Get ready, be updated. Bringing you the latest news about the Climate Change Commission.
 


 

MANILA, 19 September 2020 — In celebration of the National Clean-Up Month, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) encouraged households and individuals to take time to declutter, implement proper waste management practices, reassess past purchases, and join online efforts towards the preservation and conservation of the environment. By virtue of Proclamation No. 244, the month of September is declared as the National Clean-Up Month, while Presidential Proclamation No. 470 also designates the 3rd Saturday of September as National Clean-Up Day. Both observances seek to encourage citizens and communities to be responsive in cleaning and protecting the environment. The CCC stressed that there should be increased awareness on waste due to the production and consumption of personal protective equipment (PPE), face masks, gloves, and other COVID-related supplies, which may end up as litter in waterways and our oceans. In this regard, the CCC calls on national and local authorities and citizens in implementing the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000, which requires  practices on effective waste management—such as segregation of garbage at source, segregated transportation, processing, treatment, and proper disposal of solid waste—beginning from the home and extending to all levels of society. The CCC enjoins the public to do individual or small cleanups in the home and within the neighborhood, while complying with health and safety measures in this community quarantine due to COVID-19. May this year’s celebration also inspire the youth, national and local leaders, policymakers, businesses, and other stakeholders to do their fair share in keeping a healthy, resilient, and sustainable planet for all.
September 18, 2020 Friday
MANILA, 19 September 2020 – Starting this Monday, September 21, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) and the Oscar M. Lopez Center (OMLC) will commence with the conduct of Climate Film Labs (CFL), a series of trainings on climate science and filmmaking for the participating youth teams of the Klima Film Festival (KFF). The CFL aims to deepen their knowledge and skills to produce science-based films on climate change, as well as their understanding about the climate realities within their regions. It will be conducted online, once a week for four weeks. Teams who qualified for the CFL were clustered based on their regions. A total of five labs will be created and composed of four to seven teams each. For each lab, a science mentor and a film mentor will be assigned, taking into account their expertise on the fields to be discussed and knowledge on the regional language and culture. The labs and regional assignments are as follows: Lab 1: Regions I and II and Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR) Lab 2: Regions III, IV-A, and IV-B Lab 3: National Capital Region (NCR) Lab 4: Region VIII Lab 5: Regions IX and X and the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao The invited science mentors include Dr. Marilou Lucas, Professor at the Mariano Marcos State University; Dr. Pedcris Orencio, Program Head of the Research & Development of Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA); Dr. Faye Abigail Cruz, Laboratory Head of the Ateneo de Manila University; Dr. Enrique Oracion, Research Director at Silliman University; and Dr. Mark Anthony Torres, Professor at the Mindanao State University-Iligan Institute of Technology. The invited film mentors include Mr. Zig Madamba Dulay, screenwriter and director; Mr. Eduardo Roy Jr., director, writer, and founder of Found Films; Mr. Jose Lorenzo Diokno, director from Global Shapers Manila; Ms. Mary Honeylyn Joy Alipio, screenwriter and lecturer at the University of the Philippines Film Institute; Mr. Lawrence Fajardo, editor and director from Pelikulaw Production; and Mr. Antonio Hesumaria Sescon, director and sculptor from Urian Arts Center. Through the CFL, the CCC and OMLC seek to provide youth participants a venue for consultation with science and film experts towards producing quality films on climate action. For more information about the Klima Film Festival and Climate Film Labs, visit the Facebook page of the Climate Change Commission at facebook.com/CCCPhl, its website at climate.gov.ph/events/klima-film-festival, or message the KFF Secretariat at [email protected].
September 18, 2020 Friday
 
September 17, 2020 Thursday
MANILA, 18 September 2020 — In celebration of World Bamboo Day today, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) highlighted the role of bamboos in climate change adaptation and mitigation and called for support in unlocking the Philippine bamboo industry’s potential to provide sustainable livelihoods and promote climate resilience in our communities. World Bamboo Day, initiated during the 8th World Bamboo Congress on September 18, 2009, at Prachan Buri, Thailand, aims to highlight the importance of bamboo towards ensuring sustainable utilization and cultivation of bamboo for new industries in regions around the world, as well as the promotion of its traditional uses and economic benefits for our communities. The CCC expressed that bamboo propagation is a nature-based solution that can help in poverty alleviation, environmental protection, and climate change mitigation. Bamboo gives off 35% more oxygen than trees and sequesters more carbon (400%) per unit area. It also produces a huge amount of biomass, absorbs heavy metals, conserves water, restores degraded lands, and stabilizes soils against erosion. According to the International Network for Bamboo and Rattan, the local and global bamboo industry is aligned with 11 of 17 the UN Sustainable Development Goals, including affordable and clean energy, decent work and economic growth, sustainable cities and communities, and climate action. The CCC noted that this grass plant is flexible, strong, versatile, and fast-growing and can be harvested after only three to five years, compared to thick wood, which can only be harvested usually after 20 years. The Philippines, as one of the world’s top exporters of bamboo, has about 60 known species of bamboo. However, the number of hectares designated as bamboo forest is not enough. For World Bamboo Day, the CCC urges further research, investments, and support to grow and maximize our Philippine bamboo industry. Propagating bamboos can further create green jobs and resilient enterprises, as well as provide sustainable livelihoods to millions of people in rural areas. Investing on bamboo will transform our people's lives at the grassroots and will pave the way for a cleaner, healthier, and more sustainable future for our country.
September 17, 2020 Thursday
Have separate bins for used masks, gloves, and personal protective equipment (PPE) to avoid possible contamination. It is also important to start using sustainable packages for food and other necessities. Photos from unisanuk.com and pexels.com. MANILA, 17 September 2020 — Amid the existing concerns on health and safety during this COVID-19 pandemic, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) also warned the public on the surge of plastic pollution due to the global production and consumption of single-use masks, latex gloves, personal protective equipment (PPE), alcohol and hand sanitizer bottles, and disposable cleaning agents. The CCC stated that plastic waste may end up in our oceans, break into microplastics, and be mistaken for food by marine animals, such as fish, which humans also consume. The climate body also expressed concern on the increasing volume of single-use plastic wastes from take-out and online shopping deliveries. As COVID-19 restricted public mobility, online shopping and food delivery services, often using single-use plastics, have further encumbered our waste management system. With this, the CCC called on local governments and citizens to help in addressing plastic pollution generated during this global health crisis. The CCC also supported the implementation of Administrative Order No. 22-2013 issued by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) on the proper management and disposal of used masks, PPEs, and other considered hazardous (infectious) waste from hospitals, barangay health centers, and clinics. The climate body also stressed the importance of the enactment of the Ecological Solid Waste Management (ESWM) Act of 2000, which provides guidance on proper  segregation at source, transportation, storage, transfer, processing, treatment, and disposal of solid waste and other waste management activities that do not harm the environment. The CCC also encouraged households and individuals to refuse disposable plastic cutlery when having food delivered and support businesses offering more sustainable delivery packaging, such as cardboard or compostable bags. The CCC expressed that the biggest challenge in adopting a more sustainable lifestyle is breaking old habits and making sacrifices for the climate and environment. But by slowly incorporating sustainable practices into our everyday activities, we would be able to protect both the health of the people, natural systems, and the planet.
September 16, 2020 Wednesday
MANILA, 16 September 2020 — In observance of the 35th International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) urged better measures that would prevent the depletion of the Earth’s ozone layer and encouraged everyone to work together to preserving the life on our planet. Celebrated on September 16th of every year, the international observance commemorates the signing of the 1987 Montreal Protocol on ‘Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer’ (Resolution 49/114), which aims to spread awareness on the depletion of the ozone layer and solutions to preserve it, by reducing the production of substances that are supposed to be responsible for the ozone layer depletion. The CCC noted that the ‘ozone layer’ is the common term for the high concentration of ozone that is found in the stratosphere above the Earth’s surface which covers and protects the entire planet by absorbing harmful Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation from the sun. It was discovered in the 1970’s that humanity was creating a hole in the ozone layer–caused by ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) used in aerosols and cooling, such as refrigerators and air-conditioners–which increases cases of skin cancer and cataracts, as well as damage plants, crops, and ecosystems. Since then, swift global action from among governments and industries has resulted in measures to control total global production and consumption of ozone-depleting substances, in consideration of recent developments in scientific knowledge and technological solutions. With this year’s theme “Ozone for life: 35 years of ozone layer protection,” the observance reminds everyone of the crucial role of the ozone in sustaining all forms of life on Earth and of everyone’s responsibility to maintain and preserve its current state for the present and future generations. As the COVID-19 pandemic and the climate crisis have brought social and economic setbacks for many countries around the world, the CCC expressed that the message of working together in harmony and for the collective good is as crucial now more than ever.
September 15, 2020 Tuesday
MANILA, 16 September 2020 — All those newly reacquainted with nature due to the pandemic, plantitos and plantitas, and newbie birdwatchers are invited to join the 18th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways.” The episode will be looking at the larger island ecosystems where our new friends come from, under the topic “Panay: Native Plants, Birds, and Island Ecology.” The episode, hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 17 September 2020, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/CongLorenLegarda and facebook.com/CCCPhl/.   Panay island and its biodiversity and ecology will be featured as a shining example, where experts and advocates will join the online conversation, including Mr. Flord Nicson Calawag of the Panay Bird Club; Mr. Ralph Perez of Lunhaw Madia-as, a group of native tree enthusiasts in Panay and Guimaras; Ms. Lisa Paguntalan, Executive Director of the Philippines Biodiversity Conservation Foundation; and Dr. Enrique Sanchez, Jr., President of the Philippine Initiative for Conservation of  Environment and the People. The episode will feature priority conservation measures in the natural forest of Panay Island, the most important carbon sink in the region and its high level of biological diversity and endemism. The episode aims to promote the scaling up of efforts in Panay to all islands in the country. Episode eighteen of the “Stories for a Better Normal” series is an opportunity to encourage more Filipinos to take initial steps toward raising awareness on the importance of ecosystem conservation, understand the values and benefits of biodiversity, and encourage other islands to replicate its good practices on sustainable tourism. In previous episodes, the online series tackled food gardening, saving seeds, permaculture, good nutrition and diet, youth climate activism, sustainable urban mobility, planting native trees, practical sustainability, books, and plant health in order to teach citizens to be self-sustainable and self-sufficient.  As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.    This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation.
September 15, 2020 Tuesday
MANILA, 15 September 2020 — In celebration of the National Teacher’s Month, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) pays homage to Filipino teachers and educators and their hard work, sacrifices, and efforts in shaping the future of education and honing the minds of our children, despite the challenges of online learning in this COVID-19 pandemic.   Celebrated from September 5 to October 5 of every year by virtue of Proclamation No. 242, s. 2011, the National Teachers’ Month recognizes the unique role and service that teachers play in guiding families, strengthening communities, and building the nation. Republic Act No. 10743 and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) also declared October 5 as the National Teachers’ Day and World Teachers’ Day, respectively.   The theme for this year’s National Teachers’ Month is “iTeach for a Better Future: Gurong Filipino para sa Batang Filipino,” which aims to mark the dedication of teachers all over the country to deliver timely and quality education in ensuring that no child is left behind as we transition towards online and distance learning.   As second parents to our children, our teachers play a big role in educating our children on the importance of climate and environmental stewardship. They inculcate the values to our youth in taking care of our climate and environment through planting trees, conserving water and energy, recycling, and many others.   For this National Teachers’ Month and Teachers’ Day celebrations, the CCC is one with our teachers and the Department of Education in raising a generation of Filipinos who are well-equipped to advocate, innovate, and take action in addressing the challenges of our time. We call on everyone’s support for our teachers and educators in recognition of their invaluable role to nation-building in this time of pandemic and climate emergency.  
September 14, 2020 Monday
 
September 13, 2020 Sunday
MANILA, 11 September 2020 — Plant and tree experts shared tips and advice to support plant and tree health, such as managing common plant pests and diseases using natural methods and managing tree hazards through arboricultural interventions, during the 17th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” with the topic “The Plant Doctors are In!” The online conversation hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda featured plant doctors Ms. Lysette Lacambra, Technical Specialist of the East-West Seed Knowledge Transfer; Dr. Aimee Lynn Dupo, Entomologist and Professor from the Institute of Biological Sciences (IBS), University of the Philippines Los Baños (CAS-UPLB); and Dr. Armando Palijon, Forester and former Professor of the Institute of Renewable and Natural Resources (IRNR), College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños (CFNR-UPLB). Ms. Lacambra discussed the challenges in managing common insect pests and diseases found in the garden, as well as urged home-based plant growers or “plantitos and plantitas” to practice Integrated Pest Management (IPM) by using natural pest control mechanisms. “A symptom is caused by many potential suspects, so you need to investigate and diagnose the problem to arrive at the right solution. You should always consider IPM (Integrated Pest Management) for your solutions. But do remember that IPM is not one size fits all, so what works in the Philippine setting may not be applicable in other countries,” said Lacambra. Dr. Dupo discussed the  connection between an entomologist and plant pathologist, as well as gave pointers to manage different kinds of insect pests in the garden. “Sa ating mga garden, hindi natin tinatanggal 100% ang mga insekto. Natural na magkaroon ng insekto kasi naglagay tayo ng mga bagay na pwede nilang kainin. So, hindi natin sila mapipigilan na hindi dumalaw sa ating garden. Ang pwede lang po natin gawin ay i-manage ‘yung numbers nila,” said Dr. Dupo. Dr. Palijon explained the symptoms of defective trees, as well as discussed managing tree risks or hazards through arboricultural interventions, such as correcting and treatment of pruning wounds, treating tree cavities, and cabling and bracing. He also stressed the importance of tree architecture and the benefits we could get from healthy trees. “I would like to emphasize that healthy trees that are free from defects are assets to the landscape because of their ecological, social, economic, aesthetic, and amenity benefits. We know for a fact that trees store a lot of carbon which help us in mitigating global and local warming,” said Dr. Palijon. Legarda shared that during the COVID-19 pandemic, many people discovered the joy and the value of growing plants and vegetables in their own homes. As a certified “plantita”, she also showed some of the native trees and plants she planted in her own farm and garden.  She expressed that she would add a provision in her “Better Normal Bill” to highlight the importance of ensuring healthy, well-maintained trees as vital component of public infrastructure. “In the better normal, we not only take care of the health of human beings, but also the health of our plant and tree species that provide us the oxygen that we breathe, the food we eat, and the resources to live. The more we learn and define what a better normal should be, the more we are encouraged and committed to pursue a healthier and more sustainable life for all,” Legarda said. As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, Stories for a Better Normal aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.      This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, and the Mother Earth Foundation. 
September 10, 2020 Thursday
Delagates from Bhutan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of Marshall Islands (RMI), Thailand, and Vietnam gathered to identify ways to develop and implement gender-responsive climate action within the energy and agricultural sectors during the Asia-Pacific Regional Workshop on Mainstreaming Gender Equality into Agriculture and Energy held last November 22-23, 2019 as part of the celebration of the 12th Annual Global Warming and Climate Change Consciousness Week. MANILA, 10 September 2020 — The Climate Change Commission reiterates the need for the incorporation of a gender lens in the formulation and implementation of policies on climate and security, specifically in communities affected by climate change and conflict, to reduce the risks on one of the most vulnerable sectors to climate change and violence, and to support the building of resilient, inclusive, and peaceful societies. Citing the  collaborative report of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women); Department of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs (DPPA); and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) entitled “Gender, Climate and Security: Sustaining inclusive peace on the frontlines of climate change” which was released in June 2020, the CCC echoed that there is an intricate connection between gender equality, state fragility, and climate vulnerability of countries around the world, showing that women on the frontlines of climate action are playing a vital role in conflict prevention, and sustainable and inclusive peace. Further, the report states that communities affected by conflict and climate change face a double crisis and the ongoing pandemic has only compounded the impacts of climate change on food security, livelihoods, social cohesion, and security. Such added challenges can undermine decades of development gains, escalating violence, and also disrupt the fragile peace processes. Climate change has fueled heatwaves, fiercer storms, rising seas, prolonged droughts, and floods that have impacted the livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people across the world. These risks exacerbate gender inequalities. Women often bear the brunt of these effects. The report also emphasized that “women are facing disproportionate economic burdens due to different types of marginalization; gendered expectations can lead men and women to resort to violence when traditional livelihoods fail; and important socio-economic shifts can result from changes to patterns of migration.” Economically, women are at a disadvantage because they disproportionately make up the world’s poor. Women are also less likely to be educated and represented in government or leadership positions. Women face greater health and safety risks when water and sanitation systems become compromised, and they take on increased domestic work when resources dwindle. In times of conflict, women are often subject to sexual violence and other abuses. Establishing a direct correlation between environmental degradation and gender inequality has not always been straightforward. But recent data-driven studies have confirmed what many experts have known for years: Women are more vulnerable to the political, social, and economic effects of climate change. The same report stressed the urgent need for gender-responsive action to tackle these linked crises, and pointed out that “interventions around natural resources, the environment, and climate change, for example, provide significant opportunities for women’s political and economic leadership and strengthen their contributions to peace.” Similarly, “sustainable natural resource programming also offers opportunities to mitigate sexual and gender-based violence in conflict. Recognizing that peace and security, human rights and development are interdependent is vital to forge a better future.” The report also called for more investment for gender equality. Women’s empowerment is required in fragile states and especially in sectors related to natural resources where it is particularly low. The report stressed the need to “ensure that gender considerations are appropriately reflected in debates and deliberations on emerging policy on climate-related security risks – not only to strengthen awareness and understanding of particular vulnerabilities, but also to highlight opportunities for leadership and inclusion of women and marginalized groups in decision-making processes." The CCC echoes the report’s recommendations for integrated action. Currently, the agency implements policies and actions which address the impacts of climate change on women, this to include the National Climate Change Action Plan (NCCAP) where one of its main components is “the identification of differential impacts of climate change on men, women, and children,” and the Climate Change Act of 2009 which notes the importance of gender mainstreaming in climate action. The act also recognizes the vital aspects of women’s voices in climate policy and action formulation. In coordination with the Philippine Commission on Women (PCW), the agency is currently working on its Level 3: Gender and Development (GAD) Application from its previous status of Level 1: Foundation Formation, following the PCW’s initial assessment of the CCC’s Gender Mainstreaming Evaluation Framework (GMEF). The GMEF is a tool that identifies the status and/or progress of government agencies in mainstreaming gender and development in their respective organizations, particularly in their systems, structures, policies, programs, processes, and procedures, in line with the implementation of the Magna Carta of Women and other GAD mandates, such as the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), Beijing Platform for Action (BPfA), and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As a country member of the UNFCCC, the CCC recognizes the convention’s endeavors towards gender and climate change action and continues to support these endeavors by coming up with ways to improve the existing Gender Action Plans. Meanwhile, the climate body also calls on lawmakers and local government heads to study and address the connections between gender, climate and security to effectively respond to the range of crises that the planet faces, such as the increased competition and conflict over scarce resources as climate change triggers more extreme weather patterns around the world. By bringing women into these actions as agents of change and not as victims, our country can build back better with great consideration of gender risks by ensuring post-COVID-19 economies will begin to address the fundamental inequalities and disproportionate impacts of climate change on women, and the interconnected nature of gender inequality on the whole of society.
September 09, 2020 Wednesday
MANILA, 9 September 2020 — For the 17th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic “The Plant Doctors Are In!” plant pathologists, entomologists, and foresters will discuss the importance of plant health in promoting biodiversity, sustainable food production, and healthier ecosystems.   This episode is in celebration of the International Year of Plant Health declared by the United Nations. Hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, it will air on Thursday, 10 September 2020, 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/conglorenlegarda and facebook.com/CCCPhl/.   Plant experts who will join the online conversation include Ms. Lysette Lacambra, Technical Specialist of the East-West Seed Knowledge Transfer; Dr. Aimee Lynn Dupo, Entomologist and Professor from the Institute of Biological Sciences (IBS), College of Arts and Sciences, University of the Philippines Los Baños (CAS-UPLB); and Dr. Armando Palijon, Forester and former Professor of the Institute of Renewable and Natural Resources (IRNR), College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños (CFNR-UPLB).   This upcoming episode will provide practical tips on managing common plant pests and diseases using natural methods and share knowledge on maintaining healthy plants by attracting beneficial insects in the gardens. It also seeks to encourage more Filipinos to appreciate the value of growing plants and vegetables at home for food availability and security. Previous episodes showed lively discussions on food gardening, saving seeds, permaculture, good nutrition and diet, youth climate activism, sustainable urban mobility, planting native trees, practical sustainability, and risk-to-resilience stories in order to teach citizens to be self-sustainable and self-sufficient.   As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines and Mother Earth Foundation. 
September 08, 2020 Tuesday
MANILA, 8 September 2020 — In celebration of International Literacy Day today, the Climate Change Commission (CCC) underscored the role of climate educators in enhancing the country’s climate science literacy to effectively communicate climate change impacts and adaptation pathways to vulnerable communities in the country. International Literacy Day is celebrated on September 8 every year to raise awareness and concern for literacy problems that exist within our local communities as well as globally. International Literacy Day was founded by proclamation of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, or UNESCO, in 1966 “to remind the public of the importance of literacy as a matter of dignity and human rights.” With the theme “Literacy teaching and learning in the COVID-19 crisis and beyond,” this year’s celebration aims to highlight the role of educators in a changing world and to recognize the need to enhance their skills, working conditions, and teaching methodologies in facing the challenges brought by the COVID-19 pandemic in the educational systems. As the challenges brought by the COVID-19 pandemic and the climate crisis continue to confront communities, the contribution of climate educators in helping achieve sustainable development and climate resilience for the country and the planet have become even more valuable. The climate body emphasized the role of climate educators in knowledge sharing and interpretation of climate data to the general public, especially to local leaders and decision-makers. The American Association for the advancement of Science highlighted that people who are climate science-literate know that climate science can inform our decisions that improve quality of life. They have a basic understanding of the climate system, including the natural and human-caused factors that affect it. Climate science-literate individuals understand how climate observations and records as well as computer modeling contribute to scientific knowledge about climate. They are aware of the fundamental relationship between climate and human life and the many ways in which climate has always played a role in human health. They can assess the validity of scientific arguments about climate and use that information to support their decisions. In terms of adaptation, the CCC highlighted that climate educators and researchers can motivate people to participate and be part of all the decision-making processes in their locality. They can link policymakers, scientists, local farmers, fisherfolk, and other sectors to come up with effective adaptation interventions and plans that can serve as a guide to a resilient and adaptive community. Climate educators can also help develop and implement programs on raising community awareness with the support of local government to highlight the possible impacts of climate change on local food production, water resources, biodiversity, natural assets, built infrastructure, and human health, and recommend adaptation interventions that can be replicated in other places. As part of its initiative to deliver capacity building initiatives to local government units (LGUs) and higher education institutions (HEIs) even in this time of the pandemic, the CCC will tap alternative means of implementing its flagship capacity building program, the Communities for Resilience (CORE), to meet the growing demands of LGUs and HEIs for capacity building. It will cover all modules and topics originally in the CORE program. The initiative of the CORE e-Learning Platform is to strengthen and mainstream the capacity of LGUs nationwide to do risk-based planning and programming. For the CCC, addressing climate change arises from an intergenerational responsibility to protect natural resources. Only by engaging climate educators, scientists, and LGUs, who are constantly finding new ways to find science-based solutions, raise awareness, and innovate in all aspects of climate action, can we sustain the momentum towards sustainable development and a green post-pandemic recovery.
September 07, 2020 Monday
House Bill No. 6930 or the Family Tree Planting Act and the House Bill No. 6931 or the Graduation Legacy for Reforestation Act. Access the full documents through these links: http://congress.gov.ph/legisdocs/first_18/CR00357.pdf and http://congress.gov.ph/legisdocs/first_18/CR00358.pdf MANILA, 7 September 2020 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) welcomed the approval on third and final reading House Bill (HB) 6930 or the “Family Tree Planting Act” and HB 6931 or the “Graduation Legacy for Reforestation Act” which seeks to require individuals to plant a tree for every childbirth and graduation from senior high school (SHS) or college, respectively. HB 6930 seeks to mandate all expectant parents residing in the country, whether legally married or not, to plant two trees for every child born to them within their own home’s premises or in a designated area in their barangay, within 30 days after the child’s birth. Once enacted, this will be a requirement before the parents can claim their newborn’s birth certificate.  HB 6931 meanwhile aims to mandate graduating senior high school (SHS) and college students to plant two trees in areas in their locality designated by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), in coordination with the concerned local government unit and the schools, colleges, and universities. Once enacted, this will be added among the requirements for the students’ graduation. For the CCC, these two bills help in promoting a “whole-of-nation” approach in protecting and preserving the environment. This measure will help increase the awareness of Filipinos, particularly families and the youth, on the current state of the environment and the role of trees in mitigating climate impacts and disasters by retaining water to prevent landslides and flashfloods, acting as carbon sinks, and protecting and restoring natural ecosystems and biodiversity. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Climate Change and Land, “planting trees will always result in capturing more atmospheric carbon dioxide and thus in annual mean cooling of the globe.” As plants and trees grow, they take carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and turn it into sugars through photosynthesis. Planting additional trees could remove more carbon from the atmosphere and store it for a long time, as well as improve soil quality at a relatively low cost. Through these bills, the CCC said that these could further bolster and sustain local greening initiatives and mainstream the importance of planting the right species of trees, especially in vulnerable areas across the country.
September 06, 2020 Sunday
MANILA, 4 September 2020 — Filipino authors, book publishers, and climate and environment storytellers encouraged citizens to read more during this time of COVID-19 pandemic, during the 16th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Pathways,” with the topic on “Risk To Resilience: Narrating Our Story Through Books.” The online conversation, hosted weekly by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, featured local book industry experts and advocates, including Ms. Karina Bolasco, Vice Chair for External Affairs of the Book Development Association of the Philippines and Director of the Ateneo de Manila University Press; Ms. Ani Almario, President of the Book Development Association of the Philippines and Vice President for Product Development of Adarna House; Ms. Padmapani Perez, Asia editor, co-founder of Mt. Cloud Bookshop, and project lead of Agam Agenda at the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities (ICSC); and Dr. Kris Baleva, External Relations and Policy Specialist of the ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) who all shared various books and written stories of the Filipino people’s resilience in the face of adversities that provide education, entertainment, learning, and inspire behavioral change and action. “While we are locked down inside our homes during this quarantine, books just like plants have been deemed essential. People all over the world have turned to books in these very stressful times as a way to stay sane and to feed their minds,” Legarda said.  “Because now we have the time to read on topics that will help us understand why this pandemic is happening, we now have more time to pay attention to global challenges such as climate change, to understand how civilizations rise and fall, and even to read literary books that we have been postponing because we simply had no time in the old normal,” she added. Ms. Bolasco introduced the Ateneo University Press, its published works, and the challenges and opportunities for the publishers to adjust to the better normal. She featured some of their released books that are related to the environment and climate change. “On the other side of the pandemic, the publisher has to turn books into platforms or vessels for new vigorous and vibrant ideas, creative and scientific, that will help us reboot the world into one that is safe, sustainable, and equitable for all,” said Bolasco. Ms. Almario discussed the challenges and opportunities for book development and publishing in adjustment to the pandemic. She shared experiences from the Aklatan 2020 All-Filipino Book Fair, the biggest online book fair in the country and how it has supported the works of Filipino writers and book publishers during this period. “When businesses halted in mid-March, like all other businesses, publishing companies had no business for about three or four months, so the first thing we had to do was to quickly pivot our website so that it becomes an effective and efficient selling website. We did our very first online warehouse sale last June 19-21. People miss buying books and people wanted books because kids were at home,” said Almario. Ms. Perez presented the book “Agam: Filipino Narratives on Uncertainty and Climate Change,” the first-ever literary anthology on climate change, and its podcast version recorded in different dialects. She also invited Legarda to recite with her the poem entitled, “Mothers Speak.” “Sinasabi nito [Agam] na baguhin natin ang kwento. Let's reimagine the climate conversation by widening the storytelling circle around climate change. Hindi lang po mga eksperto ang may masasabi tungkol sa climate change, kung ‘di pati ang pangkaraniwang tao dahil nararanasan na po natin ang climate change at kailangan nating pag-usapan. Hindi pwedeng hayaan na lang na ibang tao ang gumagawa ng kwento tungkol sa mga karanasan natin sa climate change,” said Perez. Dr. Baleva discussed how the ACB communicates transformative change and preserves ASEAN’s rich natural heritage through the comic book on Responsible Tourism in ASEAN Heritage Parks and other ACB publications. “Raising awareness and educating ourselves through books and literature can remind us that what we do are all interconnected and can awaken in us the commitment we need for transformative change towards the sustainable use of biodiversity, and climate action that will take us to a better normal,” said Dr. Baleva. Legarda featured some of her written works and published books on the environment, climate change, disaster risk reduction, and Filipino culture and natural heritage, as well as her initiatives in supporting the Filipino book industry. “Share our knowledge and promote learning. Let's shamelessly promote ang ating mga aklat and support para sa ating mga publishers, sa ating mga printers, sa ating mga manunulat, sa ating mga tumutulong sa pagbabasa. Salamat sa pagbibigay ng koneksyon ng pagbabagong klima at pagbabasa,” Legarda concluded. As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, Stories for a Better Normal aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.             This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, and the Mother Earth Foundation.
September 03, 2020 Thursday
MANILA, 2 September 2020 — For the 16th episode of “Stories for a Better Normal: Pandemic and Climate Change Pathways,” with the topic “Risk to Resilience: Narrating Our Story through Books,” publishers, writers, and storytellers will gather to impart knowledge on environment and climate change issues, and narrate stories of Filipino people’s resilience in the face of adversities to inspire behavioral change and action. The episode, hosted by House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda, will air on Thursday, 3 September 2020, at 10:00 AM via Facebook Live at facebook.com/conglorenlegarda and facebook.com/CCCPhl/. Book publishers, writers, and storytellers for environmental and climate change education who will join the online conversation are the following: Ms. Ani Almario, President of the Book Development Association of the Philippines; Ms. Karina Bolasco, Vice Chair  for External Affairs of the Book Development Association of the Philippines; Ms. Padmapani Perez, Asia editor and project lead of Agam International; and Dr. Kris Baleva,  External Relations and Policy Specialist of the ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity.  In previous episodes, the online series tackled food gardening, saving seeds, permaculture, good nutrition and diet, youth climate activism, sustainable urban mobility, cultural heritage, planting native trees, and practical sustainability to teach citizens to be self-sustainable and self-sufficient. This upcoming episode will feature books that provide education, entertainment, and learning in order to encourage citizens to read more during this time of COVID-19 pandemic, as well as promote awareness of the importance of books to spur climate and environmental action.  As an online discussion to promote health, environmental consciousness, and climate-adaptive practices, "Stories for a Better Normal" aims to change the mindset of individuals, families, and communities by demonstrating ways in which a ‘better normal’ can be realized within our communities.   This online discussion is organized in partnership between the Office of Deputy Speaker Legarda and the Climate Change Commission, with support from the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, The Climate Reality Project-Philippines, and Mother Earth Foundation. 
September 01, 2020 Tuesday
MANILA, 31 August 2020 — The Climate Change Commission (CCC) urged national and local leaders to adopt green COVID-19 recovery plans, emphasizing on the need to integrate climate resilience and sustainability as core strategies and principles, in order to build back better and ensure a safer and more secure future for all Filipinos.   As the country strives to contain the rising COVID-19 cases in the country, the CCC emphasized that building back better should be the country’s way forward to overcome not only the challenges of the pandemic but also the threats brought about by what many considers as the more threatening phenomenon, which is the global climate crisis.   These factors implore governments to reinvigorate their economies once again in a manner that should not further degrade the state of our climate and environment than it already is.   Citing a study on “Will COVID-19 fiscal recovery packages accelerate or retard progress on climate change?” conducted by Oxford Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment, the CCC highlighted that the COVID-19 crisis represents a dramatic shock to the global economy that will affect progress on climate change in multifaceted ways.   The CCC therefore underscored that economic recovery from COVID-19 crisis must be centered on ecological investment and climate resilience-building programs, such as supporting low-carbon technologies, eco-construction, eco-design policies and investments in research and development for ecological purposes, investment in education and training to address immediate unemployment from COVID-19, and natural capital investment for ecosystem resilience and regeneration.   The CCC also cited the statement by the Global Commission on Adaptation (GCA)—signed by world leaders, including former United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Executive Secretary Patricia Espinosa, and House Deputy Speaker Loren Legarda—urging countries to build back better from the pandemic and to incorporate climate resilience into economic recovery packages.   The CCC supported the GCA’s call for accelerated progress in seven areas: locally-led adaptation, urban resilience, water resources management, social safety nets, food security, nature-based solutions, and disaster prevention. They also highlighted the call to “seize the opportunity to transform how we understand, plan, finance, and respond to risks” and to “integrate climate resilience into decisions at all levels of government and by businesses, communities, and households.”   With this, the climate body emphasized that the climate and environmental policies and laws in place must be enforced and inform the crafting of the country’s economic recovery packages to address the present and anticipate future challenges to our climate and environment, while promoting better health and wellbeing to all Filipinos.   In these challenging times, the CCC encouraged public and private sector leaders to foster a more people-centered approach to governance, promote inclusiveness, especially to the vulnerable and marginalized, and scale up sustainable initiatives to ensure that no one gets left behind.
August 30, 2020 Sunday
August 30, 2020 Sunday
MANILA, 30 August 2020 — In observance of National Heroes’ Day this August 31, the Climate Change Commission pays homage not only to our heroes of the past, but also to our unsung heroes amid the COVID-19 pandemic—our frontliners in the medical, service, food production, public safety, education, and media sectors who are laying down their lives and deserving of our utmost respect and support for their bravery during these unprecedented times. Celebrated every last Monday of August, National Heroes Day commemorates the Cry of Pugad Lawin, considered to be the beginning of the 1896 Philippine Revolution, which led to our country’s independence in 1898. In the CCC, we honor our frontliners beyond a simple thank you by following health, safety, and community quarantine measures to contain the spread of the virus and therefore ease the burden to our frontliners; and calling for the provision of the necessary support, whether financial, logistical, emotional, and mental, to their needs. The CCC also urges all to exemplify the spirit and determination of our historical and modern heroes and take on our part in solving the challenges brought about by this pandemic and the global climate crisis. Only through a united front can we fight for our survival, rebuild our country, and sustain our progress for future generations. The agency hopes that this year’s celebration of National Heroes’ Day would inspire every Filipino to work and build upon the sacrifices and hard work of our heroes and frontline workers for a free, secure, and resilient Philippines.
August 29, 2020 Saturday