Get ready, be updated. Bringing you the latest news about the Climate Change Commission.
 


 

Make our schools disaster-resilient
Contingency planning is important as it sets guidance on how to respond in the event of an emergency or disaster, and helps schools to resume normal activities as quickly as possible. Photo from the presentation of Ms. Monalyn Bermijiso of DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service. MANILA, 22 October 2021 — The 67th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” highlighted the ways the Department of Education (DepEd) instills and practices disaster risk reduction and preparedness in all its offices, schools, and for learners and personnel.   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda, with CCC Commissioner Rachel Herrera as co-host, featured guests including Dir. Ronilda Co and Ms. Monalyn Bermijiso of DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS); Mr. Glenn Sabido from the Schools Division Office (SDO) of Iloilo; Ms. Ghia Ureta from Alasasin Elementary School, SDO Bataan; and Ms. Johannna Mae Sitchon from Panabo City National High School, SDO Panabo City.   “Sa gitna ng iba’t ibang panganib na dala ng mga natural hazards tulad ng bagyo, matinding tagtuyot, lindol, o pagputok ng bulkan, mahalaga na ang ating mga public schools o paaralan ay nasa ligtas na lugar. Kaya dapat ay mayroon tayong risk mapping at risk assessment sa bawat paaralan at bawat local government unit. Ang istruktura ng ating mga paaralan ay kailangang disaster-proof at akma sa local hazards. Ang mga mag-aaral, guro, at mga staff ng paaralan ay kailangang handa rin sa kung ano mang pwedeng mangyari, in the case of a disaster,” said Deputy Speaker Legarda.   The guests shared their initiatives in helping students understand the whys and hows of disaster preparedness and emphasized the importance of making schools and communities adaptive and disaster-resilient.   “Ang ating vision ay maging resilient ang ating mga learners and enjoy and exercise their rights to be safe and protected. Ang learners natin ay vulnerable, pero they are also actors of risk reduction and resilience. Sa ating preparedness ay may meaningful participation ang mga bata, and our personnel act as enablers and support to our learners. Ang ginagawa natin ay system-wide approach, hindi lang sa isang opisina, kundi sa lahat ng levels of governance,” said Dir. Co.   “Paano nga ba natin itinuturo sa mga paaralan at sa ating mag-aaral ‘yung kultura ng paghahanda? Una ay ang pag-integrate natin sa ating curriculum. Based sa ating K-12 curriculum guide, pumapasok ang DRR topics sa mga subjects na: Science, Health, at Araling Panlipunan. Dito natin napag-aaralan ‘yung mga factors na nakakaapekto sa pagbabago ng klima, ano ang dapat gawin ng mga mag-aaral before, during, and after natural hazards, anu-ano ang nilalaman ng GO bag, at ano ‘yung mga survival skills na kailangan nating matutunan,” said Ms. Bermijiso.   “One of our best practices in Iloilo is the Batang Empowered and Resilient Team (BERT) program. Ito ay grupo ng mga estudyante na kung saan ay nagfa-facilitate ng peer-to-peer teaching of DRRM sa kani-kanilang schools. Sila rin ang in-charge sa student-led school watching at hazard mapping kung saan pini-present nila ang result sa kanilang school planning team to be integrated in their school improvement plan and their annual investment plan. They also serve as focal persons of learners in planning for a safe school, and  the one promoting child-centered DRRM in school,” said Mr. Sabido.   “When the COVID-19 pandemic came in, we strategized to create immediate and timely responses to the current health crisis. These include the procurement of emergency response equipment and sanitation materials, availability of isolation room with emergency response equipment, as well as outlining our COVID-19 IATF-aligned school health protocols," said Ms. Sitchon.   “Relative to the efforts of managing disasters in the country, we believe that Alasasin Elementary School has a tangible role in building our community as a resilient learning environment. We plan and commit efforts to create a conducive learning atmosphere and process to enable our learners to develop their full potentials, morals, and skills needed for themselves, their communities, and the country,” said Ms. Ureta.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 22, 2021 Friday
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CCC marks its 12th anniversary; Continues to provide policy, service amidst COVID-19 pandemic
MANILA, 22 October 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) continues its comprehensive efforts to adapt to a new normal and strengthens climate resilience as it celebrates its 12th year in service tomorrow.   The Commission was formed under Republic Act 9729 or the Climate Change Act signed in October 23, 2009. Under the Office of the President, the CCC is the sole policy-making body of the government tasked to coordinate, monitor and evaluate the programs and action plans of the government relating to climate change.   Despite the imposition of community quarantines brought by the COVID-19 pandemic, the CCC has responded to emerging challenges of the changing policy landscape and pursued the delivery of its mandates more efficiently and effectively.   Through the facilitation of CCC, the Philippines communicated its first Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) on 15 April 2021 to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Towards its implementation and reporting, the CCC has sustained its coordination and collaboration efforts with agencies and institutions in developing policy and measures (PAMs) of the lead sectoral agencies and identifying technical and implementation support needs.   Just last year, the Commission developed major resolutions and policy directives that mainstream climate change adaptation and mitigation actions, which include:   ·Adopting the Thematic Priorities of the Philippine Country Programme for the Green Climate Fund 2019-2023; ·Urging the Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation - Disaster Risk Reduction (CCAM-DRR) Cabinet Cluster, and Its Member Agencies to Adopt the Principles of the Circular Economy, Encourage the Use of Environment-Friendly Products and Practices, And Prohibit Single-Use Plastics in Their Respective Offices; ·Endorsing to the President of the Republic of the Philippines the Submission of the First Philippine Nationally Determined Contribution to the UNFCCC; ·Creating the Interagency Technical Working Group for Sustainable Finance; and ·Promulgating the Call for Nominations to the National Panel of Technical Experts of the Climate Change Commission.   The Commission delivers various technical advisory support and capacity building initiatives geared towards enabling national government agencies and local government units to design and program climate change plans, activities, and programs.   The CCC also pursues enhanced access to finance instruments such as Green Climate Fund (GCF) and People’s Survival Fund (PSF), and continues to monitor progress of public appropriations for climate action.   The Commission also conducted digital climate change capacity building and technical assistance activities to build the adaptive capacities and knowledge on climate change mitigation of national and local stakeholders. These include webinar workshops on NDC, local climate change action plan (LCCAP), national and local climate change expenditure tagging (CCET), and greenhouse gas inventory; PSF e-learning sessions and virtual clinics; and the Klima Film Festival for the youth.   The Commission continues to embark on partnerships with various agencies in government,  the private sector, and civil society to spark local action that bring in new voices that improve areas of action on climate, sustainable  development, and disaster risk reduction.   Moreover, the CCC has been a staunch advocate for gender empowerment and has consistently implemented efforts to ensure gender equity in terms of representation, non-discrimination, and respect of identity.   Recognizing the impacts of single-use plastics on climate, the CCC is also actively pushing for the passage of a landmark law that shall ban the single-use plastics and accelerate the uptake of circular economy to strengthen the country’s climate action.   Amidst the pandemic, the Commission carried out its information and education campaigns and introduced innovations in the delivery of its capacity development programs, through e-learning platforms, webinar presentations on climate change adaptation and mitigation, and other initiatives for public awareness and participation, aside from the regular press releases and artcards posted on the CCC social media accounts.   As the country faces the looming climate emergency, the Commission shall continue to deliver on its programs and outputs as planned and targeted, in line with the goal to build the adaptive capacity of communities, increase resilience of natural ecosystems to climate change, and optimize mitigation opportunities towards sustainable development.   For the succeeding years, the CCC will lay the urgent work ahead towards creating an enabling environment to guide and track progress of the transition to a low-carbon economy and transformation towards a climate-smart Philippines.   To know the various programs and events spearheaded by the Climate Change Commission, visit its website at climate.gov.ph or its social media accounts at CCCPhl.
October 22, 2021 Friday
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Disaster Preparedness in Schools in 67th Episode of 'Stories For A Better Normal'
MANILA, 20 October 2021 — The 67th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” will feature the programs, projects, and activities of the Department of Education (DepEd) that inculcate disaster preparedness in all DepEd offices, schools, learners, and personnel.   The online conversation, conceptualized and hosted by three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 21 October 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl, facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda, and facebook.com/DepartmentOfEducation.PH. Two lucky viewers can win tablets by tuning in throughout the program.   Joining the online conversation are Dir. Ronilda Co and Ms. Monalyn Bermijiso of DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS); Mr. Glenn Sabido from the Schools Division Office (SDO) of Iloilo; Ms. Ghia Ureta from Alasasin Elementary School, SDO Bataan; and Ms. Johannna Mae Sitchon from Panabo City National High School, SDO Panabo City to discuss the DepEd’s disaster preparedness programs and good practices in public schools.   The Philippines, given its geographical location, archipelagic formation in the tropical Pacific, and population distribution, is highly exposed to natural hazards such as storms, flooding, drought, and rise in sea level, and is greatly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.    In 2021, the Global Climate Risk Index listed the Philippines as the number four country most affected by extreme weather events.  The country was likewise ranked ninth highest disaster risk among 181 countries in the world.   Based on the Department of Education (DepEd) Enhanced Basic Education Information System (EBEIS) data from school years 2009-2010 to 2018-2019, 47,188 schools reported to have experienced natural hazards.   Hence, reinforcing the capacities of the whole community towards the risk and adverse impacts of natural hazards is essential in order to reduce vulnerability.   The DepEd recognizes its responsibility in addressing these vulnerabilities. Through its disaster preparedness program initiatives, DepEd aims to protect its education investments, most especially its stakeholders, from the impacts of natural and human-induced hazards.   As part of its disaster preparedness program, the Department through the Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service is currently developing an edutainment series called “The Adventures of Ready Kid!”. This series is intended for children to understand natural hazards and disaster preparedness concepts easily. The series will contain 8 episodes, each providing a discussion on what to do before, during, and after each hazard. It will also introduce basic concepts about each hazard, including their causes or triggers, effects on schools and community, and mitigation measures in the Philippine setting.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 20, 2021 Wednesday
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CCC, Nestle PH launch Klimathon, partner to empower youth for climate action
MANILA, 20 October 2021 — The Climate Change Commission and Nestle Philippines are partnering to empower Filipino youth for climate action as they launched “Klimathon: Our Race Towards a Net Zero Reality” on Wednesday, October 20, 2020.   Klimathon is an innovation lab focused on new and workable solutions that can help address current issues on the climate crisis, focusing on plastic waste management, renewable energy and energy efficiency, and food security. The initiative aims to amplify the voice of the youth and highlight their capability to develop and implement meaningful climate actions.   CCC Chairperson-designate and Finance Secretary Carlos G. Dominguez, who formally opened the launch, expressed his gratitude to the organizers and participants of Klimathon for “bringing together bright young minds from all over the country”.   “Your proposals will surely help our experts craft and implement achievable, coherent, concerted, and compelling climate action programs on the ground,” Dominguez said.   Nestle Philippines Chairman and CEO Kais Marzouki likewise highlighted the “crucial and necessary role” of the youth in tackling climate change, especially in addressing plastic problems, lowering greenhouse gas emissions, and ensuring food security.   “At Nestle Philippines, one of the largest markets for Nestle worldwide, we are deeply committed to pursuing our environmental goals. These support the attainment of the country’s Nationally Determined Contribution,” Marzouki noted.   “We cannot do this alone. In order to succeed, we must engage with other stakeholders. Thus, we are happy to collaborate with the CCC towards strengthening initiatives to promote science-based solutions to climate change—in particular, working with our youth,” he emphasized.   CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Emmanuel De Guzman also commended Nestle Philippines “for its express resolve to reduce by half its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 towards net zero by 2050,” as well as for its efforts to engage the youth.   “With the world set to have the largest youth population ever in the coming years, honing their talents and harnessing their creativity to make a difference in climate action and to exemplify a sustainable, climate-friendly lifestyle is key to transforming our society,” De Guzman said.   The partnership was formalized in the signing of a Memorandum of Agreement led by De Guzman and Nestle Philippines Senior Vice President and Head of Public Affairs Arlene Tan-Bantoto. Also giving their messages of support during the launch and signing were Senator Pia Cayetano, Department of Environment and Natural Resources Undersecretary Analiza Rebuelta-Teh on behalf of Secretary Roy Cimatu, The Climate Reality Project Philippines Branch Manager Nazrin Camille Castro, and Kids for Kids Philippines founders Natasha and Isabelle Mañosa-Tanjutco.   Citing a study showing that a six-year-old child today will experience thrice as many disasters than their grandparents, CCC Commissioner Rachel Anne Herrera underscored how young people have been more proactive and more passionate about climate issues.   “We need to work for our youth and with them. This is what Klimathon is really all about—empowering and helping our youth really make an impact,” Herrera added.   The Klimathon is open to groups of Filipino students and young professionals, aged 16 to 24, who could develop projects based on one of the three focus pillars: plastic waste management, energy efficiency and renewable energy, and food security. Finalists will undergo a mentorship program with industry and field experts and cash prizes await the winning teams.   “These subject matter experts are from government, civil society, and even our subject matter experts from Nestle. They will mentor the finalists, and with this Klimathon, they will have more opportunities—they can expand their network, and we can also introduce their innovation to our partners in the whole value chain,” said Nestle Philippines Assistant VP for Sustainability and Public Affairs Christine Ponce-Garcia.   “We will ensure that these ideas come intro fruition through our mentorship, and we will ensure also that these ideas are introduced to our experts not just in Nestle but also in other companies as well,” she added.   Proposals may be sent to klimathon2021@gmail.com on or before November 10, 2021. More details on the competition mechanics are available through this link : https://climate.gov.ph/events/klimathon.
October 20, 2021 Wednesday
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CCC: Engage people living in poverty in climate, pandemic recovery efforts
MANILA, 17 October 2021 — In observance of the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) pledges for solidarity and promotion of concrete activities geared toward ending poverty.   October 17 is designated as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty through UN Resolution No. 47/196, which aims to raise awareness and highlight the problems faced by poverty-stricken people or families and work towards eradicating poverty globally in all its forms.   People living in poverty experience many injustices in life, including dangerous work conditions, unsafe housing, lack of nutritious food and water, unequal access to justice, lack of political power, and limited access to health care. They are the ones most exposed, least resourced and suffer the most from the climate emergency and the pandemic.    They are at the frontline of climate change impacts with severe drought bringing hunger, and floods wiping away crop fields, leading to loss of livelihoods. They work largely in the informal sector and often live in low-quality, unsafe housing in unhealthy environments next to dumping sites or in unsafe areas along mountain edges or swamps.  When a disaster strikes, their homes and lives are the first to be destroyed. Moreover, they are often excluded from a sustainable lifestyle simply because of their lack of access to financial and physical resources, and yet they also risk being blamed for this.    The COVID-19 pandemic reversed years of progress in the fight against poverty. Millions of people around the world have been pushed into poverty as a result of the economic shutdown, especially in areas where poverty rates are already high.  The ‘new poor’ join the ranks of people already living in poverty pre-pandemic.   As the country embarks in post-COVID recovery and building back better, the CCC said that the people living in extreme poverty should not be returned to the structural disadvantages and inequalities of the past. Rather, they must build forward.   This year’s theme, “Building forward together: Ending Persistent Poverty, Respecting all People and our Planet,” means transforming the relationship with nature, dismantling structures of discrimination that disadvantage people in poverty and building on the moral and legal framework of human rights that places human dignity at the heart of policy and action.   Poverty eradication strategies, climate action and post COVID-19 recovery efforts must equally reach the communities who have been pushed furthest behind and actively encourage and engage them in the implementation of policies and decision-making processes that directly affect their lives.
October 17, 2021 Sunday
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CCC on World Food Day: Make affordable, healthy food accessible for all
MANILA, 16 October 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) joins the call for an improved access to healthy, affordable and sustainable food diets, especially in the era of a global pandemic, in observance of World Food Day today with the theme, “Our actions are our future.”   According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), more than three billion people, or almost 40% of the world’s population, cannot afford a healthy diet, while almost 2 billion people are overweight or obese due to poor diet and sedentary lifestyle.   Moreover, about 14% of the world’s food is lost due to inadequate harvesting, handling, storage and transit, and 17% is wasted at the consumer level, and in turn, emits greenhouse gas.   With COVID-19, intensifying impacts of climate change, and unsustainable management of food, nutrition and food security are expected to worsen, and the vulnerable and marginalized sectors like smallholder farmers and indigenous peoples will be severely affected.   With this, the CCC urges all sectors – national and governments, businesses, civil society groups, academe,  the youth, and individuals – to unite and play more positive roles to end hunger by raising awareness and by adopting a more sustainable food system that shall ensure the production and availability of affordable and nutritious food for every Filipino. These must be done while changing consumption behaviors.   The CCC emphasizes that existing good practices like the “Plant, Plant, Plant” and the Adaptation and Mitigation Initiatives in Agriculture (AMIA) programs of the Department of Agriculture should continue and be strengthened; the Gulayan sa Paaralan of the Department of Education should be supported at the local level; and climate-resilient farming practices should be scaled up to keep a steady supply of healthy food within communities.   The agency also points to the harmful effects of food waste, and presented easy steps to avoid it:   1.    Shop smart by making a list and sticking to it; 2.    Get only what you can eat; 3.    Bring home leftovers; 4.    Store your food correctly; 5.    Save your seeds and either plant or share; and 6.    Compost as much as you can.   The food we produce, purchase, cook, eat, and store impacts the entire food cycle. It is crucial to be mindful of our actions to secure  brighter future of the environment and human beings.   World Food Day is celebrated every year around the world on 16 October in honor of the date of the founding of the FAO in 1945 and to tackle global hunger and eradicate it across the world. It also aims to bring awareness on the important global issues such as poverty, conflict and climate change that impact the world’s food supply and distribution. 
October 16, 2021 Saturday
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CCC welcomes new panel of technical experts to localize science-based climate action
MANILA, 15 October 2021 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) welcomed the new set of its National Panel of Technical Experts (NPTE) in a press conference last October 13.   “We are no longer in the business of building a grand theory about climate change. We are now in the business of implementing concrete projects and programs to build the resilience of our communities, reverse the degradation, and protect our vital food sources. What is global must now be addressed at the local level. What was theoretical now demands practical applications on the ground,” said Department of Finance Secretary Carlos G. Dominguez III, Chairperson-designate of CCC, as he introduced the sixteen (16) new members of the panel.   Under the Climate Change Act of 2009, the NPTE provides technical advice to the Commission in climate science, technologies, and best practices for risk assessment and enhancement of the adaptive capacity of vulnerable human settlements to potential impacts of climate change.   This year, the panel was reconstituted to fill in with outstanding Filipino experts who are working on the ground and engaging with local communities in terms of climate change adaptation and mitigation, in line with the country’s change of paradigm to combat the effects of the climate crisis.   From 130 nominees screened by the Chairperson-designate and the three Commissioners of CCC, the following were selected:   1.    Dr. Jihan H. Adil, environmental planning and engineering expert specializing in wastewater and climate change.from Zamboanga City. She is currently the National President of Society of Environmental Engineers and Head of the Department of Environmental Engineering, Western Mindanao State University;   2.    Dr. Nathaniel R. Alibuyog, agricultural engineer specializing in land and water management, and Dean of the College of Engineering, Mariano Marcos State University in Batac, Ilocos Norte;   3.    Dr. Zenaida L. Andrade, chemical engineer and Associate Professor and Program Coordinator of the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science in Eastern Visayas State University in Tacloban City;   4.    Dr. Wilfredo L. Campos, an expert in biological oceanography, coastal ecology and ecosystems, coral reef ecology, and fisheries. He is currently the Chair of the Division of Biological Sciences, University of the Philippines Visayas;   5.    Dr. Gay D. Defiesta, who specializes in natural resource and agricultural economics, and currently a Professor at the University of the Philippines Visayas;   6.    Dr. Ramon Lorenzo Luis R. Guinto is a staunch planetary health advocate and practitioner. Currently, he is an associate professor of the Practice of Global Public Health and Inaugural Director of the Planetary and Global Health Program of the St. Luke’s Medical Center College of Medicine;   7.    Dr. Eduardo O. Mangaoang, an expert in upland, lowland, and coastal forest landscape restoration and conservation. Currently, he is a Professor and Director of the Regional Climate Change R&D Center of Visayas State University in Baybay, Leyte;   8.    Dr. Jimmy T. Masagca, an expert in fisheries and mangroves, and Professor at the Catanduanes State University and Head of Research and Knowledge Management of the Pacific Island Institute for Pedagogy, Technology, Arts and Sciences;   9.    Dr. Susan P. Mercado, an international public health and food security expert. She has served as Undersecretary of the Department of Health and current Director of the Food Systems and Resiliency Program at the Hawaii Public Health Institute, and Special Envoy of the President for Global Health Initiatives;   10. Dr. Richard N. Muallil, a marine scientist and a recognized expert in coastal resource management and marine protected areas. He is the Director of Continuing Education and Extension Services, Mindanao State University in Tawi-Tawi;   11. Dr. Doracie B. Zoleta-Nantes, a specialist in geography and hazards studies, and President of Southern Luzon State University in Lucban, Quezon Province;   12. Dr. Emma E. Porio, a specialist in climate and disaster vulnerability and gender assessment, and Professor Emeritus at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, School of Social Sciences of the Ateneo de Manila University. She is also a Science Research Fellow of the Manila Observatory where she is Project Leader and Principal Investigator of the transdisciplinary action research project, "Coastal Cities at Risk: Investing in Climate and Disaster Resilience in the Philippines (CCARPH);   13. Dr. Patricia Ann J. Sanchez, a licensed agricultural engineer specializing in disaster risk management and water resource assessment. She is currently an Associate Professor and Chair of the Interdisciplinary Studies Center for Water (ISCW) at the University of the Philippines Los Baños;   14. Engr. Merriam M. Santillan, a geodetic engineer, and Dean of the College of Engineering and Geosciences at Caraga State University in Butuan City;   15. Dr. Encarnacion Emilia S. Yap, a post-harvest fisheries technology specialist, and Dean of the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of the Philippines Visayas; and   16. Dr. Maria Angela G. Zafra, an expert in inclusive business models, sustainable finance, and gender inclusivity, and adjunct faculty at the School of Business and Governance, Ateneo de Davao University. She is the executive director of the Strategia Development Research Institute, a nonprofit research organization providing policy research, capacity building, and technical assistance in various social and economic development areas.   The CCC Commissioners also welcomed the new members of the panel.   "The science of climate change is unequivocal, its message to everyone is clear: We’re all in danger, our survival is at stake, and urgent action can still save us. I trust that our new assembly of experts will be truly generous in lending their knowledge and expertise and untiring in helping convey this compelling message of science down to the last mile,” said Secretary Emmanuel M. de Guzman.   "It is time to localize everything: It's not about concepts anymore, but this is bringing action now to the local level. That is actually the purpose of mainstreaming climate change action which, as expected, should not just linger on the nationwide scale, but translated into local actions with corresponding benefits,” said Commissioner Noel Antonio Gaerlan.   "The climate crisis is based on solid scientific analysis, but it is also best explained as a human-caused problem caused by collective behavior. Our accumulated carbon emissions in the atmosphere are products of fossil fuel-based technology and energy, and they are also borne out of human activity and choices. Together with the diverse roster of experts, we can make climate science accessible and understandable to our communities on the ground as tools for decision-making and investment planning,” said Commissioner Rachel Anne S. Herrera.   The Commission also expressed their gratitude to the former members of the panel, who served from 2015 up to September of this year.   To know more about the new NPTE, visit the CCC Facebook page at https://facebook.com/CCCPhl or its website at https://climate.gov.ph/our-story/our-experts/profiles-of-members. 
October 15, 2021 Friday
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CCC on IDDR 2021: Int’l cooperation is needed to reduce disaster risks and losses
MANILA, 13 October 2021 — In celebration of the International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) amplifies the call for international cooperation to reduce disaster risk and losses.   October 13 is designated as the International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction through UN Resolution 64/200, which aims to raise awareness on the importance of shifting from post-disaster reaction to pre-disaster action and how countries must build their capacities in managing disaster and climate risk, in line with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030.   The Sendai Framework has seven strategic targets and 38 indicators for measuring progress on reducing disaster risk and losses. The year’s theme focuses on the sixth target: “Substantially enhance international cooperation to developing countries through adequate and sustainable support to complement their national actions for implementation of the present Framework by 2030.”   The CCC said that this year’s target underscores that reducing disaster risk has never been more challenging due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the growing climate emergency.   Disasters disproportionately affect developing countries, particularly archipelagic countries or countries with extensive coastlines like the Philippines, due to higher vulnerabilities and increased risk levels especially in terms of mortality, numbers of people injured, displaced and homeless, economic losses (as a percentage of GDP) and damage to critical infrastructure.   The impacts of disasters, most of which have increased in intensity and have been exacerbated by climate change, often greatly exceed the country’s capacity to respond to and recover from disasters and impede progress towards sustainable development.   For the CCC, there is a need to scale up international cooperation for disaster risk reduction to support climate-vulnerable countries in setting climate change adaptation and resilience-building programs, in order to build resilience and reduce risk against the impact of climate hazards such as droughts, floods and rising sea-levels.   These include capacity-building, technology transfer, and increasing the availability of and access to multi-hazard early warning systems at the local level which are vital to support adaptation in climate-sensitive sectors such as health, water and agriculture.   As COP26 approaches, the CCC hopes that the forthcoming conference will deliver on the promise of significantly increasing levels of global ambition when it comes to both reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and support to climate change adaptation.   Moreover, international cooperation for disaster risk reduction is needed to ensure that our most vulnerable populations, including women, children and youth, people with disabilities, the elderly, migrants and indigenous people, which have contributed the least to the climate emergency, are not abandoned or left behind. 
October 13, 2021 Wednesday
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The ocean is our food bank; deposit back through sustainable fishing practices
MANILA, 12 October 2021 —  The 65th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” featured climate change adaptation and resilience practices as well as the protection and restoration efforts of our fisherfolk and advocate groups to support the fisheries sector.   The online conversation conceptualized and hosted by a three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda featured guests including Roberto “Ka Dodoy” Ballon, Chairperson of the Coalition of Municipal Fisherfolk Associations in Zamboanga Sibugay and 2021 Ramon Magsaysay awardee; Ruperto “Ka Uper” Aleroza, National Anti-Poverty Commission Vice Chair for Basic Sectors; and Atty. Rhea Yray-Frossard, Fisheries Management Officer and Coordinator. Climate Change Commissioner Rachel Anne Herrera opened the show and joined as co-host.   “Sa gitna ng lumalalang krisis sa klima o climate emergency, patuloy na pag-init ng mundo, pagtaas ng lebel at pag-init ng tubig-dagat dahil sa pag-absorb ng extra carbon dioxide na nasa hangin, polusyon at plastic wastes, illegal fishing activities, ano na ang kalagayan ng ating karagatan, coral reefs, mangroves, at mga isda? What are the practices related to climate change adaptation na nakatutulong sa pagprotect at pagrestore ng marine ecosystems ang pwede nating gamitin o matututunan mula sa mga komunidad at organisasyon na naging successful na sa pag-implement ng mga ganitong practices? We will discuss ways of protecting and healing our marine environment in order to revive the fisheries sector,” said Commissioner Herrera.   Mr. Ballon shared their story of reviving the dying fishing industry through mangrove restoration and implementing sustainable fishing practices. He recalled that before, mangrove forests have been converted into aquaculture farms  As mangrove forests vanished, fishers are catching less amount of fish, which led them into poverty. Eventually, fishers resorted to dynamite fishing, which further led to destruction of their fishing areas.   To restore fish catch and marine habitats, Ballon and others have started to plant mangroves. Today, through the Coalition of Municipal Fisherfolk Associations in Zamboanga Sibugay (Comfas), more fishers and coastal municipalities now understand the importance of a healthy marine ecosystem for sustainable fisheries by replicating their mangrove planting initiatives.   “Mayroon tayong karagatan at iyon po ang ating bangko. Tuwing wala po kaming pera pantustos sa aming pamilya at kabuhayan, nagwi-withdraw po kami sa aming bangko. Ngayon, alam na namin kung paano pangalagaan ang ating napakayaman na bangko na karagatan, na may mangrove, sea corals, at sea grasses. Hindi lang kami nag wi-withdraw, kung hindi nagde-deposit din kami sa pamamagitan ng pagtatanim ng mangroves, hindi pagtatapon ng basura, coastal clean-ups, at hindi pagsira ng karagatan tulad ng illegal fishing,” said Ballon.   Atty. Frossard shared the Oceana’s efforts in helping the fisherfolks and coastal communities adapt to the impacts of climate change through information and education campaigns, and lobbying science-based policies for ocean conservation, fisheries protection, and food security.   “In our problem with climate change, everything is connected, and we need to act now. Ito yung kailangan naming ma-emphasize talaga that in Oceana there’s a sense of urgency in implementing full and effective implementation of our laws in prioritizing the fisherfolks that are most vulnerable with the effects of climate change. Empowering coastal communities amid the pandemic is an opportunity we cannot afford to miss,” said Atty. Frossard.   Mr. Aleroza shared the efforts of the National Anti-Poverty Commission in protecting the rights of the fisherfolk and building their climate resilience, and emphasized the need for the establishment of a department that will facilitate the matters concerning fisheries.   "Kung pag-uusapan ang epekto ng climate change, talagang napakalaki ang impact nito sa ating mga mangingisda. Ang pag-init ng tubig ay nagkakaroon ng coral bleaching o pagputi ng ating bahura. Dahil diyan ay namamatay din yung mga organic na pagkain ng mga isda at lumalayo ang ating mga isda sa iba pang uri ng nabubuhay sa ating katubigan. At dahil din sa init na nararamdaman ng mangingisda habang nasa laot, hindi na kami makatagal. Gustuhin man namin na may mahuli pa, 'pag sobrang mainit na ay kailangan na naming umuwi. Dahil doon, ang epekto naman sa kabuhayan namin ay yung pagbaba ng aming huli at kita," said Aleroza.   Legarda lauded these initiatives and efforts of fisherfolk groups and fisheries advocates, and vows to further help the fisheries sector to thrive amid COVID-19 and climate emergency and achieve sustainable development.   “Ang ating karagatan ay bangko ng pagkain, pagmamay-ari nating mga Pilipino, at ang ating mga mangingisda ang siyang nangangalaga rito. Dapat na magtulungan tayo para mapalaganap natin ang Ecological Solid Waste Management Law sa 80 provinces, at sa mahigit na 800 coastal cities and municipalities sa ating bansa,” said Legarda.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation. 
October 12, 2021 Tuesday
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CCC, DOF to hold joint presscon with new National Panel of Technical Experts
MANILA, 8 October 2021 — New members of the Climate Change Commission (CCC) National Panel of Technical Experts (NPTE) will be announced by the CCC together with the Department of Finance (DOF) in an online press conference on Wednesday, October 13, 2021 to be livestreamed on the CCC and DOF Facebook pages at facebook.com/CCCPhl and https://www.facebook.com/DOFPH.   The new NPTE members will be joined by DOF Secretary and CCC Chairperson-designate, Carlos G. Dominguez, CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Emmanuel M. de Guzman, and CCC Commissioners Noel Antonio V. Gaerlan, and Rachel Anne S. Herrera. The presscon will be moderated by DOF Assistant Secretary Paola Alvarez.   “After two months of nomination and selection, we are now ready to welcome the newly-appointed panel of technical experts that shall guide us as we strengthen evidence-based action towards addressing the climate crisis,” said Secretary de Guzman.   The NPTE is composed of experts in various disciplines related to climate change and disaster risk reduction. The experts pool provides technical advice to the Commission in climate science and its cross-cutting sectoral themes, green technologies, and best practices for risk assessment and enhancement of the adaptive capacity of vulnerable communities to potential impacts of climate change, as created under the Climate Change Act of 2009 or Republic Act No. 9729.   The call for nominations opened in July 7 of this year with the aim to broaden the country’s pool of experts on climate change and ensure institutional, regional, sectoral, and gender representation in the NPTE membership.   Know more about the National Panel of Technical Experts’ activities by visiting the website of the CCC at https://climate.gov.ph/our-story/our-experts/national-panel-of-technical-experts-forum.
October 08, 2021 Friday
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Pangingisda sa Nagbabagong Klima, tampok sa ika-65 na episode ng seryeng ‘Stories for a Better Normal’
MAYNILA, ika-07 ng Oktubre 2021 — Pag-uusapan ang pangangalaga at pagpapanumbalik ng marine environment para buhaying muli ang fisheries sector ngayong ika-65 na episode ng seryeng “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” na may temang, “Pangingisda sa Nagbabagong Klima.”   Ang online na talakayan, na hango sa konsepto at pangunguna ng dating three-term Senator, na ngayo’y Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, ay ipapalabas sa Huwebes, ika-07 ng Oktubre 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live sa facebook.com/CCCPhl at facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda. Dalawang masuwerteng manonood ang maaaring manalo ng mga tablet kung makakapag tune in sa buong programa.   Kasama sa online na talakayan sina Roberto “Ka Dodoy” Ballon, Chairperson ng Coalition of Municipal Fisherfolk Associations sa Zamboanga Sibugay at Ramon Magsaysay awardee para sa taong 2021; Ruperto “Ka Uper” Aleroza, National Anti-Poverty Commission Vice Chair for Basic Sectors; at Atty. Rhea Yray-Frossard, Fisheries Management and Campaign Research Manager ng Oceana upang pag-usapan ang mga climate resilience efforts sa loob ng fisheries sector.   Bilang isang arkipelago, napapaligiran ang Pilipinas ng malawak na marine at inland waters. Ang karagatan ng Pilipinas ay ang siyang nagtutustos ng pagkain para sa buong bansa, at ang pangingisda ay isa sa mga pangunahing industriya na nagbibigay ng kabuhayan sa milyun-milyong mga Pilipino.   Gayunpaman, unti-unting nababawasan ang marine productivity dahil sa environmental degradation at hindi epektibong pamamahala ng mga tao, at ang tuluyang pag-init ng mga karagatan dahil sa climate change na siyang pumapatay sa mga coral reef na nagsisilbing tirahan para sa mga marine wildlife. Bukod dito, ang hindi sustenableng pamamaraan ng pangingisda, tulad ng overfishing at illegal fishing, ang pinakalaganap sa lahat ng mga lokal na banta sa mga coral reef at marine wildlife. Lahat ng ito ay nagdudulot sa kabawasan ng isda sa mga karagatan at pagkawala ng pangkabuhayan ng mga mangingisda.   Tatalakayin sa episode ang mga kasanayan sa climate change adaptation pati na rin ang mga protection at restoration efforts ng ating mga mangingisda at mga grupong may kahalintulad ding adbokasiya upang higit na hikayatin ang pamahalaan na magbigay ng sapat na suporta sa fisheries sector.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan, kamalayang pang-kapaligiran, at mga kasanayan sa pakiki-angkop sa klima, naglalayon ang “Stories for a Better Normal” na baguhin ang kaisipan ng bawat Pilipino, mga pamilya at pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga paraan kung paano maisasakatuparan ang ‘better normal’ sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.   Ang online na talakayan na ito ay na-organisa sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission, na binigyang-suporta naman ng Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines at Mother Earth Foundation.
October 07, 2021 Thursday
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Fisheries in a Changing Climate in 65th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 5 October 2021 — Fisherfolk leaders and fisheries advocates will gather virtually to promote the protection and restoration of the marine environment to revive the fisheries sector on the 65th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic, “Pangingisda sa Nagbabagong Klima.”   The online conversation, conceptualized and hosted by a three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 7 October 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl and facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda. Two lucky viewers can win tablets by tuning in throughout the program.   Joining the online conversation are Roberto “Ka Dodoy” Ballon, Chairperson of the Coalition of Municipal Fisherfolk Associations in Zamboanga Sibugay and Ramon Magsaysay awardee 2021; Ruperto “Ka Uper” Aleroza, National Anti-Poverty Commission Vice Chair for Basic Sectors; and Atty. Rhea Yray-Frossard, Fisheries Management Officer and Coordinator to discuss climate resilience efforts in the fisheries sector.   The Philippines, being an archipelagic country, is surrounded by vast marine and inland waters. The Philippine seas supply food for the whole country, and fisheries are one of the major industries that provide a livelihood to millions of Filipinos.   However, marine productivity has been declining due to environmental degradation and ineffective management of humans, and the overheating oceans due to climate change are killing the coral reefs that serve as habitats for marine wildlife. Moreover, unsustainable fishing, such as overfishing and illegal fishing, is the most pervasive of all local threats to coral reefs and marine wildlife. All of these factors contribute to the decline of fish in the oceans and the loss of livelihood of fisherfolk.   The upcoming episode will highlight climate change adaptation practices as well as the protection and restoration efforts of our fisherfolk and advocate groups to further encourage national and local governments to provide adequate support to the fisheries sector.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 05, 2021 Tuesday
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Heritage trees are the country’s living monuments
Heritage trees in schoools provide various long-term benefits for the school, teachers, and the students.  Photo from the presentation of Mr. Nolito Roque Alvarez from Alabang Elementary School. MANILA, 4 October 2021 —  The 64th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” featured elementary schools that are stewards of heritage trees within their campuses, highlighting educational, social, cultural, historical, and aesthetic value of native landmark trees in our communities.   The online conversation, conceptualized and hosted by a three-term Senator, now Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda gathered guests including Mr. Adolf P. Aguilar and Ms. Gina Rullamas from the Department of Education’s Bureau of Learner Support Services – Youth Formation Division (BLSS-YFD); Ms. Jenelyn Alberto from Kaligayahan Elementary School (Division of Quezon City); Mr. Nolito Roque Alvarez from Alabang Elementary School (Division of Muntinlupa City); Mr. Rodolfo Cardinez Jr. from Carcarmay Elementary School (Division of La Union); and Ms. Freida Cawaling from Albasan Elementary School (Division of Aklan). Climate Change Commissioner Rachel Herrera joined as co-host.   Mr. Aguilar and Ms. Rullamas introduced the ‘Search for Heritage Trees in Public Schools,’ a program of DepEd BLSS-YFD that aims to revive the accounting and inventory of these living historical artifacts in all public schools nationwide and intensify the preservation of the country’s vast biodiversity.   “Sa nangyari sa pandemic ngayon na ‘yung mga learning spaces natin ay nasa tahanan na, it is a good opportunity for DepEd and for us educators to bring environmental education to homes and communities this time. Kaya ang YES-O, National Greening Program namin, Gulayan sa Paaralan sa DepEd, ay dito na namin dinadala ang advocacy at pag-create ng mga immediate actions for the environment. Ang YFD ay patuloy lamang sa pag-promote ng mga advocacies na ito para sa kalikasan,” said Mr. Aguilar   “Heritage trees act as a shield during natural phenomena. They also provide homes to wildlife and keep our planet cool. Heritage trees also provide clean air and water, wood for construction and energy, and food and medicine,” said Ms. Rullamas, enumerating the many benefits of heritage trees.   The guest DepEd teachers shared their school’s efforts in protecting and preserving their century-old native trees on their respective school campuses.   “Ang gusto naming mangyari ay hindi lang ito basta maging kwento, gusto namin na maranasan rin nila ‘yung mga na-experience namin noong bata pa kami na umaakyat kami sa puno at nae-enjoy naming kainin ang mga bunga nito. Mas magandang hindi lang siya nakikita sa libro at itinuturo lang through video presentation sa schools. As much as possible, we let our students experience kung gaano kasarap tumambay sa ilalim ng puno. Iba pa rin ‘yung first-hand na nae-experience nila kasi mas magiging malalim ang appreciation nila. Ipinapakita namin ‘yung historical significance ng puno at kung gaano kaganda at kabuti na mayroon pa ring naiiwan na mga ganitong puno sa paligid natin despite of the development and economic improvement natin. Sana po ay patuloy tayong umunlad pero huwag nating pabayaan ang kalikasan,” said Ms. Alberto.   “Let’s all be like a tree: Stay grounded or focus; Connected with your root, or don’t forget where you came from; Turn over a new leaf, don’t be stagnant, be brave to do new things; Bend before you break or be flexible; Enjoy your unique natural beauty, enjoy life and what you are; and Keep growing, improve yourself. A tree will always serve as our reminder while reaching for our goals in life,” said Mr. Alvarez.   “Our tree stands as a living monument for the victory of Carcarmay folks in their efforts to guard the tree from despoilers of nature. It serves as an inspiration for young people to nurture and love a tree. It encourages the youth to hold on to their strong beliefs, hopes, and aspirations and be resilient to any circumstances,” said Mr. Cardinez.   “The towering rare cluster century-old acacia trees have been certified by the Provincial Environment and Natural Resources Office of Aklan and considered as one of the famous attractions in the Municipality of Numancia. Its roots hold and secure water underneath so that, in times of drought or when the water runs out, it can provide a much needed water supply to plants under it. Locals used it as a sustainable resource to increase the productivity of other cultivations. Acacia has also been used in medicines, baking ingredients, tools, and woodwork. By preserving our century-old trees, ecological value and diversity were observed towards promoting a sustainable way of living,” said Ms. Cawaling.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
October 04, 2021 Monday
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CCC, OMLC convene climate change webinar for the youth
MANILA, 29 September 2021 — To facilitate knowledge exchange and deepen the understanding and appreciation of the youth on climate science and climate change, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) in partnership with the Oscar M. Lopez (OML) Center spearheaded the Kaalamang Klima: A Climate Change Webinar-Workshop for the Youth held last September 22 via online platforms.   The webinar featured lectures from climate experts Dr. Rodel Lasco, Executive Director of the OML Center; Dr. Emma E. Porio, Project Leader and Principal Investigator of Coastal Cities at Risk: Investing in Climate and Disaster Resilience (CCARPH), Ateneo de Manila University; and Dr. Noralene Uy, member, experts pool, National Resilience Council and Researcher and International Recovery Platform Secretariat, on the basics and science of climate change and climate action.   "The climate is changing due to human activities--that is the conclusion of the IPCC report. It will be much worse in the future if we don't do anything about it. It is still in our hands, we can still do something about it, and therefore, we must do something about it. This is the challenge I leave with you, the youth, you are in the forefront of addressing the challenge of climate change," said Dr. Lasco.   “We are located in the Pacific ring of fire, but this region is also the most dynamic region. There's rising prosperity and also widening inequality, so we must contribute to constructing a resilient and sustainable future wherein everyone can claim their own space to be safe, to create, and to produce,” said Dr. Porio.   “I would like to invite the future generation to contribute in whatever you can to climate action through mitigation, adaptation, and resilience building. You can do action, but first and foremost, be a climate-literate person by joining a forum like this and understand the essential principle of the Earth’s climate system as well as climate and disaster risks,” said Dr. Uy.   To engage deeper with the youth, Ms. Lea Guerrero, Greenpeace Philippines Country Director, and Mr. Julio Galvez Tan, Center for Empowerment and Resource Development Executive Director, shared their experiences in raising climate awareness initiatives on the ground, and challenged the youth to take a more active role in addressing the climate crisis.   "We have excitement over the growing movement of youth during these days na kailangan na talaga nating umaksyon kasi maliit na yung window of opportunity to address the climate crisis. Ang pinakamahalagang solusyon is for us to stand in solidarity to mobilize, to join these actions, para makinig na ang mga korporasyon at mag-transform into green and just recovery para ma-address ang climate crisis," said Ms. Guerrero.   "My challenge to the youth: what will be your contribution to address the impacts of climate change for our fishers and farmers? How can we make the livelihoods of farmers and fishers resilient to climate change?  I'm urging you to act NOW,” said Mr. Tan.   Deputy Speaker and Antique Representative Loren Legarda, National Youth Commission Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer Ryan Enriquez, and CCC Commissioner Rachel Anne Herrera also delivered their messages during the program.   "We've seen the effects of the old normal to nature, our planet, and our climate. Returning to the old ways of waste, pollution, and overconsumption should never be an option. We must seize the opportunity to responsibly manage our environment and to lead the way towards a resilient, green, and sustainable development,” said Deputy Speaker Legarda.   "Ngayon pa lang ay dapat tayong makialam at sumali sa usapin ng climate change. Dapat tayong humanap ng solusyon sa malaking problema na ito habang pwede pa itong bigyan ng lunas. Huwag nating hintaying lumubog ang ating paligid, masira ang kalikasan, mapaso ang ating mundo, at mamatay ang marami dahil sa climate change," said Usec. Enriquez.   "Climate change conversations should go far beyond rising temperatures, the 1.5-degree threshold, or the newest technologies. It also has a lot to do about understanding our history or how this came about, what is our responsibility as a sector, and the values that we have to uphold. Climate change understanding is formative, because at the end of the day, it is thinking beyond the present, thinking beyond oneself, and valuing the lives of others," said Herrera.   With more than 400 youth participated through Zoom and Facebook Live, the activity aims to tap youth support for the second edition of the Klima Film Festival this year, which targets to mainstream the effects of climate change through films written and produced by the Filipino youth.
September 29, 2021 Wednesday
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House OKs 145M budget of CCC; solon seeks augmentation to implement more climate adaptation, mitigation strategies
In photo: Secretary Emmanuel de Guzman (fourth from left), Kabataan Partylist Representative Sarah Jane Elago(fifth from left), and Zamboanga City 2nd District Representative Mannix Dalipe (sixth from left). MANILA, 29 September 2021 – The Climate Change Commission (CCC) welcomed the approval by the House of Representatives of its budget for Fiscal Year 2022 amounting to a little over Php 145 million. “As Vice Chair of Committee on Appropriations, it is my distinct honor and privilege to sponsor the budget proposal of the Climate Change Commission for Fiscal Year 2022,” said Zamboanga City 2nd District Representative Manuel Jose "Mannix" M. Dalipe during the budget deliberation last Thursday, September 23. The approved CCC budget for 2022 was 3.37% lower than the agency’s budget for the current year which amounted to Php 150.47 million pesos, for the delivery of capacity building initiatives of the Commission, monitoring and evaluation, and production of information, education, and communication materials. Representative Dalipe expressed his view that the budget of the climate body is insufficient, and that the agency would welcome any additional support or funding to effectively and properly implement additional programs on climate change. “Madam Speaker, we hope that the House of Representatives will exhaust all means to fund the six million cut from the original proposed budget of the CCC to fund very important projects – capacity building [and] information education, specially at the grassroots level. ‘Yun po ‘yung kinakailangan para hindi lang iilan ‘yung nag-uusap tungkol sa planetary emergency o sa usaping pang-klima, kung hindi para matiyak natin na ‘yung tao mismo, ‘yung humahawak ng kapangyarihan [at] gumagalaw sa kanilang mga komunidad [ay capacitated] para [matiyak] na magiging matagumpay lahat ng pinapatupad natin na climate mitigation and adaptation strategies,” Kabataan Partylist Representative Sarah Jane Elago appealed during her interpelation. CCC Secretary Emmanuel M. De Guzman expressed appreciation to Rep. Dalipe for the sponsorship of the agency’s budget. “The Climate Change Commission deeply thanks Rep. Mannix Dalipe (2nd District, Zamboanga City) for his successful sponsorship of its agency budget for 2022, with a motion for augmentation from Rep Sarah Elago, at today’s House plenary.  The budget allocation for CCC is P145 million, representing 0.004% of the total national government budget of P3.351 trillion,” he said. The Climate Change Commission is the lead policy-making body of the government tasked to coordinate, monitor and evaluate government programs and ensure mainstreaming of climate change in national, local, and sectoral development plans towards a climate-resilient and climate-smart Philippines. To know more about the CCC, visit its social media handles, www. facebook.com/CCCPhl, www.instagram.com/CCCphl and on Twitter at @CCCPhl, or visit its website at climate.gov.ph.
September 29, 2021 Wednesday
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CCC welcomes ASEAN-China mangrove eco-corridor, calls for stronger cooperation on climate action across sectors and the region
MANILA, 28 September 2021 – The Climate Change Commission welcomed the establishment of the ASEAN-China Mangrove Eco-corridor and called for stronger cooperation on climate action across different sectors and across countries in the region during the NGO Forum, one of eight parallel forums of the Fifteenth Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP 15), held in Kunming, China on Monday, September 27.   Commissioner Rachel Anne Herrera, who participated virtually and gave the sub-forum’s opening address, said the Philippines “welcomes and lauds the establishment of an ASEAN-China Mangrove Eco-Corridor.”   “Mangroves form a “first line of defense” that protects our inland and coastal communities especially during typhoons. In terms of climate mitigation, mangrove ecosystems also have immense carbon sequestration potential, compared to many forest ecosystems,” Herrera explained.   “As long as mangrove restoration activities align with science to use the proper native species, site selection, and nursery management, and engages in a transparent manner with stakeholders, these are no-regrets, high-impact measures that benefit any community,” she added, noting that mangroves in China, India, Mexico, the US, and Vietnam avert as much as 57 billion USD in flooding damages per year.   In his opening address, China’s Special Envoy for Climate Change Affairs and Global Climate Action Initiative Co-chair Xie Zhenhua also emphasized the importance of nature-based solutions, which “rely on the power of nature to address climate risks through ecological conservation, restoration, and management.” Xie likewise emphasized the important role of the region in mangrove conservation.   “The ASEAN-China region, with coverage of more than a third of the world’s mangrove areas, or over 4.3 million hectares, is the largest mangrove forest area in the world,” Xie said. He lamented, however, that difficulties in conservation persist because of continued conversion of mangrove forests to aquaculture ponds, agricultural expansion, and charcoal production, among others.   While noting that China and ASEAN member-states are all developing countries that face challenges in balancing economic development and mangrove conservation, he emphasized that the region has been actively cooperating on the issue for several years through dialogues, exchanges, experience-sharing, and collaboration.   “Such regional cooperation can play a crucial role in global mangrove and marine biodiversity conservation, sustaining the livelihoods and well-being of coastal communities, climate change mitigation and adaptation, and the achievement of regional sustainable development,” Xie said.   The parallel forum was hosted by the Global Climate Action Initiative, the ASEAN-China Centre, and the China Environmental Protection, and was organized by the Global Environmental Institute, the Society of Entrepreneurs and Ecology Foundation, and the Mangrove Conservation Foundation.   ASEAN-China Centre Secretary General Chen Dehai and Dr. Chen Guangchen, Researcher of the Third Institute of Oceanography, Ministry of Natural Resources of China, gave the forum’s keynote speeches. This was followed by a roundtable discussion on the status and conservation gap of ASEAN-China mangroves, with Department of Environment and Natural Resources Biodiversity Management Bureau's Director Datu Tungko Saikol sharing ongoing efforts of the government on mangrove conservation and rehabilitation and identifying gaps that hinder effective implementation of the country's initiatives; case study discussions on community-based conservation in Myanmar, mangrove protection practices in Indonesia, and the work of NGOs in China on mangrove protection.   In their addresses, both Xie and Herrera emphasized the importance of stronger cooperation not just across countries in the region, but across all sectors.   “Ecosystem conservation and addressing climate change require cooperation of all sectors of society, including central and local governments at all levels, as well as businesses, non-governmental organizations, and research institutions,” Xie said.   “One government, one region alone cannot implement the interventions needed and succeed. We will need to sustain and strengthen public-private partnerships, and tap civil society, academia, and other development partners so that our plans can be realized by more individuals and communities,” Herrera said, citing as a primary example, the work of the ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity as pivotal to the region’s whole-of-community approach to the cross-cutting issues of biodiversity loss and climate change.           Herrera also expressed hope that cooperation through the eco-corridor initiative will carry over to the other shared issues in the region.   “Cooperation on this front can help our region and China move towards a resilient recovery from the global pandemic,” she said.   “We hope this initiative will also strengthen and intensify ASEAN-China cooperation on the many other areas of concerns in the region, and bring about similar solutions to growing problems like plastic pollution, marine litter, and solid waste management,” Herrera concluded.
September 28, 2021 Tuesday
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CCC: Reduce GHG emissions by reducing food loss and waste
MANILA, 28 September 2021 — In celebration of the International Day of Awareness of Food Loss and Waste tomorrow, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) urges the public to practice sustainable food management to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from food loss and waste.   September 29 is designated as the International Day of Awareness of Food Loss and Waste through UN Resolution 74/209, which aims to highlight the food loss and waste problem and their possible solutions. The observance also put the spotlight on the promotion of global efforts towards meeting Sustainable Development Goal 12 or the Responsible Consumption and Production.   Food loss refers to the portion of food that is lost from harvest, but not reaching the retail level. Food waste refers to the portion of a product that is discarded at the consumer or retail level.   The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) estimates that globally, around 14 percent of food produced is lost between harvest and retail. An estimated 17 percent of total global food production is wasted in retail and at the consumption level (11 percent in households, 5 percent in the food service, and 2 percent in retail). The food that is lost and wasted accounts for 38 percent of total energy usage in the global food system.   Disposing food loss and waste in landfills emits GHGs, which contribute to climate change. Food loss and waste can also negatively impact the food supply, and influence the cost of food.   This year’s theme, “Stop Food Loss and waste, for the people, for the planet,” calls for the prioritization of action and move ahead with innovation to reduce food loss and waste towards the transformation of the food systems.   The CCC emphasizes that this move will significantly reduce GHG emissions, and will contribute to food security and nutrition, lowering pressure on water and land resources, and can increase productivity and economic growth.   With this, the Commission urges all to save food and reduce food waste by practicing to:                                                                                      1.    Adopt a healthier, more sustainable diet; 2.    Buy only what you can consume; 3.    Bring home leftovers or share large dishes at restaurants (depending on the COVID-19 status); 4.    Refrigerate your leftovers or use it as an ingredient in another meal; 5.    Compost your food waste; 6.    Support local food producers; and 7.    Donate food that would otherwise be wasted.   The CCC said that the COVID-19 pandemic is a wake-up call to transform and rebalance the way our food is produced and consumed. These little changes to our habits – wasting less, eating better and adopting a sustainable lifestyle – if started today, can make a huge impact in setting our communities and the world free from hunger.
September 28, 2021 Tuesday
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Philippines’ Heritage Trees in Schools in 64th episode of ‘Stories for a Better Normal’ Series
MANILA, 28 September 2021 — The 64th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways” will feature Department of Education (DepEd) teachers and Bureau of Learner Support Services – Youth Formation Division (BLSS-YFD) officers to showcase public schools that exert efforts in preserving Heritage Trees.   The online conversation, conceptualized by DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS) and hosted by a three-term former Senator, now Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 30 September 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CCCPhl, facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda, and facebook.com/DepartmentOfEducation.PH. Two lucky viewers can win tablets by tuning in throughout the program.   Joining the online conversation are Mr. Adolf P. Aguilar and Ms. Gina Rullamas of DepEd BLSS-YFD, Ms. Jenelyn Alberto from Kaligayahan Elementary School (Division of Quezon City), Mr. Nolito Roque Alvarez from Alabang Elementary School (Division of Muntinlupa City), Mr. Rodolfo Cardinez Jr. from Carcarmay Elementary School (Division of La Union), and Ms. Freida Cawaling from Albasan Elementary School (Division of Aklan).   Despite the important role biodiversity is playing, particularly in supporting current and future human health, well-being, economic prosperity, and ecological balance, it is still being destroyed at an unprecedented and accelerating rate.   Heritage trees, which are characterized as healthy native or endemic, rare, threatened, and endangered with a minimum girth of 100 centimeters with scientific, rarity, historical, cultural, social, educational, and aesthetic significance, are now recognized as key resources that sustain broad and unique assemblages of species. But these trees are threatened by urban development, natural hazards, and vandalism, among others.   With this, the DepEd Office of Undersecretary for Administration through BLSS-YFD spearheaded the ‘Search for Heritage Trees in Public Schools’ to revive the accounting and inventory of these living historical artifacts in all public schools nationwide as one of its initiatives on intensifying the preservation of the country’s vast biodiversity.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
September 28, 2021 Tuesday
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Philippine Heritage Trees sa mga paaralan, tuklasin sa ika-64 na episode ng seryeng ‘Stories for a Better Normal’
MAYNILA, ika-28 ng Setyembre 2021 – Magtitipon-tipon virtually ang ilan sa mga guro at Bureau of Learner Support Services – Youth Formation Division (BLSS-YFD) officers mula sa Kagawaran ng Edukasyon (DepEd) upang ibida ang mga pampublikong paaralan na nangangalaga ng mga Heritage Tree sa ika-64 na episode ng seryeng ‘Stories for a Better Normal’: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways”.   Ang online na talakayan, na hango sa konsepto ng DepEd Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS) at pangungunahan ng three-term Senator, at ngayo’y Deputy Speaker at Antique Representative Loren Legarda, ay ipapalabas sa Huwebes, ika-30 ng Setyembre 2021, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live sa facebook.com/CCCPhl, facebook.com/iamlorenlegarda, at facebook.com/DepartmentOfEducation.PH. Dalawang masuwerteng manonood ang maaaring manalo ng mga tablet sa pamamagitan ng pag-tune in sa buong programa.   Kasama sa naturang online na talakayan sina Mr. Adolf P. Aguilar at Ms. Gina Rullamas ng DepEd BLSS-YFD; Ms. Jenelyn Alberto mula sa Kaligayahan Elementary School (Division of Quezon City); Mr. Nolito Roque Alvarez mula sa Alabang Elementary School (Division of La Union); at Ms. Freida Cawaling mula sa Albasan Elementary School (Division of Aklan).   Sa kabila ng mahalagang papel na ginagampanan ng biodiversity, partikular sa pagsuporta sa kasalukuyan at hinaharap na kalusugan ng tao, kapakanan, kaunlaran sa ekonomiya, at ecological balance, ito’y nasisira pa rin sa isang hindi pa naaabot-gunitang pangyayari at bumibilis na antas.   Ang mga heritage tree, na kilala sa kanilang katutubong kalusugan, pagiging natatangi, threatened, at endangered na may minimum girth na 100 centimeters na may katangi-tangi, makasaysayan, pangkultura, panlipunan, pang-edukasyon, pang-agham at aesthetic significance, ay ngayo’y kinikilala bilang pangunahing yaman na kumakatawan sa malawak at kakaibang pagtitipon ng mga species. Ngunit ang mga punong ito ay nanganganib dahil sa urbanisasyon, natural hazards at vandalism, maliban sa iba pang mga alalahanin.   Kaugnay nito, pinangunahan ng DepEd Office of Undersecretary for Administration sa tulong ng BLSS-YFD ang ‘Search for Heritage Trees in Public Schools’ upang muling buhayin ang pagkilala at pagsisinop ng mga nabubuhay at makasaysayang mga artifacts sa lahat ng mga pampublikong paaralan sa buong bansa bilang isa sa mga hakbangin sa pagpapaigting ng pangangalaga sa biodiversity ng ating bansa.   Bilang isang online na talakayan upang maisulong ang kalusugan, kamalayang pang-kapaligiran, at mga kasanayan sa pakiki-angkop sa klima, naglalayon ang “Stories for a Better Normal” na baguhin ang kaisipan ng bawat Pilipino, mga pamilya at pamayanan sa pamamagitan ng pagpapakita ng mga paraan kung paano maisasakatuparan ang ‘better normal’ sa loob ng ating mga pamayanan.   Ang online na talakayan na ito ay na-organisa sa pagtutulungan ng tanggapan ni Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda at ng Climate Change Commission, na binigyang-suporta naman ng Department of Education, Philippine Information Agency, Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines at Mother Earth Foundation.
September 28, 2021 Tuesday
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CCC supports Save Sierra Madre Day celebration
MANILA, 25 September 2021 – In celebration of “Save Sierra Madre Day” tomorrow, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) highlights the importance of preserving our forests, as well as protecting, managing, and regenerating our country's natural resources.   September 26th of every year is observed as Save Sierra Madre Day by virtue of Proclamation No. 413 to remind Filipinos of the dangers which a lack of concern and action for the Sierra Madre Mountains may bring about. It commemorates the day in 2009 when Tropical Storm Ondoy brought heavy rains and massive flooding in Metro Manila and surrounding provinces, causing widespread deaths and destruction. The disaster was attributed to the continued deforestation, degradation, and destruction of the Sierra Madre Mountains.   The Sierra Madre plays an important role in meeting Metro Manila’s major water supply demands, as well as those of the immediate surrounding provinces of Cagayan, Isabela, Nueva Vizcaya, Nueva Ecija, Quirino, Aurora, Quezon, Rizal, Laguna, and Bulacan.   More importantly, the mountain range has long acted as one of Luzon’s most reliable buffer areas against typhoons that originate from the Pacific Ocean, reducing the wind speeds of potentially destructive storms.   However, Sierra Madre is becoming increasingly vulnerable as extractive activities like illegal logging, illegal mining, road construction, and land conversion to agricultural use and population areas continue to diminish its forests and ecosystems.   With this, the CCC urges everyone to be more conscious of our connection and relationship with nature, which includes learning how to consume only what we need, caring for the forests and trees, and opposing projects that might destruct the Sierra Madre.   The CCC encourages all sectors of the society to participate in activities geared toward the conservation of the Sierra Madre Mountains, which include tree planting activities, beautification and cleanliness of our forests and parks, garbage segregation and efficient waste management, and conserving water and energy.
September 25, 2021 Saturday
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