products such as terracotta bricks, huge and complex ornamental jars, mini cooking sets, flower pots, and others. "Noong 2018 o 2019, nagre-rent lang ako ng kiln noong time na ‘yon, then it made me realize na this is something that I can do in the long-term. And in January 2020, I had a kiln built in my house in Quezon City. Then nagkaroon ng pandemic, we couldn’t go out, we couldn’t go anywhere, so I spent a lot of time practicing and making teawares. It was both a blessing and challenging, pero yung time na naka lockdown ako, it made me a lot of leeway to experiment and to get all the creative ideas into the stuff that I was making," said Sheryl Ebon-Martinez. "In order to get the right quality of clay, there’s a lot of processes and a lot of people involved in order to finish a product. Also, there’s a lot of collaboration with other local people with my products, because I incorporate local designs and I work with rattan weavers here in order to get that right quality of material that we need," said Siegrid Bangyay. “Noong nakita ng Resource Management Program na ang lupa ay maganda pala na gawing earthenware, nag-umpisa nang ma-enhance ‘yung pottery at bricks making projects. May naging tulong din ang local government unit at ang Department of Trade and Industry regarding sa pagpapaganda ng mga [produkto] namin,” said Anacleto Amar. "May ginawa kaming training noong December, nag-train kami ng molding gamit ang plaster of paris at nakagawa ng bricks dahil sa tulong na brick molder, nakapag produce din kami ng maraming pots dahil sa jiggering machine. Noon, gumagawa lang kami ng clay pots na manu-mano at tinatapakan, ngayon malaking tulong ang machines dahil hindi na namin kailangan mag-exert ng effort, kaya napapadali ang paggawa namin," said Alvin Obrique. Meanwhile, the representatives from the government underscored the importance of protecting and preserving culture-based livelihoods which not only provide income to the local communities, but also preserve the cultural heritage of the country. “Ang purpose ng DTI ay makatulong sa pag-increase ng income ng ating mga pottery at brickmakers, at ma-improve natin ang quality ng kanilang mga produkto,” said Rosaly Jean Resolute. "In the early 80s, we even proceeded with our research and development on ceramic whiteware production. Kasi nag-boom ang industries late 80s towards the 90s, kung saan nag-eexport tayo ng ceramic whitewares natin. But unfortunately, yung competition in terms of cost, doon tayo medyo nahirapan and it leaves us with one opportunity, yung ating terracotta industry. Dahil nandito yung strength natin because we have a lot of red clay and of course lalo pa nating napatunayan ngayon ang dami nating skilled workers and entrepreneurs, who are into ceramics," said Nelia Elisa Florendo. "Ang mga faculty and staff ng University of Antique ang nate-train po at marami kaming ginagawa na mga sari-saring pots gamit ang jiggering. Sa ngayon, ini-enhance pa rin namin ang mga skills ng mga potters in line sa mga techniques in design sa pottery production," said Elsie Marie Carloto. As a long time advocate of cultural heritage and Micro, Small, and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs), Legarda emphasized the need to capacitate MSMEs, including culture-based livelihoods, as part of the overall strategy on economic development, providing opportunities for support and growth, and ensuring that their special needs are addressed. “Let's reach out to as many barangays and communities as possible lalo na yung mga walang trabaho para ma-train para gumawa ng pottery. Let's improve the designs and tumulong tayo sa marketing through online selling and exhibits,” said Legarda.   “Inclusivity – this means our role is to help uplift the lives of all our people. So we must bring the technology to provinces and academe to embed it in barangays so that even the poorest can have access and be empowered for their micro-enterprises,” Legarda concluded. As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities. This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
March 05, 2021 Friday
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Public Advisory of the Climate Change Commission on the reported misrepresentation of the agency related to agricultural loans
In light of the recent report regarding false representation and the unauthorized use of the CCC logo in spurious documents, the CCC wishes to inform the general public that it has not given permission to any private individual to use its logo nor has it given authority to any person to conduct any kind of transaction relating to agricultural loans. Please be informed that the CCC does not have any program/activity relating to agricultural loans. Those behind these fraudulent transactions are posing as CCC personnel in an attempt to obtain money from unsuspecting persons. We urge the public to be wary of these transactions and to verify first and report any incident to CCC via the Legal Services Division at email lsd@climate.gov.ph. The CCC also hereby issues a warning to the individual/s behind the said fraudulent transaction that unauthorized use of the CCC logo and the conduct of false representation constitute a violation of applicable laws and that the CCC will not hesitate to take necessary legal action to address the matter.
March 03, 2021 Wednesday
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Message for the World Wildlife Day
 
March 03, 2021 Wednesday
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Mga Negosyo sa Paggawa ng mga Palayok at Laryo sa Ika-36 na Episode ng Seryeng ‘Stories for a Better Normal’
MAYNILA, ika-03 ng Marso taong 2021 — Pag-uusapan online ang tradisyonal na mga gawang-sining ng pagpapalayok (brickmaking) at paglalaryo (pottery) kasama ang ilan sa mga mahuhusay na Pilipinong taga-gawa kung saan kanila ring ibabahagi ang kani-kanilang mga obra-maestra nang sa gayo'y makabuo at makakuha ng mas malawakang suporta mula sa publiko para sa industriya. Ito at iba pang mga culture-based livelihood ay ipapalabas sa ika-36 na episode ng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” na may temang “Pottery at Brickmaking Enterprises.” Ito ang pangalawa mula sa maka-apat na episode na nagbibigay-tuon sa pagsuporta sa pagpapatatag ng nasabing pangkabuhayan.   Sa pangunguna ni dating three-term Senator at ngayo’y Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, mapapanood ang episode na ito ngayong Huwebes ika-04 ng Marso 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live sa facebook.com/CCCPhl at facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Kabilang sa online na talakayan ang mga taga-gawa ng palayok at laryo o clay mula sa iba't ibang lugar sa bansa, tulad nina Sheryl Ebon-Martinez, ceramicist mula sa Oryoqi Handmade Pottery; Siegrid Bang yay, ceramic artist mula sa Sagada, Mountain Province; Alvin Obrique, pottery maker mula sa Sibalom, Antique; at Anacleto Amar, brickmaker mula Tibiao, Antique. At sasamahan din sila nina Nelia Elisa Florendo, tagapamuno ng Industrial Technology Development Institute ng Department of Science and Technology; Rosaly Jean Resolute, Business Counsellor mula sa Negosyo Center ng Department of Trade and Industry; at Elsie Marie Carloto, ceramic teacher-researcher mula sa University of Antique.   Matatandaang sa nakaraang mga episode, tinalakay sa online serye ang papel ng industriya ng traditional weaving, handicrafts, at embroidery sa pagbibigay ng mga pagkakataong magkaroon ng sustenableng maka-kapaligiran na pagkakakitaang pangkabuhayan habang pinapangalagaan ang pamanang pang-kultura at lokal na maka-manlilikhang sining.   Samantala, para naman sa episode na ito, hihingin ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng kaniyang mga panauhin ang suporta ng mga pamilya, lokal na pamahalaan, kasama na ng publiko, upang maprotektahan ang mga culture-based livelihood na hindi lamang nakapagbibigay kita sa lokal nating mga pamayanan ngunit nakatutulong din sa pagpapanatili ng pamanang kultura ng bansa.   “Sa pamamagitan ng culture-based livelihood tulad ng pottery at brickmaking, nakapagbibigay tayo sa ating mga kababayan ng maaaring pagkakitaan at kasabay na rin dito naka-aambag tayo sa pangangalaga ng ating pamanang kultura. Nagkakaroon naman ng mas matibay na kamalayang pagmamay-ari ang komunidad dahil sa minana nilang mga tradisyon mula sa kanilang mga ninuno. Sa pamamagitan ng episode na ito, inaasahan naming mas mapalago ang kahiligan ng mga manonood sa tradisyonal na mga kasanayan at maipakita ang pang-ekonomiyang mga pagkakataon na maaaring makuha mula sa pagkatuto o pagiging mahusay sa naturang kasanayan," pahayag ni House Deputy Speaker at Antique Representative Loren Legarda.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan at kamalayang pang-kapaligiran, naglalayon ang "Stories for a Better Normal" na baguhin ang kaisipan ng mga tao, mga pamilya, at mga pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga pamamaraan kung saan maaaring magkaroon tayo at maisasabuhay natin ang isang ‘better normal’ sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.   Na-organisa ang online na talakayang ito mula sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission (CCC) na binigyang-suporta naman ng Institute for Climate at Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, at ng Mother Earth Foundation. 
March 03, 2021 Wednesday
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CCC on World Wildlife Day: Preserve forests to sustain protect wildlife, livelihoods of indigenous communities
Mt. Hamiguitan Range Wildlife Sanctuary, an ASEAN Heritage Park and UNESCO World Heritage Site in Mindanao, is the largest natural pygmy forest in the country and is home to the hundreds of threatened and endemic flora and fauna species. Photo from the Facebook Page of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources Davao. MANILA, 3 March 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) calls for the conservation of forests and forest-dwelling species of wild fauna and flora, in celebration of World Wildlife Day today.   The UN General Assembly proclaimed March 3 of every year as World Wildlife Day through Resolution 68/205, which aims to raise public awareness on the intrinsic value of wildlife and its various contributions, including its ecological, genetic, social, economic, scientific, educational, cultural, recreational, and aesthetic contributions to sustainable development and human well-being.   This year’s theme, "Forests and Livelihoods: Sustaining People and Planet", seeks to shed light on the links between the state of forests and woodlands and the preservation of the millions of livelihoods that depend directly on them, with particular attention to the traditional knowledge of the communities that have managed forest ecosystems and wildlife for centuries.   The Day also aims to drive discussions towards establishing a sustainable model of interaction between humanity and one of its most important natural providers, in line with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including Goal 1 (No Poverty), Goal 2 (Zero hunger), Goal 12 (Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns), Goal 13 (Climate Action)  and Goal 15 (Life on Land).   Forests are home to the world’s biodiversity and regulate key aspects of the global carbon cycle. Forests also provide essential livelihoods and environmental services. In the absence of other options for employment and income, communities, particularly in rural areas, depend on forests as their natural resource for daily needs like food, shelter, energy, and medicines.   The Commission also calls on every Filipino to undertake simple, doable steps such as saving and recycling paper, buying sustainable products, condemning wildlife trade, and promoting biodiversity, while being advocates themselves to be part of the solution to protect forests and nature. But despite the increase in the protected area coverage across the globe, natural tropical forests are still declining due to deforestation which threatens animal and plant biodiversity, water and air quality, the livelihoods, and food security of forest-dependent communities that are among the poorest and most vulnerable.   Through the years, changes in agricultural practices have encroached on wildlife habitats and increased wildlife-human interactions; climate change has affected the habitat of both people and animals, and disasters have increased. COVID-19 emerged from wild animals to affect humans, creating the deadly pandemic that has lasted for more than a year now.    Through this celebration, the CCC calls on all national and local government agencies, multi sectoral stakeholders, and communities to raise awareness on the importance of the forests.
March 03, 2021 Wednesday
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Climate body: Ban on single-use plastics needed to achieve “1.5 °C world,” reduce carbon footprint
An approximately four-hectare open dumpsite in Barangay San Nicolas, Sta. Ana, Pampanga was closed by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources on February 5, 2021 for violating the RA 9003 or the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000 and the RA 8749 or the Clean Air Act of 1999. Photo from the Facebook page of DENR. MANILA, 2 March 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) emphasized the need for a single-use plastics ban if the world is to remain within the 1.5° Celsius limit and prevent the worst of climate change impacts as a Technical Working Group of the House of Representatives Committee on Ecology chaired by Rep. Francisco "Kiko" Benitez moves to consolidate and finalize bills seeking to phase-out or regulate single-use plastics. The CCC, led by its Chairperson-designate Finance Secretary Carlos G. Dominguez, has said that it is aligned with the aims of the bill “to advance realistic solutions to address the challenge of single-use plastics pollution and provide a clear pathway for the pursuit of sustainable consumption and production.” In its submission to the Committee, the CCC said that “a single-use plastics ban is a necessary key step towards achieving a '1.5°C world.' This is the global warming threshold at which vulnerable countries like the Philippines can survive climate impacts. The proposed measure will help create a fundamental shift in the way we deliver on socioeconomic needs, whereby we can promote a cleaner environment, reduce flooding as we are a typhoon-prone country, and mitigate carbon emissions from plastics production." A Roadmap for Sustainability on Single-Use Plastics by the United Nations Environment Programme warns that the world’s capacity to cope with plastic waste has already been overwhelmed. With only 9% of the world’s plastic waste being recycled and the rest ending up in landfills, dumps, or in the environment, the report estimates that there will be 12 billion tons of plastic litter in landfills and the environment by 2050. Aside from the environmental impact, the UN also warns of the numerous health problems and vast economic damage caused by plastic waste. On Monday, the House TWG on its fourth meeting completed a run-through of its draft bill with stakeholders from industry, environmental groups and experts, academia, government, and civil society. Among the provisions discussed during the meeting was the proposed provision on Extended Producers' Responsibility or EPR authored by Deputy Speaker Rufus Rodriguez, which will hold producers responsible for collecting and recycling the amount of plastic that they produce and introduce into the market. “Mandatory EPR will be complementary to a ban on single use plastics as a long-term regulatory measure. It will reduce the amount of packaging lingering in the environment, foster business responsibility, and stimulate the recycling sector, as found in the UN report," the CCC said. The fourth TWG meeting also touched on other solutions needed to solve the problem of plastic waste, including the need to improve solid waste management, invest in the country’s recycling infrastructure, and intervene in e-commerce especially as the lockdowns due to the pandemic are seen to increase the use of unnecessary plastic. “It requires more than a single type of solution. This is such a comprehensive and lifestyle issue that is a consequence of our own industrial processes for the last 200 years,” said Rep. Benitez. UN Environment’s roadmap similarly notes a broad range of actions that must be taken by stakeholders beyond bans and levies on single-use plastics, including the need to improve waste management practices; provide financial incentives to change the habits of consumers, retailers, and manufacturers; accelerate a more circular model of plastics design and production; finance research and the development of alternative materials; and raise awareness. “A national law regulating single-use plastics will serve as an overarching framework and a unified policy to strengthen the impact of existing local ordinances that currently ban or regulate single-use plastics across an estimated 480 provinces, cities, and municipalities,” the CCC noted.
March 02, 2021 Tuesday
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Pottery and Brickmaking Enterprises in 36th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 2 March 2021 — Filipino brick and pottery makers will gather virtually to share knowledge on the traditional crafts and masterpieces made of clay, and to generate broader public support to the pottery and brickmaking industry and other culture-based livelihoods on the 36th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic “Pottery and Brickmaking Enterprises.” This is the second of the four-part episode which focuses on promoting resilient livelihoods.   The episode, hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 4 March 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda.   Joining the online conversation are potters and brickmakers from the various areas in the country, including Sheryl Ebon-Martinez, a ceramicist from Oryoqi Handmade Pottery; Siegrid Bangyay, a ceramic artist from Sagada, Mountain Province; Alvin Obrique, pottery maker from Sibalom, Antique; and Anacleto Amar, brickmaker from Tibiao, Antique. They will also be joined by Nelia Elisa Florendo, chief of Industrial Technology Development Institute of the Department of Science and Technology; Rosaly Jean Resolute, Business Counsellor from Negosyo Center of the Department of Trade and Industry; and Elsie Marie Carloto, a ceramic teacher and researcher at the University of Antique.   In previous episodes, the online series tackled the role of traditional weaving, handicrafts, and embroidery industry in providing environmentally-sustainable and viable livelihood options to communities, while preserving cultural heritage and local craftspersonship.   In this episode, Legarda and guests will call on the families, local governments and the general public to support and protect the culture-based livelihoods which not only provide income to the local communities, but also preserve the cultural heritage of the country.   “Through culture-based livelihood like pottery and brickmaking, we provide our people sources of income and at the same time contribute to preserving our cultural heritage. There is also a stronger sense of ownership by the community because they inherited these traditions from their ancestors. Through this episode, we hope to develop among our viewers the interest in traditional skills and present the economic opportunities that can be derived from acquiring or improving on such skills,” said Legarda.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
March 02, 2021 Tuesday
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CCC joins celebration of National Women’s Month; highlights importance of breaking gender barriers for inclusive development
(From left to right) CCC Commissioner Rachel Anne S. Herrera, DENR Undersecretaries Juan Miguel T. Cuna and Analiza Rebuelta-Teh, and DENR Climate Change Service Director Elenida Basug during the opening of the National Women’s Month celebration held today by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. MANILA, 1 March 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) joins the country in celebration of National Women’s Month this March. Anchored on the theme, “Women can make change amidst the climate crisis and COVID-19,” the month-long celebration aims to highlight the empowerment of women as active contributors to and claimholders of climate-resilient  development. This year’s observance highlights women’s participation in battling the COVID-19 pandemic and climate crisis, as well as discusses gender issues exacerbated by these crises. “The Climate Change Commission wholeheartedly adopts this year's theme as a good reminder and a timely call to action: "Na laban sa krisis sa klima at pandemya, kaya ni Juana". A more gender-equitable world is a safer and greener world. As the United Nations reminds us with this global celebration, achieving gender equality is an enabler not just for climate action, but all the other SDGs,”  said Climate Change Commissioner Rachel Herrera in her message for the opening program of the National Women’s Month celebration of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources Monday. Women commonly face higher risks and greater burdens from the impacts of climate change and the pandemic in situations of poverty. Moreover, women’s unequal participation in decision-making processes compound inequalities and often prevent women from fully contributing to planning, policy-making and implementation. In her message, Herrera also highlighted the role of gender equality in driving progress on climate and sustainability, and outlined three key areas of action to achieve this: ensuring the equal participation of women, ensuring enablers for laws and policies promoting gender equality in terms of financial resources and capacity, and strengthening convergence among bodies working on climate and gender. “I’d like to point out that there is mounting evidence of the link between gender equality and environmental outcomes. May mga studies na po na (there are already studies that show) that when gender inequality is high, we expect higher environmental degradation.” The program also saw the launch of Mga Kwentong KLIMA-likasan Tungo sa Katatagan: A Recognition Awards on Climate and Disaster Resiliency, led by the DENR Gender Development Office and Climate Change Service. The competition, which will run from March to May 2021, aims to showcase the important contributions and initiatives of men and women working on the environment, climate change, and disaster risk reduction sectors. “Pagka pinapakita ang climate change, ang tungkol sa kababaihan, parang laging gloomy. So gusto po nating baguhin ‘yung narrative (When we talk about climate change and women, it always seems to be gloomy. We want to change the narrative),” said Atty. Analiza Rebuelta-Teh, Undersecretary for Finance, Information System, and Climate Change, and Chairperson of the DENR National Gender and Development Focal Point System. “We want to participate in the global good stories movement. In this movement, we share the common belief that we can change the story of the world by changing the storyline,” Teh said. “We aim to spot and highlight the good stories and in doing so, encourage more to pursue good stories of behavior change in the environment, care for the Earth, and addressing impacts of climate change in their communities,” she added. “We know there are pockets of good stories and narratives at different levels. As we seek them out, let’s document them, let’s publicize them, and let’s create more ripples of hope,” she emphasized. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) recognizes the critical role of women in response to climate change due to their local knowledge of and leadership in areas like sustainable resource management or leading sustainable practices at the household and community level. Women’s participation at the political level has resulted in greater responsiveness to citizen’s needs, often increasing cooperation across party and ethnic lines and delivering more sustainable peace. At the local level, women’s inclusion at the leadership level has led to improved outcomes of climate-related projects and policies. Likewise, if policies or projects are implemented without women’s meaningful participation, it can increase existing inequalities and decrease effectiveness. March of every year is declared as National Women’s Month through the following issuances: Proclamation No. 227 s.1998 provides for the observance of the month of March as Women’s Role in History Month; Republic Act 6949 s.1990 declares March 8 of every year as International Women’s Day; and Proclamation No. 224 s.1988 declaring the first week of March each year as Women’s Week and March 8 as Women’s Rights and International Peace Day. Through this celebration, the CCC calls on the Filipinos to find innovative ways of reimagining and rebuilding systems that work for everyone, regardless of gender and age, in pursuit of sustainable and inclusive development.
March 01, 2021 Monday
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Climate Defenders highlight important interventions for global climate conference
Cohort of climate defenders during a meeting convened by the British Embassy in Manila in preparation for the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference. Photo released by British Embassy Manila. MANILA, 26 February 2021 — Some of the country’s top ‘Climate Defenders’ attended recently a meeting convened by the British Embassy in Manila in preparation for the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference or COP26 in November this year. Among those at the meeting hosted by British Ambassador Daniel Pruce were three-term Senator and now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas Governor Benjamin Diokno represented by Managing Director Lyn Javier, ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity Executive Director Theresa Mundita Lim, Oscar M. Lopez Center Executive Director and leading climate scientist Dr. Rodel Lasco, DREAM founder and renewable energy policy expert Atty. Jay Layug, and journalist and youth leader Atom Araullo. During the meeting, Legarda outlined the interventions needed in the Philippines’ climate movement. “As our greenhouse gas emissions are likely to rise without interventions, we will pursue our goal to steer our critical sectors towards green growth and resilience,” Legarda said. “We will continue to identify, fund, and implement our country’s adaptation priorities,” she said. But Legarda also stressed the need for continued initiatives to mainstream science in policy, and for more urgent collective action across all sectors. “We need to make climate science and research work for us, to make them more understandable, relatable, and actionable especially for our local governments and communities,” Legarda pointed out. Ambassador Pruce cited the breadth of issues to be discussed at the climate conference, most importantly on decarbonization and clean energy, green finance, nature-based solutions, and the need to ensure broader participation where every citizen can be engaged. He stressed the important role of the Climate Defenders or tagapagtanggol as local thought leaders, voices, and faces that attest to the urgency of climate change and call for mobilization of bold and meaningful actions. Dr. Lim called for more investments on natural solutions to climate impacts as a path to building resilient communities. “The inextricable connection among nature, human health, and economic development is no longer a question. It needs to be at the center of our development processes – from addressing health and climate crisis, to establishing recovery paths and building resilience for the future. Since climate change and pandemics affect everyone in the globe, our actions must also cut across disciplines and sectors,” Lim said. Dr. Lasco, a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, pointed out that “climate change action is for us, our children, and our future generation. The challenge is to act now.” For Araullo, who has presented award-winning documentaries from climate-related disasters, the youth must be given space to engage, so that their energy and passion can fuel climate actions as they have the most at stake in the climate crisis. Legarda also reiterated the importance of the upcoming conference, and expressed hope that the UK’s leadership can amplify developing countries’ initiatives in pursuit of climate justice, which she also mentioned in a recent meeting with MP Anne-Marie Trevelyan, Minister for Business, Energy and Clean Growth and UK’s Adaptation and Resilience Champion. “COP26 will be a defining moment for the global community as it marks the start of the full implementation of the Paris Agreement to keep us on track on the 1.5ºC climate pathway before we miss to achieve this goal at the end of this decade. A number of climate change impacts could still be avoided by limiting global warming to 1.5ºC compared to 2ºC above pre-industrial levels by 2100. But if we do business-as-usual, warming is projected to reach 3ºC to 4ºC, which will mean massive coral bleaching, rising sea levels, and more intense typhoons,” she stressed. “The UK COP Presidency must be able to amplify and support the agenda of vulnerable developing nations, such as addressing loss and damage and accelerating finance flows, technology transfer, and capacity development—all in the name of climate justice,” Legarda noted. “We need convergence from all of us, from all sectors and stakeholders. We need to be constantly finding new solutions and approaches. We need to empower our youth by providing them space to decide and take meaningful action,” she added. “And we need a greater sense of urgency because time is running out. The pandemic has already caused a significant delay to our climate movement, and we cannot afford to lose any more time,” she emphasized. Legarda similarly pressed for urgent climate action during the Climate Adaptation Summit last month, where she emphasized the importance of accelerating efforts and investments in adaptation in promoting sustainable recovery from the pandemic.  “We need to make up for delays and lost time on our global pace on climate action due to COVID-19 and actually recognize the opportunity of pursuing climate resilience, as we promote a sustainable pandemic recovery,” said Legarda, who was a resource speaker for the summit organized by the Global Commission on Adaptation. Legarda is also one of the over 30 Commissioners across 20 convening countries of the Commission, which aims to inspire heads of state, government officials, community leaders, business executives, investors, and other international actors to prepare for and respond to the disruptive effects of climate change. “Economic disruptions and public health emergencies will happen again if we don’t consider and address the climate crisis as a much bigger threat than COVID-19,” she warned. According to Legarda, this becomes even more urgent because of the looming 2030 deadline, which “scientists have declared as the closing of the window of opportunity to deflect the catastrophic effects of climate change.” “When we say adaptation, we know that it’s really a matter of life and death. It means being able to protect our people and their means to live and prosper, and to transform our societies so they are better equipped to deal with the increasing risks and challenges from climate change,” she explained. Citing a report from the Commission, Legarda warned that without adaptation, “500 million small farms around the world will be most affected by decreased yields, 3.6 to more than 5 billion people may lack sufficient water, hundreds of million people could be displaced, and more than 100 million people in developing countries could be pushed below the poverty line.” “We need to continue rallying behind the science and amplify the voices of our youth and the vulnerable. We need to continue engaging governments, the private sector, and the civil society and to actually work together on how we could further adapt our world within this crucial decade and beyond,” Legarda concluded.
February 26, 2021 Friday
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Legarda, Experts Call for Science-based Governance as PH makes Headway in Climate Action but fails in other SDGs
Photo from the presentation of Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda. MANILA, 23 February 2021 — House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, speaking at the first session of the Future Earth Philippines Regional Workshop for Visayas today, called for stronger science-based governance as the Philippines remains on track in Climate Action under Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 13, but could be failing in its pursuit of other SDGs. “We need to undertake science-based and risk-informed action and investment planning. This is crucial for all our local government units (LGUs) that are at the forefront of the preparation and implementation of local climate action plans. They must be able to know their specific climate risks and vulnerabilities, as a way to inform their actions, policies, and investments within their jurisdictions,” Legarda said. “We have always considered that adaptation is local, recognizing that our communities bear the brunt of climate impacts and therefore our local leaders must be able to address their risks and vulnerabilities specific to their area, as effectively as possible,” Legarda added. National Scientist Dr. Lourdes J. Cruz of the National Academy of Science and Technology (NAST), during her presentation on the Future Earth Philippines Program (FEPP), cited a report by the Footprint Network which showed that the Philippines has been running on an “ecological deficit for the past half-century.” “From the 1960s to 2016, there is a continuous decrease in the biocapacity of the Philippines. From about one global hectare per person we are now down to 0.5. Nangalahati na ang ating biocapacity since 1960 [Our biocapacity has halved since 1960],” Dr. Cruz noted. Biocapacity is the ability ecosystems to provide natural resources and absorb the waste produced by humans. “Our footprint, which is how much we disturb the environment, has gone from 1 to 1.3 global hectares. So from the period where we had a more or less balanced biocapacity and ecological footprint, we are now in an ecological deficit with a -0.8 global hectares per person deficit,” she added. Dr. Cruz highlighted the FEPP’s goal to provide scientific and social bases for policies and strengthen citizen action and stakeholder participation. She presented data from the Sustainable Development Report, noting that the country is on track to achieve only two of the 17 SDGs: Climate Action and Poverty. At the same time, it is ranked “stagnating” in six goals, and “decreasing” in two others. The Philippines scored 65.5 in the Report, ranking 99 out of 166 countries. “We are on track to attaining the 2030 SDGs with respect to No Poverty and Climate Action, but we know very well that although overall our poverty level has gone down, there’s a big disparity in terms of poverty because some provinces and some regions are extremely poor, particularly BARMM and Eastern Visayas, whereas others are doing well,” she added. “But if you look at Quality Education and Life on Land, bagsak tayo dito [we are failing]. We are really decreasing in our ability to attain the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. And with the others, we are improving, but not at a rate that is enough to reach the goal by 2030. For us to be resilient, we have to attain or at least approach the Sustainable Development Goals because sustainability and resilience are closely interlinked,” Dr. Cruz emphasized. As a champion for resilience, Legarda also emphasized the importance of translating knowledge into action during her keynote speech—bringing science into local government interventions, and bringing research to the level of the barangay. “If only all the 1,600 or more local governments, whether cities or municipalities, would do their city and municipal planning based on science and resilience, and disaster risk reduction and climate adaptation and mitigation, and if all our scientists would share and operationalize and explain up to the barangay level the importance of your research, then we can have more enlightened local governments and more effective local governance,” she added. Aside from undertaking science-based and risk-informed action and investment planning for local governments, Legarda also stressed the importance of strengthening social protection; conducting an environmental program audit covering the performance of national agencies and LGUs in enforcing environmental laws, regulations, and compliance guidelines; advancing economic and business resilience; and strengthening partnerships and convergence. “Climate action cannot solely be the government’s responsibility. Each of us has a role to play. At the end of this decade, by 2030, is the deadline of the Sustainable Development Goals and the year our scientists have declared as the closing of the window of opportunity to deflect the catastrophic effects of climate change. This decade is our last chance,” Legarda said. “Whatever actions we take today will ultimately affect our children and grandchildren. Even if we hand them over all our material wealth, it would not matter if they live in a polluted, uninhabitable, degraded Earth. The path that we will take today will determine the fate of the next generations. Let us not fail them,” Legarda concluded. The FEP Regional Workshop for Visayas is a two-day workshop held via Zoom with the aim of helping local governments review their development plans, assess the status of development in their jurisdiction, and draft strategies to facilitate their transition towards sustainable development and improved resilience. In attendance are representatives from LGUs, the academe, industry, and other institutions.
February 23, 2021 Tuesday
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"Protektahan at Pangalagaan ang Lokal nating Industriya ng Paghahabi" — ayon sa mga Katutubong Pilipinong Manghahabi kasama ng mga Tagapag-Tanggol at Tagasulong ng Katutubong Industriya ng Paghahabi
Halimbawa ng mga pekeng habi na natagpuan sa Baguio. Litrato mula sa presentasyon ni Gng. Rosalinda Salifad, manghahabi mula sa La Trinidad, Benguet. MAYNILA, Ika-22 ng Pebrero taong 2021 — Binigyang-diin ni House Deputy Speaker at Antique Representative Loren Legarda kasama ng mga panauhing tagapagsalita ang kahalagahan ng pangangalaga at pagprotekta natin sa mga gawang-habi kasama ng tradisyonal na pamanang kultura ng mga katutubong Pilipino laban sa pagpe-peke at pang-aabuso ng ibang mga taong walang konsensya na matatawag nating 'Kriminal ng Kultura' sa gitna ng ika-35 na kabanata ng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” na may temang, "Protektahan at Pangalagaan ang Lokal nating Industriya ng Paghahabi!" na naipalabas sa Facebook Live. Nagtipon-tipon ang mga katutubong manghahabi, mga tagapag-tanggol at tagasulong, kasama ang mga kinatawan mula sa pamahalaan, na nakisali sa online paguusap-talakayan. Sila ay sina Virginia Doligas, General Manager ng Easter Weaving Room, Inc.; si Anya Lim, Co-Founder of Anthill Fabric Gallery; si Rosalina Salifad, manghahabi mula sa La Trinidad, Benguet; si Abigail Mae Bulayungan, President of PhilExpo CAR; Atty. Emerson Cuyo, Director of the Bureau of Copyright and Related Rights of the Intellectual Property Office of the Philippines; Abubacar Datumanong, Commissioner of Cultural Communities and Traditional Arts and Head of National Committee on Southern Cultural Communities of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA); Edwin Antonio, Secretary of Cultural Communities and Traditional Arts and Head of National Committee on Northern Cultural Communities of NCCA; Remedios Abgona, Chief of the Fiber Utilization And Technology Division of the Philippine Fiber Industry Development Authority (PhilFIDA); Commissioner Jennifer Pia Sibug-Las of the National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP) - Central Mindanao; and Dir. Julius Leaño, Chief of the Research and Development Division of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) Philippine Textile Research Institute (PTRI). “Ito’y napakahalaga dahil ito’y pamana ng ating mga kapatid na katutubong Pilipino. Ito’y sakop ng ating mga polisiya at mga batas, ang pagprotekta sa ating tangible at intangible heritage – yung mga resilient livelihoods ng ating mga manglilikhang-sining at manghahabi,” nabanggit ni House Deputy Speaker at Antique Representative Loren Legarda. Tinalakay ng katutubong mga manghahabi at ng mga negosyante ang epekto ng dagsang bagsak sa merkado ng gawang makinang mga kumot at mga baro na sinasabi at inaakong mga anyong-habing mula Cordillera na dumadagsa dito sa lokal nating mga merkado na mula pa sa ibayong dagat, at ito ngayon ay nakakapinasala sa ating lokal na industriyang paghahabi. “Nagsimula lahat ito noong isang taon, maraming nakapagsasabi sa amin na mayroong mga commercial cloth na ang hitsura ay kamukhang-kamukha ng design ng ating katutubong-habi. Hindi po kami nakatugon kaagad dahil wala naman po kami nakikita, ngunit pagkatapos itong mga nasabing pekeng mga materyales ay nagsimulang dumagsang-buhos sa Baguio, kung saan nabahala po kami at doon na po namin napatunayan na may mga fabric material na commercial na printed siya na katutubong disenyo at nalaman naming ito ay imported material mula sa China,” sabi ni Doligas. “Malalaman kaagad sa embroidery at texture kung ano ang printed at original. Pag printed po, manipis. Ang akala namin, 'Buti na lang nakapasok yung mga gawa natin sa department store [dito sa Baguio]', pero nung nahawakan po namin, replica pala, kasi manipis at printed lang siya," sabi ni Salifad. "Ang pagkakaroon ng mga huwad o pekeng barong-habi dito sa aming probinsya ay naka-aapekto sa marami naming mga manghahabi. Karamihan sa mga tao na hindi talaga sanay sa original or genuine woven fabrics ay pumapayag at pumipili na lang ng mga gawang kamukha at di naman orihinal. Yung ibang weavers dito, nagkakaroon na ng takot na habang kami ay mayroong limitadong kakayahan magtinda e ito namang mga replicas ay marami na ang bumibili sa kanila, kaya ang nangyayari, nandoon yung takot namin na mababawasan yung market namin, na sa kalaunan ay maka-aapekto rin sa pagbibigay namin ng trabahong gawain sa aming mga manghahabi," sabi ni Bulayungan. “Bigyan natin ng halaga ang mga habi. Ito ay hindi lang basta basta sangkap o palamuti lamang sa fashion, hindi lang ito basta tela. Ito ay kwento ng kasaysayan, kwento ng ating pagka-Pilipino. Ito ay ikino-consider ng ating mga ninuno na kanilang second skin. Bigyan natin ng halaga ang paghahabi ng higit pa sa paglagay lang natin ng presyo sa habi. Ang tela ay gawa sa kamay, hindi gawa sa makina at maraming metikulosong proseso na pinagdadaanan ang paghahabi bago siya maging tela," sabi ni Lim. Samantala, ang mga kinatawan mula sa mga ahensya ng pamahalaan ay naghayag ng kani-kanyang mga hakbanging makapagpo-protekta sa ating mga lokal na anyong paghahabi mula sa mga pagpe-peke at paghuhuwad.  "Sa ngayon po meron pong ginagawang profiling, na sa kasalukuyan ay binubuo pa rin namin, pino-profile po namin ang lahat ng tradisyonal na produkto ng ibat-ibang mga pang kulturang pamayanan sa buong bansa, na syang bahagi ng NCCA Subcommittee on Cultural Communities and Traditional Arts sa kanilang taunang plano. Ito po ay isinasakatuparan ng ibang tagataguyod po kasama po ang ating mga cluster heads," sabi ni Commissioner Datumanong ng NCCA. “Nahinto ang produksyon dahil sa pandemic tapos biglang ito po ang kahaharapin ng mga manghahabing Cordilleran, na meron palang mga produktong peke. Patuloy pa rin ang pag-aaral namin sa sitwasyon ngayon at meron kaming pinag-uusapan sa Subcommission on Cultural Communities and Traditional Arts na magkaroon sana ng talaan ng ibat-ibang textiles at designs ng mga cultural communities para sa gayon malaman din natin at magamit para sa pagtukoy at pagkilala ng different textiles,” sabi ni Sec. Edwin Antonio ng NCCA. "Meron nang naririyang Memorandum of Understanding sa pagitan ng Kagawaran ng Agrikultura at ng IPO na nilagdaan noong taong 2018. Ang pakay po ng MOU ay ang kilalanin at maitaguyod ang protection ng mga produktong nagtataglay ng tanda ng kanyang pinagmulan, mapalago ang kalidad ng produksyon, palakasin ang posisyon sa merkado, maisulong ang pantay-pantay na distribusyon ng kita para sa pambukid na mga pamayanan at makaambag sa pangkalahatang paglago ng ekonomiya at pambansang pag-unlad," sabi ni Director Abgona ng PhilFIDA. "Geographical indication po ang tawag sa sign na ginagamit sa mga produktong mayroong natatanging geographical origin, o di naman kaya ay merong mga katangian o reputasyon na maaaring makilalang mula sa origin na yon. Sa ngayon po, wala tayong sistema ng GI ngunit maaari itong maprotektahan sa ilalim ng kasalukuyang IP code bilang isang collective mark. Kung gusto ng ating mga pangkat o grupong katutubo na magkaroon ng kani-kanyang collective mark para sa kani-kanyang mga industrial weaves, pwede po silang mag-apply sa Intellectual Property Office," sabi ni Atty. Cuyo ng IPO. “Alam natin na hindi lang paghahabi ang ating problema dito, kundi pati na rin yung sinasabi nating embroidery. Nagrereklamo rin po yung ating mga Manobo mula CARAGA dahil yung Suyam nila ay lumabas na rin sa merkado na peke rin yung materyal na ginagamit at pini-print na walang pahintulot sa ating mga komunidad. Dahil marami kaming natatanggap na mga reports na gumagawa yung mga "kriminal ng kultura", enterprising individuals o mga companies nating ng mga pekeng materials na hindi nagpapaalam sa ating mga komunidad, kaya nga't bumuo kami ng Task Force kung saan ito ang mag-iimbestiga ng mga ganitong paglabag sa karapatan ng ating mga katutubo,” sabi ni Commissioner Sibug-Las ng NCIP. “Ang design component, ang proteksyon ng design, ay hindi agarang nasa ilalim ng ating mandato, pero dahil nga sa ating kakayahan at pagkakaroon ng  textile development, mayroon na ngayon tayong visualization app software kung saan maaaring maging bahagi na tayo ng  documentation ng two-dimension patterns ng lahat ng mga textiles sa buong Pilipinas. Nilalagyan na nga natin ngayon ng laman ang ating database sa ating textile product development center para po digitalized na yung ating mga designs,” sabi ni Dir. Leaño ng PTRI. Para lamang mapalakas pa ang  traditional property rights ng ating mga IPs at maprotektahan ang kani-kanyang traditional cultural heritage, Isinulong ni Deputy Speaker at Antique Representative Loren Legarda ang House Bill No. 7811 or An Act Safeguarding the Traditional Property Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Ang batas ay naglalayong pagbawalan ang posibleng pang-aabuso o pananamantala ng ating mga pamanang kultura, pinupunan nito ang ating mga pagkukulang at gumagamit ng conventional forms ng intellectual property, tulad ng copyright, royalty, at ownership. Karagdagang isinulong ni Legarda ang House Resolution No. 1549 na siyang humihikayat sa House Special Committee on Creative Industry and Performing Arts na maglunsad ng isang  inquiry, in aid of legislation, ukol sa usapin ng counterfeit garments na nagmumula pa sa ibayong dagat na sinasabi at inaakalang gawa o barong habing mula Cordillera. Bilang pagtatapos ni Legarda, aniya, "Ang sining at ang mga likhang sining ng ating mga kapatid na katutubo (IPs) ay nangangailangan ng masusi at malalimang proseso ng mangangalaga at pagpro-protekta. 'Di natin dapat hayaan na ang kanilang mga malikhaing gawang sining na mula pa sa kani-kaniyang mga pamanang kultura ay mapasailalim sa banta ng mga huwad at pekeng imported materials".
February 22, 2021 Monday
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