Get ready, be updated. Bringing you the latest news about the Climate Change Commission.
 


 

Representatives from eight countries participate in the regional training workshop on National Adaptation Plan development and implementation organized by the Asian Institute of Technology, Regional Resource Centre for Asia and the Pacific BANGKOK, 17 June 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) participated in a recently concluded training workshop on National Adaptation Plan (NAP) development and implementation in a bid to strengthen the country’s capacity to formulate and implement its NAP. Organized by the Asian Institute of Technology, Regional Resource Centre for Asia and the Pacific (AIT RRC.AP), in collaboration with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the Asia Pacific Adaptation Network (APAN), the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT), the Asian Disaster Preparedness Center (ADPC), and Japan’s Ministry of the Environment, the workshop aimed to strengthen the NAP development and implementation capacities of participants. The workshop provided practical, internationally tested models, methodologies and tools for the NAP process in the Asia-Pacific region. The Philippines, having submitted its NAP to the UNFCCC on 30 May 2024, presented its climatic impact drivers, key sectoral outcomes, and key strategies for effective climate adaptation action. The Philippines shared best practices and emphasized the significance of collaboration among countries. Secretary Robert E.A. Borje, Vice Chairperson and Executive Director of the CCC, underscored the importance of building regional capacities on implementing NAPs. "Capacity building on National Adaptation Plans is essential for the Asia-Pacific region which is highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Strengthening our individual and collective capacities to develop and implement NAPs is rightly an objective and instrument of policy to build resilience. By enhancing our knowledge and capabilities, we can better prepare for future climate impacts and further strengthen the foundation for a more resilient and sustainable region," he stated. The workshop, attended by 26 participants from eight countries, including the Philippines, offered understanding and awareness of the key NAP elements, support channels, and their links to other national processes, as well as practical guidelines for the effective formulation and implementation of NAPs. The workshop also focused on the mobilization of climate finance, which will aid the Philippines in translating actionable NAP strategies into concrete steps toward localization and implementation. Held from 11 to 13 June 2024, the workshop underscored the importance of regional cooperation and the exchange of knowledge and experiences in tackling climate change adaptation. The AIT RRC.AP is dedicated to enhancing adaptation planning and implementation in developing countries, playing a pivotal role in organizing such capacity-building workshops. This commitment is crucial in fostering a collaborative environment where countries can directly collaborate and workshop on essential aspects of the NAP, from development processes to mobilizing climate finance. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
June 17, 2024 Monday
Manila, Philippines — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) highlighted the significant intersection of faith and climate change as it joined the Muslim community in the celebration of Eid al-Adha. Eid al-Adha, also known as the Feast of Sacrifice, is a time of reflection, devotion, and unity for Muslims worldwide. The spirit of Eid al-Adha, which emphasizes sacrifice and stewardship, resonates with the principles of environmental conservation and sustainable living. The CCC recognized that these values are pivotal in addressing the global climate crisis. Secretary Robert Borje, Vice Chair and Executive Director of CCC, emphasized the importance of integrating faith-based approaches in the fight against climate change. “The values of compassion, stewardship, and communal responsibility that are taught by Islam support national transformative climate action. The Muslim regions in Mindanao, one of the country’s areas most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, have a crucial role in leading sustainable practices and resilience-building efforts,” he stated. Borje highlighted the importance of community-driven climate solutions, stating, “Our Muslim brothers and sisters have long practiced sustainable agricultural and fishing methods. By supporting and amplifying these traditional practices, we can foster a more resilient and sustainable future. Faith-based climate action is not only possible but essential in our shared mission to combat climate change.” The CCC continues to engage with various sectors, including religious communities, to promote inclusive and comprehensive climate action strategies.   For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
June 17, 2024 Monday
MANILA, 17 June 2024 — In observance of the World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) called on Filipinos to engage in effective land restoration and water management to enhance resilience against these environmental challenges. Desertification is the degradation of land resulting primarily from climatic variations and human activities. It reduces soil’s ability to support crops, which leads to lower yields and increased food scarcity. Drought, on the other hand, is a natural phenomenon characterized by a prolonged period of abnormally low rainfall that leads to a shortage of water. It affects drinking water supplies, agriculture, and industrial activities. With climate change, desertification and droughts are expected to worsen and intensify. This loss affects ecosystems' ability to function and provide essential services. The degradation of land and water resources leads to malnutrition, poverty, and displacement, particularly in vulnerable communities in developing regions. According to the United Nations, up to 40 percent of the world's land is already considered degraded. Degraded lands release stored carbon into the atmosphere, which contributes to climate change. The CCC urged the public to take concerted action in land restoration and water management to reduce the impacts of these threats, and in effect, climate change. “Addressing desertification and drought is crucial for our nation’s resilience and food security,” said Secretary Robert Borje, CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director. “We must act collectively to restore degraded lands and manage our water resources sustainably.” Officially declared by the UN General Assembly in 1994 (A/RES/49/115), the World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought is observed every June 17th. It aims to promote public awareness of the issues linked to desertification, land degradation and drought and to showcase human-led solutions to prevent desertification and reverse intensifying droughts. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
June 17, 2024 Monday
MANILA, 10 June 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) highlighted the critical need for ramped up conservation efforts to protect the Philippines’ mountain regions as the nation observes the Month of the Mountains this June. The CCC emphasized the importance of policies and plans that prioritize the long-term resilience of mountain regions in the face of a changing climate. “It is crucial for the government and communities to work together to implement and ramp up adaptation strategies that will help safeguard both mountains and the people who call these regions home,” said Secretary Robert E.A. Borje, CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director. The Philippines’ first National Adaptation Plan (NAP) for 2023-2050, completed and submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) under the administration of President Ferdinand R. Marcos, Jr., underscores the sustainable management of ecosystems, including mountains, as a priority for climate adaptation. The NAP outlines strategies to enhance the adaptive capacities of these areas against climate change impacts. These include the strengthening of critical infrastructure, the development of new income opportunities,  livelihood diversification, the implementation of nature-based solutions, access to climate data, and capacity building for local and community governance and action. As the Philippines commemorates the Month of the Mountains, the CCC called for increased engagement and action towards conservation of mountain ecosystems. The CCC encouraged the public to support local conservation initiatives, participate in reforestation projects, and contribute to broader efforts to combat climate change. "Let’s continue to raise awareness and mobilize action for the conservation and sustainable management of our mountain regions, not just for this month. We urge everyone to join us in these efforts to ensure the resilience and sustainability of our mountains for the current and future generations," Borje said. Mountains support biodiversity and ecological systems by providing vital resources such as water and food. They also serve as natural barriers that reduce the wind speed of destructive typhoons and contribute to flood control and soil erosion prevention. Equally important, mountains hold significant cultural value and play a substantial role in local and national economies through tourism, agriculture, and other industries. The Philippines is home to over 2,700 mountains. These include mountain ranges such as the Sierra Madre and the Cordillera Central. Mountains like Mount Pulag, Mount Kitanglad, and Mount Kanlaon are renowned for their unique ecosystems and popularity as hiking destinations. However, mountains are not exempt from the impacts of climate change. Rising temperatures, increased heavy rainfall, and extreme weather events threaten the stability and health of these vital regions. These changes pose significant risks not only to the natural environment but also to the communities that rely on mountains for livelihoods. The CCC reaffirms its commitment to implement policies that protect the beauty and bounty of mountains and the communities that depend on them. Presidential Proclamation No. 176 declared June the Month of the Mountains to highlight the conservation, protection, and sustainable management practices of the Philippine mountains. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
June 10, 2024 Monday
MANILA, 10 June 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) emphasized the importance of collective action and solidarity to address ecological degradation and restore the health of Philippine ecosystems on the occasion of World Environment Day. The CCC highlighted the urgency of involving all Filipinos in efforts to restore and protect the country’s natural resources, particularly its forests, wetlands, flat lands, and marine ecosystems.  As one of the 18 mega-biodiverse countries in the world, the Philippines is home to a wide variety of biodiversity-nurturing ecosystems, such as wetlands, tree forests, mangrove forests, and coral reefs, which nurture between 70 and 80 percent of the world’s plant and animal species.  These ecosystems are essential to the livelihoods of many Filipinos, supporting agriculture and aquaculture. However, the country faces several issues that contribute to ecosystem degradation, such as climate change, pollution, sea and land-use conversion, sea-level rise, illegal mining, deforestation, and droughts. The aquaculture and agriculture sectors continue to face challenges. According to the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources’ Comprehensive Post-Harvest, Marketing, and Ancillary Industries Plan 2018-2022, factors such as the degradation of fishery habitats and climate change have caused a decline in the fishing sector in recent years.  In 2023, President Ferdinand R. Marcos Jr. raised concerns as the country continues to lose 457 tons of quality soil annually due to erosion and degradation. Secretary Robert E.A. Borje, CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director, explained that the active involvement of all Filipinos in ecological and climate change issues allows climate plans to accumulate diverse perspectives, ultimately helping with the development of sustainable solutions. “Collective action on climate change and ecological protection and restoration is crucial for a sustainable and climate-smart Philippines. Involving everyone in the climate agenda ensures a whole of society approach to address climate change and ecological degradation. We need to work together to promote the development of long-term solutions and strengthen the resilience and cohesiveness of Filipino society in the face of climate change challenges,” he said. Borje also noted that “engaging all sectors in climate action fosters ecological literacy and empowers Filipinos of all ages and backgrounds to contribute to sustainable practices, programs, initiatives, and policies.” Borje also urged support for policies and programs under President Ferdinand R. Marcos, Jr. meant to establish an enabling environment for a more climate resilient Philippines.  The Philippines’ very first National Adaptation Plan (NAP) was completed under the Marcos Administration and submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. NAP identifies strategies to prevent the degradation of Philippine ecosystems and biodiversity. Similarly, the Philippine Development Plan 2023-2028 outlines strategies to protect the country’s natural resources through strengthened monitoring, protection, management, awareness-building, and rehabilitation. President Marcos Jr. recently signed the Philippine Ecosystem and Natural Capital Accounting System (PENCAS) Act, aimed to enhance ecological balance and climate resilience through natural resource accounting. This law aligns the country's economic policies with sustainable practices to reflect the President's vision of a climate-smart and climate-resilient Philippines. The CCC remains active in its efforts to support the country in protecting and restoring its natural resources and ecosystems. By proactively reviewing, advocating, and supporting pro-climate and pro-environment policies, the Commission aims to support the preservation of ecosystems, reduction of pollution, and sustainable management of natural resources to minimize degradation. June 5 marks the annual celebration of World Environment Day. Led by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), World Environment Day raises awareness about environmental issues. This year’s theme, 'Our Land, Our Future. We are #GenerationRestoration,' focuses on addressing urgent issues of land degradation, desertification, and drought resilience. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
June 10, 2024 Monday
By: Paul Angelo Juan, Jean Paula Regulano, and Jerome Ilagan BONN, GERMANY, 10 June 2024 — In the face of the intensifying effects of climate change, countries are confronted with differentiated and disproportionate impacts. Developing countries contributing the least to global greenhouse gas emissions are those most affected, vulnerable and at-risk to climate change. With limited resources, developing countries face difficulty in immediately addressing the multifaceted issues posed by climate change. These challenges strengthen the resolve of developing countries like the Philippines to participate in international climate negotiations such as the Conference of Parties (COP) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The Philippines needs to ensure our voices are heard and our unique national circumstances are considered in global roadmaps to climate resilience, low-carbon, and sustainable development. The UNFCCC is a platform for developed and developing countries to tackle actions that would address the climate crisis. Since the birth of UNFCCC in 1995, and the first COP in the same year, countries have been engaged in an intense yet nuanced negotiation process to address the climate crisis, develop global norms, frameworks and programs to bring down solutions tailored to national circumstances that will directly benefit the communities. Every year, the COP and the Subsidiary Bodies (SB) of the UNFCCC meet twice, in June and in November, to stocktake progress in critical climate discussions such as the provision of support for developing countries, in the form of climate finance, technology development and transfer, and capacity building. This is the crux of the negotiations process, with developing countries facing the need to safeguard the decisions across negotiation workstreams and between sessions. As decisions shape the dynamics of support modalities, the inclusive process of “asserting climate justice and equity, and historical responsibilities” is a product of continuing coordination with various entities within or outside of government in terms of legal rights, policy directions, data on financial resources, including regard for vulnerable sectors. The stakes are high for the Philippines. The UNFCCC and the Paris Agreement are cornerstones of possible solutions to augment limited domestic resources to fund current needs, albeit still at a limited capacity. The need to adapt to increasingly threatening scenarios due to climate impact drivers such as extreme precipitation, sea level rise, extreme temperature, is costly, and amounts to addressing existential threats. From its membership to the UNFCCC in 1995, the Philippines has achieved a myriad of successes in the international climate negotiation – from its significant contributions in developing solutions packages such as the Green Climate Fund, to the most recent inclusion in the agenda item of loss and damage to the adoption of the Loss and Damage Fund and Funding Arrangements.   In COP28 last year, the Philippines was one of the last few countries standing in the deliberation of the first Global Stocktake outcomes which informs countries of course- correcting measures towards resilience and sustainable development. Under the leadership of President Ferdinand R. Marcos, Jr., the Philippines’ participation in climate talks is anchored on its Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC), the first National Adaptation Plan (NAP) completed only under the Marcos administration, and the groundbreaking 2023-2028 Philippine Development Plan, which for the first time has a dedicated chapter on climate change and disaster resilience. Advancements in domestic policies and measures increases the number of workstreams participated by the Philippines, which now includes: adaptation, mitigation, loss and damage, climate finance, technology, capacity building, global stocktake, just transition, gender, local communities and indigenous peoples, agriculture, response measures, and transparency. The Philippines works to ensure that it protects its space at the negotiating table. It amplifies the voices of developing nations and, with its bridging abilities, allows the opportunity to draw stakeholders to the center and restore trust and confidence in the multilateral process. Under the Marcos Administration, the Philippines is now occupying historic seats in constituted bodies, such as the Adaptation Committee, the Paris Committee on Capacity Building, the Loss and Damage Fund Transitional Committee and the Fund Board. The Philippines also has its seat in the Green Climate Fund Board. The point of no return looks at the threshold of 2050 net zero to face either a livable earth, or extinction of the human race. Our next challenge is to increase the tribe of innovators, climate scientists, climate advocates and champions, so that the Philippine efforts of today will inform and be sustained through to the next generation. And so we negotiate to champion not just what the Philippines deserves as a matter of climate justice. We know that smaller countries or similarly situated economies learn from us, and our state of action in facing with resolve the climate crisis. SB and COP negotiations place the Philippines, among other developing countries, at the center of climate discussions aimed at securing lives, livelihoods, and the future of people and communities, with no one left behind. With outcomes embedded in national policies, action plans, and investment strategies, the Philippines is in a better strategic global position to achieve its objective of a climate-smart and climate-resilient nation – Bagong Pilipinas, Isang Bagong Bansang Matatag. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
June 10, 2024 Monday
BONN, Germany, June 4, 2024 – The Philippines called for urgent and transformative climate action at the joint opening plenary of the 60th Sessions of the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) and the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI). “We are now at a point of no return,” said Secretary Robert E.A. Borje, Vice Chairperson and Executive Director of the Climate Change Commission, and Co-Head of the Philippine Delegation to the 60th Sessions of Subsidiary Bodies (SB60) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). He emphasized the need for stronger and sustained momentum for climate action rooted in science, evidence, and indigenous and local knowledge. Underscoring the critical decade ahead, Borje called for significant progress towards enhanced resilience and low-carbon, sustainable development. Under the leadership of President Ferdinand R. Marcos, Jr., the Philippines has aligned its economic and prosperity agenda with climate change goals. Climate change is now integral to national policies, guiding planning, implementation, and decision-making at all levels. Borje urged nations to build on COP28 outcomes, including the Global Stocktake (GST-1) results, the UAE Global Climate Resilience Framework, and the operationalization of the Loss and Damage Fund.  He emphasized the urgency of advancing all agenda items, particularly the determination of a new collective quantified goal on climate finance. "The Philippines expresses grave concerns over the destruction caused by extreme weather events in Asia and the Pacific, Africa, and other regions. We need to change these stories of developing countries from fragility to agility," Borje said. The Philippines has recently completed its first National Adaptation Plan (NAP), becoming the third ASEAN country and the 56th in the world to submit a NAP. Driven largely by domestic resources and bilateral partnerships, the Philippines is working on the NDC Implementation Plan, Just Transition Work Programme, Biennial Transparency Report, Long Term Strategy, and NDC updating. Borje called for collective action to: Close mitigation and adaptation gaps and support the development and implementation of NAPs and NDCs by developing nations. Urgently operationalize the Loss and Damage Fund, with the Philippines ready to participate in the decision-making process. Implement the Just Transition Work Programme to uphold human rights, create green jobs, enhance livelihoods, and develop green and blue economies. Accelerate the provision, mobilization, and delivery of finance, technology, and capacity from developed to developing countries. Ensure transformative climate action for all vulnerable populations, including indigenous peoples, local communities, women and girls, children and youth, the elderly, and differently-abled individuals. With the evolving needs of developing nations, Borje underscored the need for collective action, that is transformative, long-term, and sustainable.   “But we must be clear: in our joint work, we cannot be satisfied with providing temporary reprieve for the weak, the least, and the last. This approach will only lead us to a permanent retreat, and certain perdition. This cannot and must not happen,” Borje also stressed the need for inclusive processes and universal participation to restore trust and confidence in the multilateral process of the UNFCCC. He reaffirmed the Philippines' commitment to engage all Parties and stakeholders to achieve global climate goals. “There is no turning back. We must forge ahead and move forward together for humanity’s sake, particularly for the most vulnerable and at-risk. Let us work together and create the results we want and need,” Borje declared. As one of the 198 Parties to the UNFCCC, the Philippines participates in SB60 intersessional climate negotiation. The Philippine delegation is composed of 11 agencies, including CCC, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA), Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Finance (DOF), Department of Agriculture (DA), Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA), Presidential Communication Office (PCO), and Philippine Information Agency (PIA). SB60 held in Bonn, Germany from 3 to 13 June 2024 provides a crucial platform for dialogue and negotiation leading up to COP29 in Baku, Azerbaijan.
June 04, 2024 Tuesday
The  Climate Change Commission calls for enhanced risk avoidance measures at the Pan-Asia Risk and Insurance Management Association Conference.   MANILA, 3 June 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) emphasized the crucial role of the private sector in strengthening the Philippines' national risk management capacities and stressed the importance of enhancing risk avoidance measures during the Pan-Asia Risk and Insurance Management Association (PARIMA) Conference in Manila  on May 30, 2024. The CCC emphasized the need for effective collaboration with the private sector to build a resilient nation and Asia-Pacific region capable of withstanding and addressing the escalating impacts of climate change.   In his keynote address, CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje emphasized the importance of the private sector in risk avoidance, stressing the necessity for a proactive approach to the impacts of climate change and alignment with the government’s policies and frameworks. Borje underscored the need at the outset to work together on and invest in preventive adaptation to  minimize risks related to climate change and its impacts.  While recognizing insurance as a risk transferring approach that can be supported, Borje noted the continuing importance of public and private partnership to invest in national and localized efforts for resilience.   “The private sector's role is not just in transferring risk through insurance but also in investing in preventive measures. This includes infrastructure upgrades, adoption of sustainable practices, and promotion of awareness about climate risks,” Borje added. The Philippines has incurred significant losses and damages amounting to Php 673.3 billion over the past decade due to tropical cyclones alone – more than twice the total premiums collected by the insurance industry – highlighting the urgency for innovative solutions and stronger risk management strategies. To address this, the Philippine government has established various policies and programs, including the National Climate Risk Management Framework (NCRMF) and the Philippine Development Plan 2023-2028, which integrate risk assessment, capacity building, and sustainable finance mobilization from both public and private sources. Furthermore, the draft National Adaptation Plan (NAP) and Nationally Determined Contribution Implementation Plan (NDCIP) emphasize insurance as a key strategy for enhancing resilience in agriculture, fisheries, and food security sectors. The plans aim to enhance climate insurance in the country, ensuring coverage against extreme weather events.   Borje called for a multi-pronged approach to climate action, urging the private sector to develop innovative insurance products, engage in public-private partnerships, and invest in resilience projects. “While the government has instituted measures to manage these risks, the scale and complexity of the challenges demand a collaborative approach. We need your expertise, resources, and innovative solutions to enhance our risk transfer mechanisms and build a resilient nation,” Borje stressed. PARIMA is a professional organization dedicated to advance the practice of risk management and insurance in the Asia-Pacific region, supporting risk managers through education, networking, and the sharing of best practices. It provides a platform for risk professionals to connect, collaborate, and enhance their skills in managing various types of risks, including those related to finance, operations, and strategic management. The CCC remains committed to support Filipinos in adapting to climate change challenges by promoting climate insurance and partnering with the private sector to foster a climate-resilient and climate-smart Philippines, ensuring continuity for individuals and businesses in the face of climate change-induced disasters.   For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
June 03, 2024 Monday
Climate Change Commission Vice Chair and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje meets with Japan’s Ministry of the Environment Vice Minister for Global Environmental Affairs Yutaka Matsuzawa to discuss ways to bolster climate change cooperation MANILA, 3 June 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) met with the Japanese Ministry of the Environment (MOEJ) and discussed ways to further strengthen bilateral cooperation in climate change action using best available science and data-based modalities.  CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje met MOEJ Vice Minister for Global Environmental Affairs Matsuzawa Yukata with both emphasizing the need to evaluate and assess science-based models currently used and their applications in the Asia-Pacific region.   Borje underscored the importance of bilateral and regional partnership for a comprehensive and integrated assessment of climate change impacts as well as its mitigation and adaptation strategies for nations, individually and collectively. “With Japan, we can consider and assess the utility of models and identify those that can best support individual and joint efforts to develop strategies that enhance climate resilience, protect vulnerable populations, and ensure sustainable development,” Borje stated. One of those identified during the discussions, the Asian-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) developed by the National Institute for Environmental Studies in Kyoto in collaboration with Asian researchers and Mizuho Research & Technologies, streamlines the assessment of climate change measures at the country level. Since its inception in 1990, the AIM has supported national climate policies in Japan, Thailand, Indonesia, and Vietnam. MOEJ expressed its commitment to support the Philippines’ transformative climate change action agenda and to further strengthen bilateral cooperation that aims to produce more effective climate policies tailored to the Philippines' unique vulnerabilities and needs. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
June 03, 2024 Monday
MANILA, 3 June 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) lauded President Ferdinand R. Marcos, Jr.’s signing of Republic Act No. 11995 (RA 11995), also known as the Philippine Ecosystem and Natural Capital Accounting System (PENCAS) Act, citing that the institutionalization of national resource accounting will protect and promote ecological balance and advance climate resilience of the Philippines.   The CCC stated that the PENCAS Act represented a “significant stride towards aligning the country's economic policies with sustainable practices to ensure that climate change mitigation and adaptation are at the center of the country’s national development plans, consistent with the vision of President Marcos of a climate smart and resilient Philippines.” CCC Vice Chair and Executive Director (VCED) Robert Borje pointed out that the PENCAS Act or RA 11995 initiates the adoption and integration of internationally accepted environmental economic accounting frameworks into the country’s resource management. The PENCAS Act, Borje added, mandates the compilation of officially designated statistics on the depletion, degradation, and restoration of natural capital, environmental protection expenditures, pollution, and quality of lands, air, and water, stating also that these data sets will be the basis for national decision-making processes on economic, environmental, and health policy developments.   The law established a mechanism for monitoring and reporting that will contribute to the protection, conservation, and restoration of Philippine ecosystems and environmental resources.   “We thank President Marcos for signing the PENCAS Act. The new law is crucial in realizing the vision of a climate resilient and smart Philippines. PENCAS helps ensure that national policies continue to be driven by best available science and current and more complete data sets,” Borje said. CCC also thanked the Senate and the House of Representatives, including Senator Loren Legarda, for key roles in passing the law.  “The PENCAS Act mandates the inclusion of the country’s natural resources as a vital component of the national economy, supplementing traditional metrics such as gross domestic product (GDP) and human capital,” said Senator Loren Legarda, principal author of the law. “Ngayong ganap nang batas ang PENCAS, inaasahan ko na mapapamahalaan at mapangangalagaan ng maayos ang ating likas na yaman, na naaayon sa datos at impormasyon ng tunay na ambag nito bilang batayan ng ekonomiya, para sa isang makakalikasang pag-unlad ng ating bansa,” she added. The CCC recognized PENCAS’ alignment with global and national climate frameworks such as the Paris Agreement, National Climate Change Action Plan, National Adaptation Plan, Philippine Development Plan, and Nationally Determined Contribution Implementation Plan. “PENCAS is the cornerstone for precise and transparent policy formulation and decision-making in ecological and natural resources management in the country. Furthermore, it provides the solid rationale for directing investments towards programs aimed at fostering healthy, sustainable ecosystem services, and resilient Filipino communities,” said VCED Borje. The law tasks the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) with leading its implementation. Meanwhile, the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources will closely collaborate with the PSA for the provision of the National Capital Accounting (NCA).                    Specific inputs by the CCC during the development of the law include the establishment of natural capital units, valuation of natural capital accounts, involvement of local government units in data collection, implementation of an open data system, and strengthening monitoring, evaluation and reporting mechanisms.                                                                                                             The CCC remains steadfast in its commitment to actively participate in the formulation of pro-climate policies that protect the country’s ecosystems, biodiversity, and natural resources. By supporting PENCAS and similar legislation, the CCC hopes to promote efficient use of resources, reduce environmental risks, and support long-term economic growth that aligns with the country’s climate goals and agenda. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
June 03, 2024 Monday
MANILA, 3 June 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) called for sustainable actions to protect the country’s marine ecosystems and coastal communities to bolster growth and development for fisherfolk as the nation commemorated National Fisherfolk’s Day on 31 May 2024. CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje pointed out the importance of recognizing and ramping up work to address the “challenges faced by our fishing communities due to climate change and other human-induced ecosystem issues. Borje underlined the dependence of fisherfolks on marine and coastal resources and stressed that “human activities contributing to the deterioration of marine ecosystems and climate change must be addressed.” “Our actions significantly impact the health of our environment. Every step we take towards sustainability contributes to the protection and preservation of our marine ecosystems. Let this day demonstrate our common resolve to transformative climate action that protects and promotes our people, including fisherfolk,” he added. Around 8 million Filipinos are directly and indirectly dependent on marine and coastal resources. However, a plethora of issues, including climate change, marine pollution, oil spills, habitat loss, rising sea levels and surface temperatures, and ocean acidification, poses severe threats to their lives and livelihoods. Climate change, in particular, has led to unpredictable weather patterns, more intense tropical cyclones, and altered fish migration routes, further complicating the difficult job of our fisherfolk. Marine pollution, from plastic waste to chemical runoff, degrades the quality of waters, affecting fish health and reducing catches. Oil spills have catastrophic impacts when they occur, destroying entire ecosystems and the communities that depend on them. The loss of vital habitats such as coral reefs and mangroves, which serve as breeding and nursing grounds for many marine species, exacerbates the decline in fish populations. The rise in sea levels threatens coastal communities, increasing the risk of flooding and erosion, while rising surface temperatures and ocean acidification disrupt marine life, leading to a decrease in biodiversity. National Fisherfolk's Day is celebrated annually on May 31 to recognize the dedication of Filipino fisherfolk to protect our coastal and marine resources. The proclamation also recognizes Filipino fisherfolk as the rightful stewards and beneficiaries of our oceans. “Let’s honor the resilience of our fishing communities and commit to sustainable actions to protect our coastal and marine ecosystems, and the lives, livelihood and future of our people,” Borje said. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
June 03, 2024 Monday
CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje urges LGUs and stakeholders to help the government ‘achieve more and better’ in the climate agenda during the Eastern Visayas Summit on Climate-Resilient Development at Tacloban City. TACLOBAN CITY, 27 May 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) highlighted the crucial role of the local government units (LGUs) in the localized implementation of national climate change mitigation and adaptation plans during the recently held Eastern Visayas Summit on Climate-Resilient Development. Secretary Robert E.A. Borje, CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director, emphasized the different national climate change frameworks that were drafted to serve as the nation’s guides in building climate resiliency and smartness. This includes the National Framework Strategy on Climate Change, National Climate Change Action Plan, National Climate Risks Management Framework, the Philippine Development Plan, National Adaptation Plan, and Nationally Determined Contribution Implementation Plan. During his opening speech, Borje underscored the government's commitment to effectively implement national climate frameworks and strategies. He stressed the urgent need for swift action to address the increasing loss and damage caused by climate-induced disasters in the country. “Gone are the times when government agencies simply came up with policies and frameworks for the stakeholders to understand. The responsibility of agencies, such as the Climate Change Commission, is not just to formulate and coordinate policies but also to ensure that policies are fully understood and ultimately implemented,” said Borje. The CCC is tasked to provide technical assistance and support to LGUs in developing their Local Climate Change Action Plans, ensuring high-quality plans that are aligned with international and national climate change frameworks. As of March 2024, LCCAP submission rates are at 87.23%, accounting for 1,496 LGUs around the country. This indicates that more LGUs are ramping up their efforts to integrate climate change into their development plans. Borje also discussed government efforts to assist LGUs in accessing and making full use of international and national climate financing mechanisms such as the People’s Survival Fund (PSF), Green Climate Fund, Loss and Damage Fund, and the Global Shield Against Climate Risk. During the recent PSF Board meeting, six new projects from various LGUs were approved,  bringing the utilization rate of the 1 billion peso fund to 100% and consequently initiating its supposed annual replenishment. Borje urged the LGUs to challenge the commission and the PSF board to maintain 100% utilization annually by submitting cohesive, feasible, and tangible pro-climate initiatives and programs. Recognizing the capacity of LGUs to effectively tailor and execute climate actions, ensuring that national climate objectives are met through practical, on-the-ground efforts, the CCC remains active in working closely with LGUs across the country. By supporting LGUs in local climate policy development, project implementation, community engagement, and collaborations, the Commission aims to bridge the gap between national climate frameworks and local implementation. The Eastern Visayas Summit on Climate-Resilient Development, organized by the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities (ICSC), was held in Tacloban City from May 14-15. The two-day event convened stakeholders from across the region to develop community-focused strategies and actionable plans for fostering inclusive, sustainable, and climate-resilient solutions. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
May 27, 2024 Monday
The Philippine delegation, composed of the Climate Change Commission and other national government agencies, engages in groundwork for the upcoming climate change conference of the United Nations. MANILA, 27 May 2024 — The Philippine Delegation (PhilDel) ramped up its series of interagency meetings to further solidify preparations for the 60th Session of Subsidiary Bodies (SB60) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to be held in Bonn, Germany this June. Drawing from experiences and challenges during previous conferences, the PhilDel to the SB60, composed of representatives from different national agencies, initiated a series of preparatory interagency meetings.These meetings are aimed at discussing ways forward for the upcoming negotiations. During the first meeting, Secretary Robert E.A. Borje, CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director, and Head of Delegation, led the discussions, particularly in developing various approaches to address these possible hurdles. Borje emphasized the importance of communication throughout the entire sessions of SB60. He pointed out that constant internal and external communication will help the delegates to effectively navigate the complexities of the negotiations. “Our participation in SB60 aligns with the guidance of President Ferdinand R. Marcos Jr. to optimize opportunities to articulate and emphasize the Philippines’ position on climate change,” he concluded. As a member of the G77, a coalition of developing nations in the United Nations, the Philippines can receive valuable support, solidarity, and resources to navigate the negotiations within the UNFCCC process and advance its interests in addressing climate change. The first PhilDel preparatory assembly was attended by the CCC, Department of Finance, Department of Foreign Affairs, National Youth Commission, Department of Agriculture, Department of Energy, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, National Economic and Development Authority, Presidential Communication Office, Department of Labor and Employment, and Philippine Information Agency. SB60 is a subsidiary body that helps and negotiates with the conference of the parties to assist the technological, methodological, and scientific matters related to assessing global climate change. The PhilDel continues to prepare for the upcoming SB60. Further interagency meetings are anticipated to equip its members with the necessary knowledge and resources for the conference. The CCC remains dedicated to its commitment to addressing the challenges brought by climate change through active participation in these UNFCCC sessions. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
May 27, 2024 Monday
MANILA, 27 May 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) emphasized the importance of protecting biodiversity and urged for a collective and inclusive action to address issues detrimental to the health of ecosystems and all life forms in the country. The CCC explained the vital functions that ecosystems in the country perform. Biodiversity-rich ecosystems act as natural carbon sinks, absorbing large amounts of heat and carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and oceans, thereby helping to regulate temperature and climate. The Philippines is one of the 18 mega-biodiverse countries in the world. Its ecosystems, ranging from wetlands, tree forests, mangrove forests, and coral reefs, house between 70 and 80 percent of the world’s plant and animal species, making the country a hotspot for biodiversity conservation. Currently, drivers of habitat and biodiversity loss in the country include illegal logging and fishing, mining, pollution, sea and land-use conversion, animal trafficking and poaching, and climate change. Recognizing the value of biodiversity to address climate change and its effects, CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje urged for collective action to protect the country’s biodiverse ecosystems. “Biodiversity is crucial for ecosystem balance and our well-being, and it's increasingly threatened by climate change. We must work together to protect natural habitats, adopt sustainable practices, and support strong environmental policies. By acting now and by being part of the plan, we can ensure a resilient world for future generations,” said Borje. In the Philippines’ draft National Adaptation Plan, ecosystems and biodiversity are identified as one of the eight key sector outcomes, making Philippine biodiversity and ecosystems a priority area for adaptation efforts. The 2023-2028 Philippine Development Plan also emphasizes strategies to improve and protect the country’s biodiversity, primarily through intensified monitoring, protection, management, and rehabilitation. The CCC remains steadfast in its commitment to protect and preserve Philippine biodiversity. Recognizing the ecological services that biodiversity-rich ecosystems provide, the CCC actively seeks further ways to establish mechanisms that effectively aid the protection, conservation, and preservation of our biodiversity and ecosystems. The International Day for Biological Diversity is celebrated annually on May 22 to emphasize the importance of public education and awareness about biological diversity. The UN designated this date during the General Assembly and Convention on Biological Diversity on February 8, 2001. This year, the theme “Be part of the Plan,” encompasses the need for a whole-of-society approach in protecting biodiversity. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
May 27, 2024 Monday
CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje iterates on the importance of having a climate-resilient and climate-smart agriculture sector during the inauguration program of Oriental Mindoro’s Calamansi Processing Center (CPC) and Provincial Agriculture Center (PAC). ORIENTAL MINDORO, 20 May 2024 — The Climate Change Commission echoed President Ferdinand Marcos Jr’s call to boost sustainable and climate-resilient agriculture in the country during the inauguration program of the Calamansi Processing Center (CPC) and Provincial Agriculture Center (PAC) of Oriental Mindoro. The Provincial Government of Oriental Mindoro (PGOM), with support from the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and the CCC, established the CPC and PAC to stimulate and foster growth of sustainable food production and processing industry in the province. The projects are fully funded by the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) and the Korean International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) as part of their Climate Resilient and Inclusive Green Growth Project. In his last official visit to the United States last May 2023, President Ferdinand R. Marcos Jr., committed his utmost effort to boost climate-smart agriculture in the Philippines, institutionalizing a Ministerial-level study group to advance the matter. Months following the visit, President Marcos directed the Department of Agriculture (DA) to urgently modernize agriculture and ensure food security for Filipinos through science-based agri practices. On a more recent note, the President also welcomed Former United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon, President of the Assembly & Chair of the Council of Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) last February where he was able to reinforce GGGI financial and technical interventions towards building climate resiliency in the country. GGGI’s current notable area of work in the country includes boosting climate-smart agriculture and food production which fueled the establishment of the newly opened PAC and CPC of Oriental Mindoro. In support of President Marcos’ initiatives and recognizing the threats that climate change poses to the country’s national food production, agriculture, and livestock, the CCC highlighted the urgency of supporting the development of climate-resilient and sustainable agriculture across the archipelago through research, development, investments, policies, and projects. “Many Filipinos work in the agriculture sector. One in every four Filipinos, or over 10 million people, depend entirely on agriculture to support themselves and their families. Climate change-induced disasters such as extreme droughts and tropical cyclones, threaten their livelihoods. In the first quarter of this year alone, agricultural losses have already doubled our initial farmer support funds of PHP 10 billion. This underscores the critical importance of the agricultural sector,” said CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje in his message of support. Food security amid climate change is included as one of the sectoral outcomes in the draft National Adaptation Plan of the Philippines. It entails mechanisms that ensure the climate-proofing of the Philippine agriculture sector by empowering farmers to use climate information and services and climate-benign technologies to enable sustainable food production.   In response to the President’s call for a climate-smart agriculture sector, the CCC is committed to build the capacity of farming communities and cooperatives to adapt to the devastating effects of climate change.   By forming partnerships with international, local and private organizations, and through the implementation of robust green policies and projects, the CCC aims to further strengthen policy framework and create an enabling environment for a climate-smart and climate-resilient agriculture industry in the Philippines. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
May 20, 2024 Monday
CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje emphasizes the crucial role of the academe, youth and IPs in achieving a climate-resilient and climate-smart Philippines during a forum at the Northern Bukidnon State College. BUKIDNON, 20 May 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) emphasized the crucial role of the academe, youth and the indigenous people communities in fostering climate-resilient and developing climate-active leadership at a forum at the Northern Bukidnon State College. CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje highlighted the urgent need for community-level climate action, underscoring the academe’s indispensable function in catalyzing grassroots efforts across all sectors.   “Education is a powerful tool in the fight against climate change. It equips us with the knowledge and skills to understand complex ecological issues and find innovative solutions. But education alone is not enough. We need action, and that is where you come in,” Borje said during his keynote speech. He noted the importance of evidence-based research in informing public policies, with the academe serving as a crucial source of data and knowledge. Borje also stressed the academe’s role in raising awareness, fostering dialogue, and inspiring action within communities. In the Philippines, climate education is integrated into the education system, with  subjects across various fields incorporating Disaster Risks Reduction Management (DRRM), Climate Change, and Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) concepts. Also, the academe contributes in the field of climate research and development, mobilizing Filipino expertise to understand climate change and guide policy and programmatic responses. The IP communities, on the other hand, play a vital role in managing resources sustainably, conserving ecosystems and biodiversity, and passing down indigenous knowledge from one generation to the next to sustain their communities and the environment. Borje emphasized the principle of Common but Differentiated Responsibilities and Respective Capabilities, recognizing that individuals have distinct roles based on their resources and capabilities in addressing climate change. “Sometimes, the challenges we face seem overwhelming, and it's easy to feel powerless. But remember, every climate action counts. Small changes, when multiplied across millions of people, can make a big difference,” Borje encouraged. The CCC, as the head policymaking body of the Philippines on climate change, is tasked to mainstream climate change within the Filipino populace. The Commission reiterated its commitment to educating all Filipino people about climate science, its dangers and potential solutions. By harnessing the academe’s capacity to educate, advocate, and research climate-related issues, the CCC aims to foster climate-smart and climate-conscious individuals, industries, and communities across the country. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
May 20, 2024 Monday
CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje iterates the vital roles of the civil society in pushing climate action in the country during the 7th Consultation Meeting with Civil Society Organizations of WE CAN mechanism. QUEZON CITY, 20 May 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) emphasized the crucial role of civil society organizations (CSOs) in advancing and supporting the government’s agenda to efficiently address the adverse impacts of climate change during the Working to Empower Climate Action Network’s (WE CAN) 7th Consultation Meeting with Civil Society Organizations. Recognizing the need to formalize and institutionalize robust coordination and engagement with CSOs, the CCC embarked on establishing WE CAN in 2022. The mechanism, at full capacity, will pave the way for the Commission and the CSOs to have a multilateral working partnership with the shared benefits of knowledge and network resource exchange, strengthening further their relationship. As part of its regular preparatory process, the CCC conducted WE CAN’s 7th Consultation Meeting with the main agenda of strengthening the mechanism’s Terms of Reference. CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje highlighted the government’s continued commitment to invoking a whole-of-society and whole-of-government approach in addressing climate change, citing WE CAN as the pathway for government-to-civil society engagement. “WE CAN will institutionalize the ways of our engagement, providing a sustainable platform for both civil society and the CCC to work together towards downstream and upstream climate action,” said Borje during his keynote speech. Meanwhile, CCC Commissioner Rachel Anne S. Herrera stressed the vitality of WE CAN in ensuring a balanced and sustained engagement with the civil society in pursuing climate resiliency and smartness in the country. “WE CAN is a detailed mechanism that guides us on how we can work together on various programs and efforts on climate action. It is a platform that will make our partnerships more inclusive, participatory, relevant, and more meaningful,” Herrera commented. “The intention is to move away from a top-down approach and instead establish a coordination mechanism that is co-owned by the civil society in order to enable a more in-depth discussion of various climate-related matters,” she added. The CCC remains steadfast in its pursuit of inclusive climate goals, ensuring that all sectors, including the civil society, are engaged in the process of building a climate-resilient and climate-smart Philippines. By leveraging the grassroots connections, advocacy capabilities, and localized knowledge of CSOs, the CCC hopes to involve a majority of the local communities in the achievement of the country’s climate agenda. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
May 20, 2024 Monday
MANDAUE CITY, CEBU, 20 May 2024 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) emphasized the critical role of women in addressing climate change and advocating for gender equality in ecological governance at the recent Advancing Women’s and Girls’ Climate Action through Rule of Law Multi-stakeholder Conference. CCC Commissioner Rachel Anne S. Herrera underscored the importance of empowering women as leaders in climate action and ensuring their full participation in decision-making processes. "As representatives of government, institutions, and sectors, we must ensure that women climate advocates are not only represented but empowered to lead the charge in climate action," she emphasized. "Climate justice and the rights of women and girls are intertwined, and it is imperative that we address the gender disparities exacerbated by climate change." Acknowledging the disproportionate impact of climate disasters on women, Herrera stressed the need to amplify women's voices in climate discourse. She emphasized the importance of communication in spreading awareness about the intersectionality of gender and climate issues, advocating for policies that eliminate barriers to women's access to resources and representation. "The CCC recognizes that women are agents of change, capable of managing resources and driving community resilience," Herrera stated. "Empowering women and strengthening legal frameworks that address their needs are vital steps towards achieving climate justice and gender equality." By engaging with various stakeholders, including women and girls, the CCC endeavors to create a more inclusive and effective approach to tackling environmental challenges. “We recognize the key role of women in transformative climate action, and as object and instrument of policy, the CCC is committed to promote gender mainstreaming in all aspects of our work,” said CCC Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje. The CCC has partnered with the International Development Law Organization (IDLO) to host the three-day conference in Mandaue City from May 7 to May 9. Co-organized by the Philippine Commission on Women, Philippine Earth Justice Center, and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), the event underscores the urgency of collective action in addressing the intertwined challenges of gender inequality and climate change. Supreme Court Associate Justice Maria Filomena D. Singh delivered the keynote address on the opening day, emphasizing the indispensable contribution of women and girls to the preservation of our planet. "Future generations cannot exist without women and girls. Thus, protecting and empowering them in relation to environmental responsibilities is essential," she said. Dr. Macario T. Jusayan, Chief Gender and Development Specialist of the Philippine Commission on Women, emphasized the importance of knowledge sharing and capacity building to remove barriers hindering women and girls from exercising their rights and actively engaging in climate resilience initiatives. “This event will also showcase successful legal and regulatory frameworks from across the country and identify actionable steps for collective action to advance gender-responsive climate justice,” he said. Director Elenida Basug of Climate Change Service and National GAD Focal Point System of DENR, stressed the crucial role of the rule of law in promoting feminist climate justice. “By prioritizing women and girls in climate action, we not only strengthen our legal and judicial frameworks but also foster resilient institutions and champion the rights of women amid environmental transformations. Empowering women and girls to actively participate in decision-making processes is not merely a goal but a fundamental necessity for sustainable and inclusive development." The multi-stakeholder conference, attended by government agencies, civil society, and academia, signifies a collaborative effort to mainstream gender-responsive climate action and legal frameworks. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
May 20, 2024 Monday
Dhaka, Bangladesh. Recognizing that finance and investments are crucial for implementing transformative climate actions, the Philippines called for the immediate delivery of climate finance commitments and underscored the need to close adaptation finance gaps, including through exploring innovative sources, to support developing nations’ adaptation measures. The importance of National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) for developing nations most at-risk to and affected by climate change was emphasized at the NAP Expo 2024. A high-level transformational dialogue was held to unlock diverse sources of adaptation finance. Climate Change Commission (CCC) Secretary Robert E.A. Borje joined the dialogue, together with United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Executive Secretary Simon Stiell, and Bangladesh Minister for Environment, Forestry and Climate Change Saber Hossain Chowdhury. Borje underscored the importance of holistic approach to close adaptation finance gaps, ensuring that support for developing countries’ NAP formulation and implementation is available and easily accessible. “To close the gaps, address our growing needs, and enhance adaptation action and support, we must work collectively to determine and unlock various sources, including the UNFCCC financial mechanism, and finance options with highest concessionality, least to no conditionalities, and no additional debt burden for developing nations,” Borje said. The UN Environment Programme’s Adaptation Gap Report 2023 estimated that support for adaptation falls short by up to USD 366 billion per year. Public finance flows for climate change adaptation from developed to developing countries have declined by 15 percent from 2021 figures, signaling the need to explore other sources for timely implementation of adaptation measures. “We need to go beyond the doubling of adaptation finance by 2025, and delivering on the overdue commitment of USD 100 billion for developing countries’ climate actions,” Borje emphasized. “We need to be more creative and innovative to enable our timely implementation of action plans – so that we avoid further loss and damage, while building our adaptive capacities.”  Guided by President Ferdinand R. Marcos, Jr., the Philippines forges partnerships with various countries, partners and stakeholders to augment domestic resources, enabling implementation of climate actions in speed and scale. In addition to the UNFCCC financial mechanism including the Green Climate Fund (GCF), Borje highlighted other innovative sources of support applicable to the Philippines, such as bilateral partnerships, private sector investments, foreign-assisted support from development partners and stakeholders, and mechanisms such as thematic bonds. From formulation to implementation, Borje underscored the importance of climate finance throughout the iterative process of NAPs. “NAPs should then be considered as investment plans. With sufficient finance and transparent and predictable support flows, developing nations can translate plans into concrete actions with results,” Borje added. Discussions on closing adaptation finance gaps and determining the new collective quantified goal on climate finance are expected to progress at  the 29th Session of the Conference of Parties (COP29). Hosted by the UNFCCC through the Least Developed Countries (LDC) Expert Group or LEG, in collaboration with the Adaptation Committee (AC) and other constituted bodies, the NAP Expo 2024 was held from 22-25 April 2024 in Dhaka, Bangladesh.  Outcomes of the NAP Expo 2024 will be further discussed in the upcoming Climate Change Conference in June 2024 in Bonn, Germany, and COP29 in November 2024 in Baku, Azerbaijan.
May 10, 2024 Friday
Dhaka, Bangladesh. The Philippines emphasized the importance of developing and implementing National Adaptation Plans (NAPs), and accelerating the provision and mobilization of support for developing nations to enable countries to outline their roadmaps towards climate resilience.  The ninth NAP Expo, hosted by the UN Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), in Dhaka, Bangladesh, centered on the theme "Driving Transformational Adaptation through National Adaptation Plans." Bangladesh Prime Minister, H.E. Sheikh Hasina, urged nations to prioritize their policies and programs enhancing their adaptive capacities. Hasina also inaugurated the “Bangladesh Climate Development Partnership” to bolster cooperation with international partners in advancing their climate agenda. CCC Secretary Robert E.A. Borje, serving as member of the UNFCCC’s Adaptation Committee attended the opening ceremony, joining UNFCCC Executive Secretary Simon Stiell and Adaptation Director Youseff Nasseff.  He echoed Hasina's sentiments, stressing NAPs' significance for developing countries. Borje emphasized that NAPs, based on local risks and priorities, serve as crucial roadmaps to resilience, safeguarding lives and livelihoods amidst worsening climate change. “Country-driven, science- and evidence-based NAPs will assist developing countries in addressing climate change and its impacts. With the assessment of local risks and vulnerabilities, and priority climate actions, NAP serves as our roadmap to resilience – a plan that can save our lives and livelihoods, and protect our future amidst worsening climate change,” Borje said. The Philippines shared its NAP formulation journey during various sessions, discussing best practices, lessons learned, and challenges. Borje underscored the need to view NAPs as investment plans during high-level dialogues, advocating for support to facilitate NAP formulation for developing nations. Hosted by the UNFCCC through the Least Developed Countries (LDC) Expert Group or LEG, in collaboration with the Adaptation Committee (AC) and other constituted bodies, the NAP Expo 2024 was held from 22-25 April 2024 in Dhaka, Bangladesh.  Appointed during the 28th Sessions of the Conference of Parties (COP28), Borje serves as a member of the AC representing developing nations. It is the first time a Filipino national was appointed in the 14-year history of the AC, developing policies and providing guidance on global adaptation actions. Outcomes of the NAP Expo 2024 will be deliberated at the Bonn Climate Change Conference in June 2024 and reported at the Conference of Parties in November 2024, signaling ongoing international collaboration towards climate resilience.
May 09, 2024 Thursday
CCC and Bhutan’s RSPN discuss pro-climate practices and explore potential opportunities for future collaboration during a lunch meeting. MANILA, 9 May 2024 — Sharing insights and experiences, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) and Bhutan’s Royal Society for Protection of Nature (RSPN) engaged in a discussion, exchanging best practices, victories, and challenges in addressing the impacts of climate change and examining potential areas of collaboration. During a meeting with RSPN, the CCC delegation, led by Deputy Executive Director Rommel Antonio O. Cuenca, delved into several key aspects of the nation’s climate change strategy. These include mainstreaming frameworks such as the National Framework Strategy on Climate Change, the National Climate Change Action Plan, and the development of the National Adaptation Plan. He outlined the Philippine government’s process for accessing the Green Climate Fund, establishing the People’s Survival Fund, and building collaborative relationships with all stakeholders across all sectors. Furthermore, Cuenca conveyed the country’s ongoing challenges in promoting climate resilience, emphasizing the difficulties in laymanizing and communicating climate change to the general public and improving compliance with Local Climate Change Action Plans, particularly in remote areas of the Philippine archipelago. “Climate change affects the lives, livelihoods, and future of many Filipinos. Despite contributing only a small percent to the global emissions, the Philippines suffers much devastation from climate change effects. Hence, there is a need for us to take comprehensive action to address climate change, with a focus on adaptation,” stressed Cuenca. Meanwhile, Mr. Dasho Phub Dorji, Chairperson of the Board of Directors of the RSPN, shared practical insights and experiences in pushing for climate mitigation and adaptation, sustainable development, and ecological education in Bhutan.   The Kingdom of Bhutan is currently the only country in the world that is carbon negative — a distinction reserved for countries capable of removing more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere than they emit. “Despite this achievement, we still face many challenges, especially in managing climate-induced disasters like flooding and in stopping illegal human activities that exacerbate climate change such as deforestation,” Dorji said. RSPN, a non-government organization, aims to raise awareness of climate change among Bhutanese people through education, advocacy and public participation in conservation efforts. Through the continued dedication, both the CCC and RSPN seek to innovate strategies to mitigate climate change impacts through knowledge and practices sharing. “Growing partnerships through cooperation continues to be needed to allow developing nations to learn and adapt to climate change and its impacts. We need to continue working together to ensure that we are empowered to adapt to and mitigate climate change impacts and safeguard the precious balance in our planet, ” said Vice Chairperson and Executive Director Robert E.A. Borje. The CCC remains resolute in its commitment to achieving Sustainable Development Goal 13 - Climate Action and SDG 17 -  Partnerships for Sustainable Development. The Commission continues to forge effective partnerships to advance the country’s progress toward achieving its climate goals and agendas. For more information on the CCC’s climate mainstreaming activities, visit www.climate.gov.ph and www.facebook.com/CCCPhl.
May 09, 2024 Thursday